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Blog Posts by Subject: Immigration and Emigration

Desfile Puertorriqueño | Puerto Rican Day Parade

Every year on the eve of the second Sunday of the month of June New York City holds the National Puerto Rican day parade. This is a celebration that takes over the entire city, fills it with beautiful events, festivals that display the beauty of the Puerto Rican culture.Read More ›

Celebrating Immigrant Heritage Month 2016

Happy Immigrant Heritage Month! The Library is proud to be hosting a wide array of events throughout the month of June to celebrate. Read More ›

Seward Park 100 Years Ago: Esther Johnston's Lower East Side

If we take Esther Johnston's memories as a standard, it is the library that has stayed the same more than anything. Read More ›

Ep. 25 "A Wonderful Curiosity About People" | Library Stories

As a personal financial counselor for the Library’s Money Matters program, Steve Poppel encounters people from all walks of life.Read More ›

Ep. 24 "I Would Like My Children to Speak English" | Library Stories

Juan Cordero immigrated to the United States from the Dominican Republic in order to build a better life for himself and his family. When one of his children gave him a flyer about free English classes at the Library, it opened up a whole new world of opportunities.Read More ›

Ep. 21 "Fulfilling My Own Destiny" | Library Stories

As an immigrant who successfully climbed her way to the top of the corporate ladder, Lucy Chan is using her retirement as an opportunity to help younger immigrant women navigate their new lives in the city. Read More ›

Reflections on Irish and Italian Immigration, Animosity, and Eventual Understanding

In his book, An Unlikely Union: The Love-Hate Story of New York’s Irish and Italians, Paul Moses recounts the history of two long-established immigrant groups that were so often in conflict.Read More ›

Landsmanshaftn in New York: A Quick Online Guide

Landsmanshaftn are Jewish community organizations of immigrants from the same city in Eastern or Central Europe. Their documents provide important information for genealogical research.Read More ›

Remembering Manhattan's Little Syria

Centered on Washington Street and Rector Street on the west side of Lower Manhattan, was once a neighborhood known as Little Syria. Located near the now-gone Washington Market and just south of the current location of the World Trade Center, it was a vibrant neighborhood characterized by store signs in Arabic, men and women in cultural clothing including veils and fezzes, and food such as Baklava in the cafes.Read More ›

The Refugee Experience: Books for Children

A selection of children's books on the refugee experience.Read More ›

Occupying Ellis Island: Protests In the Years Between Immigration Station and National Park

Ellis Island is powerfully symbolic in American culture. For many it marks the beginning of their American identity. For Native Americans and African Americans, it became a powerful place to stage a protest in the 1970s.Read More ›

Films to Celebrate Immigrant Heritage Month

Recent films that portray the American Immigrant Experience. From documentaries to wonderful works of fiction, they all provide some insight in what builds our diverse nation.Read More ›

Growing Up Chinese-American: Books for Young Readers

When I was growing up in the ’70s there was very little in the way of books that reflected who I was—a first generation Chinese-American girl living in New York City. I read everything I could get my hands on, but I could never see myself in the books from school or in the library.Read More ›

Remembering Our Ancestors: Maps and Genealogy Resources for Armenian-Americans

As an Armenian-American keenly aware of the devotion to lost homeland of my ethnic compatriots, I’ve always been on the lookout for Armenians among the researchers from many large ethnic groups who have found their way to the Map Division. April 24 is the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the Armenian Genocide, and one way to honor those who were not able to find refuge is to learn all we can about them and celebrate our link to them.Read More ›

Celebrating World Book Day with Stories of the Immigrant Experience

This year to celebrate we asked the staff to think about their favorite stories about people who have come to live in the United States from another country. Here are their recommendations.Read More ›

We Are New Yorkers: A Reading List for NYC Immigrant Heritage Week

Here are some vivid representations of the New York immigrant experience in fiction, as well as a few memoirs and biographies of New Yorkers past and present, who arrived here from all over the world and made their mark on our city. Read More ›

The Cooper Union's Retraining Program for Immigrant Engineers

In 1987, Bnai Zion initiated a program under its Scientists Division to help scientists and engineers who immigrated to the United States from the former Soviet Union to find jobs. The program now offers more than 20 introductory and high-technology courses designed to bring engineering, computer programming, and business skills of participants up to date. Read More ›

We Are New York: Language Learning at the Library

Learn about WANY and other opportunities to improve your language skills at the library.Read More ›

I Pledge Allegiance... Becoming a Citizen at The New York Public Library

I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

Color GuardHave you heard those words—the Pledge of Allegiance—recited recently, by a group of adults?

I hadn't, until I attended a naturalization ceremony at the Library. This past September 17, one of 180 special naturalization ceremonies held across the country to commemorate

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TeachNYPL: 'New York, Then & Now' Immigration to Washington Heights/Inwood (Gr. 6-8)

The story of immigration to America is a rich tapestry whose opposing threads, oddly for how much they reject each other's reality, hang together as one. It outrages us and gives us hope in frighteningly equal measure.

Nowhere is this truer than New York City, a city of extremes in every sense. The community known as Washington Heights/Inwood originally spanned from 135th Street north to the top end of Manhattan Island, surrounded by the Hudson River on the west and the East River with Spuyten Duyvil's deadly currents in between. Its land is the highest ground in 

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