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Blog Posts by Subject: Government and Law

U.S. Census Bureau to Hire in the Boroughs

This fall the U.S. Census Bureau will hire over 500 temporary Field Representatives to conduct the New York City Housing and Vacancy Survey (NYC-HVS). This survey is conducted every three years to comply with the City's rent regulation laws. The Census Bureau has conducted the survey for the City since 1965.

Applicants who wish to take the Census test for the NYC-HVS must reside within Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Manhattan or the Bronx.

The pay rate for Field Representatives in these areas is $16.92 per 

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Why They Visit

Yesterday, more than 7,500 people waited outside my office here in the main building of the Library. Today looks just as busy. They are not waiting for the latest blockbuster movie or even, as is often the case, in smaller numbers, to use our computers. This is something entirely different.

We have on public display, together, for the first time in decades, one of two surviving copies of the Declaration of Independence in Thomas Jefferson's hand and one of the original copies of the Bill of Rights drawn up by George Washington to send to the states for ratification. 

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Landmark U.S. Supreme Court Decisions: A Book List

Last week, the United States Supreme Court ruled Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) to be unconstitutional under the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment.

In 1996 DOMA was signed into law by President Bill Clinton, barring federal recognition of same-sex marriages for purposes such as Social Security survivors' benefits, insurance benefits, immigration and tax filing.

Section 3 of the law defines marriage as "a legal union between one man and one woman as husband 

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Celebrating America: A Book List for Kids

In college, I studied American History and Politics, but my interest in these subjects was sparked long before that, when as a child, I was exposed to several books, movies and TV shows that celebrated American history.

Three items in particular had a tremendous impact on me, and made me want to learn more about my country. Schoolhouse Rock was a series of educational shorts that ran in between the cartoons on Saturday mornings. Almost anyone of my generation will tell you that 

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Jack Baker and James McConnell

Given yesterday's historic Supreme Court decision overturning the Defense of Marriage Act, it's good to take a moment to look back at the struggles for marriage equality.

In many current debates about the direction of LGBT political struggles, marriage equality has been portrayed as a conservative move after the radicalism of 1970s Gay Liberation and later Queer politics. However, a closer look reveals that LGBT activists have been deeply concerned over the right to marry since the start of modern gay 

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PTSD Awareness Month: Remembering the Disabilities We Can't Always See

June is PTSD Awareness Month, which aims to raise awareness of PTSD and its effective treatments so that everyone can help those affected. PTSD is an anxiety condition that can develop in response to exposure to an extreme traumatic event such as military combat, violent personal assaults, terrorist attacks, disasters or accidents. And while PTSD is not unique to veterans and military service members, it is often characterized as one of the "invisible wounds of war" and a "signature 

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50 Years of National Small Business Week

This year marks the 50th anniversary of National Small Business Week. Although things have certainly changed since President Kennedy signed the first Presidential Proclamation in 1963, one thing that hasn't changed is America's entrepreneurial spirit and the important role that small business owners play in our economy and our communities.

This week, President Obama has continued America's tradition of honoring the spirit and success of American small business owners by proclaiming June 17–21 to be 2013's National Small Business Week. Small businesses have 

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The Family and Medical Leave Act: 20 Years and Counting

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), celebrated its 20th anniversary earlier this year. Since 1993, workers have used FMLA leave to care for children and other family members more than 100 million times, secure in the knowledge that their job would be there upon their return. However, we know women still face many barriers to full participation in the workforce, and there is a continuing need to adopt practices that meet working mothers’ (and fathers’) needs in the 21st century workplace.

The above 

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A Guide to Women's Equal Pay Rights

The Women’s Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor recently released two guides on Equal Pay, A Guide to Women’s Equal Pay Rights and An Employer’s Guide to Equal Pay. These guides are also published in four additional languages: Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese and

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Closing the Equal Pay Gap: 50 Years and Counting

President Barack Obama officially declared Tuesday, April 9, 2013 as National Equal Pay Day. In a statement issued Monday, April 8, Obama said, "Women, who make up nearly half of our nation's workforce, face a pay gap that means they earn 23 percent less on average than men do. This disparity is even greater for African-American women and Latinas. On National Equal Pay Day, we recognize this injustice by marking how far into the new year women have to work just to make what 

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Join Us at SIBL April 3rd for "Freedom of Information in the Drone Age"!

