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Blog Posts by Subject: Latin American Studies

Pura Belpré, In Her Own Words: NYPL Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

Pura Belpré reading to children at the New York Public Library. (Photo credit - Centro Archives)This year as part of Hispanic Heritage Month, the New York Public Library is celebrating its premier Latina Librarian, Pura Belpré. An exhibit at the Bronx Library Center highlights the professional life of Pura Belpré—Children's Librarian, 

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Música Soul: The Soundtrack of the Black Power Movement in Brazil

"If we had said 'Negro power' nobody would get scared. Everybody would support it. If we said power for colored people, everybody would be for that, but it is the word 'black' that bothers people in this country, and that's their problem, not mine." —Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture) at UC Berkeley, 1966

Stokely Carmichael by Lynn B. PadweBlack Rio Scene by Almir VeigaJames Brown released "I'm Black and I'm Proud" during the height of the Black Power Movement in the United States in 1968. Brown's in-your-face approach to racial pride resonated 

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Catching the 7 Line: The International Express to NYPL!

7 Train by Scott Beale on FlickrApril is Immigrant Heritage Month. In New York City, April 17th to 24th is Immigrant Heritage Week. In honor of both celebrations of Immigrant Heritage, this blog will focus on the multiculturalism of the 7 train.

If you live in Queens, New York, and you work in midtown like me, there might be a possibility that you often take the MTA train to work, particularly the

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The Art of Anna Bella Geiger

Harper Montgomery, a writer in the Wertheim Study, has curated a fascinating exhibition at Hunter College, going until May 4. At 68th and Lexington, it is a smallish (read: do-able) delight — Open Work in Latin America, New York & Beyond: Conceptualism Reconsidered, 1967-1978.

It features prints, artists' books, photography and videos, photocopies, all sorts of experimental treats, including Ed 

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Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month at the Bronx Library Center

Hispanic Heritage Month is observed in the U.S. each year from September 15 to October 15. This year's national theme is "Diversity United, Building America's Future Today." At the Bronx Library Center - NYPL's premier Latino/Puerto Rican Heritage Center, we have a variety of programs and events to learn and celebrate the Hispanic experience. Listed below are just a few of 

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Agosto se Agota con el Ritmo que Bota la Pelota, Anota y ¡Alborota!

Vamos a celebrar lo que va del verano ¡al ritmo tropical hispano! Como ya sabemos, muchos de los peloteros mas famosos mundialmente provienen de la República Dominicana, tales como Albert Pujols, Sammy Sosa, Alex Rodriguez y muchas otras destacadas personalidades del 

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Carlos Fuentes - Adiós a un gran escritor

Carlos Fuentes falleció hace pocos días, el 15 de Mayo del 2012. Nació en Panamá de padres mexicanos el 11 de Noviembre de 1928. Su padre era diplomático, lo que le brindó la oportunidad de vivir en diferentes ciudades en Latinoamérica.

Además de ser escritor también estuvo involucrado en la política, siendo embajador de México en Francia en 1975.

A su partida nos deja un gran legado cultural, su obra proliferó a lo largo de su exitosa carrera de escritor que comenzó 

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Hispanic Heritage Month: Many Backgrounds, Many Stories ... One American Spirit

Photo: Pura Belpre (1899-1982) Author, Storyteller and first Puerto Rican Librarian at the New York Public Library

It's Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 through October 15), the time of year to celebrate and recognize the contributions made by people of Hispanic descent to this great nation. This year's national theme is Many Backgrounds, Many Stories... One American Spirit.

According to the 2010 Census, 16 percent of the US population is Hispanic. Hispanic Americans include people from the following 

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Mario Vargas Llosa at The New York Public Library

Not that it happens very often, but when asked who my favorite contemporary writer is I always split it down the middle between Charles Portis and Mario Vargas Llosa.  Vargas Llosa's La Casa Verde - The Green House - is one of my all-time favorite novels along with The War of the End of the World,

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Great Albums You May Have Missed: Mongo Santamaria's Afro-Roots (1958-1959)

In every corner of the world, as far back in history as the time machines of archaeology and anthropology can take us, music has been used by humans to communicate with the gods. It’s hard to remember in our world today, steeped as it is in the bubblegum profanity of pop culture; but Mongo Santamaria’s album, Afro-Roots, reminds us. It is a gateway into the spirit-world. The conga drum itself is our metaphysical guide, bridging the gap between the visible and invisible worlds, and thus bringing us into direct contact 

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São Paulo: A Street Artist’s Paradise @ Grand Central Library

Come now through December to see an Exhibit at Teen Central in the Grand Central Library of Photos, Stickers and Zines from the streets of São Paulo.

In this pulsating, polluted metropolis of 18 million people – many of whom barely survive – exists a flourishing array of subcultures.  An extraordinary range of vibrant public art thrives amid broken buildings, garbage-strewn 

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NYPL celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

The New York Public Library’s premier Puerto Rican/Latino Cultural Center—The Bronx Library Center—kicks off Hispanic Heritage Month with Pioneros II: Puerto Ricans in New York City 1948–1998, an exhibit from the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College. The exhibit is based on the ... Read More ›

Literacy in the Arts: the Museum

A class field trip to El Museo del Barrio inspires the students' creativity.

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Highlight from Stuff for the Teen Age 2010 List - The Mariposa Club

The Mariposa Club by Rigoberto Gonzalez

It’s tough being a Latino and a gay teen, but Maui does the best he can. Danger is around every corner; the local Los Calis gangs are not fans of homosexuals. If he didn’t have his other gay friends Trini, Isaac, and Liberace he might just go insane. The boys realize there’s strength in numbers and decide to form a LGBT alliance at their school. When they unexpectedly lose one of their number, the club fizzles until there’s just one boy 

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Reader's Den: "Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon" Discussion Wrap-Up

If you enjoyed spending time with the lively and passionate characters of Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon by Jorge Amado this month, you may also find these titles interesting:

The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende

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Reader's Den: Discussion Questions for "Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon"

Have you been enjoying Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon by Jorge Amado? Please join me in discussing this novel by considering some of the following questions, or posting your own questions, thoughts, or favorite excerpts.

The story begins with the shooting of Dona Sinházinha (the wife) and Dr. Osmundo (the lover) by Colonel Jesuino Mendonca (the husband), and with old Filomena leaving Nacib. These two elements set forth the motion of the entire story and set the main thematic element 

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Reader's Den: "Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon" is “Innocent yet knowing, unquenchable and enticing…”

Read what Juan de Onis writes about Gabriela in 1962 for the American publication of Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon:

“…an exciting and enjoyable romp of a book, rich in literary delights […] For Americans, ‘Gabriela’ has additional significance, as a striking portrait of Brazilian reality and change, it may serve to bridge the ‘gap of understanding’ between two culturally and psychologically distinct areas of the New World.” — New York Times Book 

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Reader's Den: "Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon"

Welcome to the Reader’s Den!

Please join me in reading the book selection for March, Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon (Gabriela, cravo e canela) by Jorge Amado.

It’s 1925, and Ilhéus, a small Brazilian export town, is experiencing a disruption in its traditions, and the locals are finding that modern life is subject to comic interpretation. Join them in drinking sugarcane rum at the Vesuvius Bar courtesy of Nacib Saad, the Syrian bar owner; sharing in the gossip 

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