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Blog Posts by Subject: African American Studies

Black Life Matters Feature of the Week: Digging in the Vault

Today's Exhibition Feature of the Week comes from Tammi Lawson, our in-house Curator of the Art and Artifacts Division. She shares what inspired her to include the impactful artwork you see in our latest exhibition, Curators' Choice: Black Life Matters. Read More ›

Black Life Matters Feature of the Week: A Bit Of Life

In today's feature of the week, Mary Yearwood, our in-house Curator of the Photographs and Prints Division, discusses the brilliance of renowned shutterbug Richard Saunders, and how he inspired her contribution to the exhibition.Read More ›

An Interview With Titus Kaphar

Artist Titus Kaphar and The Jerome Project makes those impacted by our criminal justice system visible and human rather than statistics of mass incarceration and criminalization.Read More ›

Black Life Matters Feature of the Week: Evidence of Things Un*Seen

This week's feature is provided by Shola Lynch, Curator of our Moving Image and Recorded Sound Division. Here she discusses the importance of archival video and audio materials to black history.Read More ›

Black Life Matters Feature of the Week: Epistolary Lives

Curator Steven G. Fullwood discusses the importance of handwritten letters, an intimate component of our newest exhibition, Curators' Choice: Black Life Matters. Read More ›

En commémoration de l'histoire Afro-Américaine - Février 2015

Ce mois de février on célèbre l’Histoire des Noirs aux États-Unis. C’est en février 1926 que l’historien Afro-américain Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950) a proposé d’honorer les réalisations des Noirs américains en instituant le Mois de l’histoire des Noirs aux États-Unis. Read More ›

Black Life Matters Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: How You Can Help

The Schomburg Wikipedia Edit-a-thon will give patrons the tools to edit the popular online encyclopedia, with the goal of making black life more visible within its pages. If you can't attend in person there are still ways that you can participate wherever you are.Read More ›

Listen Up! Podcasts from the Schomburg Center

Subscribe now to hear our visiting scholars share their knowledge and passions.Read More ›

Selma Reading List

A reading list for all ages to accompany the movie Selma.Read More ›

Reading and Rereading James Baldwin

He has a breadth of writings to discover: fiction, essays and even plays and poetry. And though many words have been said in the past and present about him, it is hard not to want to add another paean of gratitude for his works.Read More ›

A Decade for People of African Descent

On December 9, ambassadors, UN dignitaries, students, and others, gathered in the Langston Hughes atrium for a pre-event to Human Rights Day and to the official takeoff of the International Decade for People of African Descent, both happening the following day. Read More ›

Schomburg Treasures: WPA Artwork

The Schomburg Center's collection of WPA artwork is now available on the NYPL's Digital Collections site.Read More ›

Song and Dance: The Power Of Black Music

American music is largely influenced by African American music, so concluded eminent musicologists just before the 20th century.Read More ›

Symphony of the New World: 50th Anniversary of a Pioneering Organization

In May 1964, two months before The Civil Rights Act (outlawing discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin) became law, noted conductor Benjamin Steinberg formed a committee of 13 musicians, 12 of whom were African American, with the intention of forming a new integrated orchestra called the Symphony of the New World (SNW).Read More ›

"Paroles de Femmes" is French for "Words of Women"

What could be more gratifying than a talented group of performers that can deliver a laudable show! Well, that is precisely what we saw on March 27 at the Mid-Manhattan Library in the program Paroles de Femmes, Femmes de Paroles, honoring Haitian Women Writers.Read More ›

A Trip Down Memory Lane: The Lasting Influence of Illmatic

Tomorrow marks the 20th anniversary of Nas’s debut album, Illmatic. On Wednesday, I had the privilege to attend the opening of the Tribeca Film Festival to watch my friend and former colleague Erik Parker’s documentary, Time Is Illmatic. Parker’s film examines Nas’s groundbreaking album because it symbolizes the shift of hip-hop’s nerve center and lyrics in 1994. Read More ›

Lorraine Hansberry: Dreamer Supreme

The Lorraine Hansberry Collection at the Schomburg Center For Research In Black Culture is a remarkably thorough record of family, personal, and professional papers, letters, manuscripts and photographs documenting her entire life as an artist and activist.Read More ›

One Man’s Library Education and the "Double V"

A Dutch author wrote to Ask NYPL, the ready reference division of The New York Public Library, with a request for information about a staff member of the NYPL on Staten Island in the 1940s. This library worker had been instrumental in encouraging the educational interests of the man who became the subject of the author's book.Read More ›

Dr. Cheryl LaRoche Presents "Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad: The Geography of Resistance" at Columbus Library

“When you think about the Underground Railroad, it is a land based operation, moving from one section of the country (where slavery exists) to another where it doesn’t take place—You must negotiate the land to get your freedom. We haven’t focused in on the land itself in the exploration of the Underground Railroad. When you start to read the land you come up with some different conclusions." Hear more from the author on Tuesday, February 11 at 4 p.m. Read More ›

12 Years a Slave. What About 15 Years in a Cave?

We’ll know in one month if Steve McQueen’s film gets an Oscar. But one thing is sure: the heretofore largely unfamiliar Solomon Northup has become a household name.Read More ›
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