Fact: Hardly a day goes by without some discussion in the press about "drones" — unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVS).

Fact: Despite public awareness of U.S. drone programs, very little hard information has been offered to the public.

Fact: Portions of the legal and public policy justifications for implementing U.S. drone programs, as well as other documentation and information about these programs, have been only reluctantly provided to the public.

Fact: You have an opportunity to learn more about many of these and other information issues 

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What's Next? WestlawNext: A Legal Resource for NYPL

Free legal resources on the Internet are great for everyone's needs. Until they aren't. So, what do you do next?

Libraries — public libraries — are for many a community the place where citizens expect to find law-related resources: Federal and State legislative and regulatory materials, and in many larger communities case law and lawyer-oriented secondary sources for those carefully researching legal issues. The move to web-based legislative, administrative and other legal resources by Federal and State governments and court systems is, of course, a trend 

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Special Library in Focus: The National Archives at New York City

I was super excited to tour the National Archives at New York City (part of the National Archives and Records Administration or NARA) on February 12, 2013 because I thought that it would be a terrific experience for the staff of the library. I became even more convinced that it would be a great experience when I saw a photo of the new location of the NARA library at a METRO (Metropolitan Library Council of New York) conference. The architecture in the building is spectacular! The new location is as 

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Drones, Information and the Right to Know: FOI Day at NYPL, April 3, 2013

Of what concern are drones to librarians and other information professionals? I mean those drones, scions of the remote-control model airplanes of a more innocent age — now grown up and more sinister and troublesome than anyone might have predicted in their youth (or might they?)

The use of drones in the area of national security, not to mention law enforcement generally, has emerged as a hot topic recently. The topic isn't new of course. Nevertheless, the discussion has begun to heat up, with 

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Historic Presidential Speeches in the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound

In honor of President Obama's upcoming inauguration, the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound would like to present a compilation of historic presidential speeches selected from our collections.

The list consists of commercial and archival recordings which contain campaign, election, inaugural, resignation, congressional speeches, radio broadcasts, and various other important presidential profiles which address historic and cultural milestones in American 

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James A. Hamilton: Mousetraps, Memory and a Forgotten Secretary of State

In 1869, James Alexander Hamilton published a memoir. The third son of Alexander Hamilton was a Columbia-educated district attorney, colonel, writer and diplomat who addressed many aspects of his "varied life" in The Reminiscences of James A. Hamilton.i But while The Reminiscences have often been used as a source in the biographies of the father, they have never been used to tell the story of the son. A selection of Hamilton's papers and correspondence made it into the published work but the

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Looking For Employment? FEMA is Hiring

In the aftermath of the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is hiring local employees to help with the recovery of many communities impacted by the storm.

For more information or to apply for temporary positions, go to:

New York State Job Bank website:

newyork.us.jobs

Insert the word FEMA in the keyword search box to access FEMA’s job postings.

FEMA provides equal opportunity for all employees and applicants without 

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Short-Term Research Fellows: A Closer Look at Brooklyn History

As a graduate student whose dissertation examines the development of Brooklyn in the nineteenth century, I have spent more hours than I care to count the past several years poring through documents in the Brooklyn Historical Society, the Brooklyn Public Library and other repositories in what was formerly the nation's third-largest city and is now New York City's most populous borough. Recently however, through the New York Public Library's Short-Term Research Fellowship Program and 

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Transmissions from the Timothy Leary Papers: Ron Paul for President

With the current United States presidential election approaching, I thought it appropriate to share a couple items from the Timothy Leary papers relating to Ron Paul.

US Congressman Ron Paul lost his bid for President in 1988 under the Libertarian Party ticket. He has since sought election unsuccessfully under the Republican ticket in both 2008 

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The Country, the Economy, the Election... and Why Haven't I Marched with Occupy Wall Street Yet

The U.S. economy and the upcoming presidential election are on my mind as well as on the minds of many Americans.

I'm not an economist, a political science major or an historian.

I'm a librarian at the Mid-Manhattan Library who specializes in health and medicine — but, I am interested in understanding what has happened to our country over the past ten years.

Perhaps others can make sense of it all by following the media reports — 

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