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Blog Posts by Subject: African American Studies

Live from the Reading Room: Correspondence Episode 1

Today’s letter features correspondence between Arturo Alfonso Schomburg and Langston Hughes. In the excerpt below, Schomburg speaks with Hughes regarding acquisitions for The Division of Negro Literature, History and Prints—the forerunner to today’s Schomburg Center.Read More ›

Black Power!

The Black Power movement turns fifty this year. Two new digital exhibitions explore the multiform and ideologically diverse movement that deeply shaped black consciousness and identity and left an immense legacy that continues to inform the contemporary American landscape.Read More ›

February Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

A musical heritage of the Jewish community...uncovering psychological tricks of a hustler...racial inequality and a call to action...revisiting Folk City, New York...Woody Allen—a life...the intersection of word geeks and grammar police...criminal negligence in the U.S. armed forces...exploring Gramercy Park and Union Square...transformation of urban gardens...New York’s first and oldest charter school... beauty, culture and the fascination of Cuba...Read More ›

The Harlem Burial Ground

Another African Burial Ground was officially “discovered” in New York City a few days ago. If this is news to most, it is not to preservationists, historians, and archivists who have been aware of the existence of the cemetery for years. Read More ›

Black Women Artists: Augusta Savage

Katherine Ellington, a New York City medical humanities scholar and researcher, discusses the work and legacy of legendary artist Augusta Savage.Read More ›

2015 Schomburg Bestsellers List

From memoirs, to science fiction, and beautiful photo collections, take home a copy of each from the Schomburg Gift Shop before they sell out!Read More ›

Celebrate the Holidays With the Schomburg

Schomburg Communications Pre-Professional Alicia Perez recently uncovered holiday treasures from our ample collections. Here, she shares a few of her favorites.Read More ›

Telling Claudette Colvin's Important Civil Rights Story

Erika Paul, Pre-Professional in our Jean Blackwell Hutson Research and Reference Division, reflects on the significance of Civil Rights pioneer Claudette Colvin through a new display—sixty years after her courageous yet understated act.Read More ›

Meet the Schomburg's Newest Archivists!

Our newest archivists, Tiana Taliep and Alexsandra Mitchell, tell us what it’s like to research and preserve some of the finest materials across the African Diaspora, and their journey to the Schomburg Center.Read More ›

Honoring the Legacy of Abram Hill, Co-Founder of the American Negro Theatre

Hill continues to be lauded for his capital investment in the development of "Harlem's Little Library Theatre," as well as his cultivation of the black genre of American theater. Read More ›

Ta-Nehisi Coates's Reading List

"Folks who are not familiar with black literature, read this book and read a ton of other books." The following are all the books recommended by Ta-Nehisi Coates during his mesmerizing talk at the Schomburg Center.Read More ›

Podcast #83: Ta-Nehisi Coates on Theft, Atheism, and History

The author of Between the World and Me, Ta-Nehisi Coates has time and again shown his knack for both historicizing racial inequalities and positioning his interrogation of structural inequalities within lyrical personal narrative. Recently, LIVE from the NYPL presented Coates in conversation with Khalil Gibran Muhammad. Read More ›

Art, Futurism, and the Black Imagination

As we launch our brand new exhibition, Unveiling Visions: The Alchemy of the Black Imagination, scholar and artist Tiffany E. Barber reflects on the influence of Afrofuturism and the inspiration of the show's fantastic duo: Curators John Jennings and Reynaldo Anderson.Read More ›

Hempstead, Segregation and Black Suburbia

In honor of our new exhibition, Black Suburbia: From Levittown to Ferguson, we explore segregation in one of the most popular suburban neighborhoods in the U.S.—Hempstead, New York.Read More ›

Canada Lee: Actor, Trailblazer, Activist

Harlem-raised Canada Lee, who the New York Times once called “the greatest Negro actor of his day” has been almost totally forgotten in recent history. Lee began acting when his friend suggested he do a reading, and soon found himself protecting a young maverick director named Orson Welles, with whom he formed a lifelong friendship. Read More ›

The American Negro Theatre's Groundbreaking Radio Program, "New World A-Coming"

In September 1945, our American Negro Theatre (ANT) became the first theatrical company to present a radio program. Titled "New World A-Coming," the series aired Sunday afternoons for 30 minutes and was designed "to promote the universality of scripts, characters and performing talent."Read More ›

Occupying Ellis Island: Protests In the Years Between Immigration Station and National Park

Ellis Island is powerfully symbolic in American culture. For many it marks the beginning of their American identity. For Native Americans and African Americans, it became a powerful place to stage a protest in the 1970s.Read More ›

Remembering Ruby Dee, Celebrating the American Negro Theatre

Our former pre-professional, Farrah Lopez, pays tribute to American Negro Theatre alum Ruby Dee as we celebrate its 75th anniversary. Read More ›

New York City's Slave Market

On June 27, a plaque marking the site of New York City's main 18th-century slave market was unveiled in Lower Manhattan by Mayor Bill de Blasio. Read More ›

Schomburg Treasures: The StoryCorps Black LGBTQ Archive

The StoryCorps Black LGBTQ Archive is now available at the Schomburg Center.Read More ›
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