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Blog Posts by Subject: Broadcasting, Radio and Television

Game of Thrones is Back! Now Where is it Going?

(Warning: I tried to eliminate any direct spoilers but links and comments may tell more then casual fans who are following the show's pace want to know. Fans who want to remain surprised can bookmark this post and come back after they have read the books or finished the show.) Read More ›

Mad Men: The Beginning of the End

It has been a long and memorable ride, unlike any other on television. But the final season of Mad Men begins April 13. It's the beginning of the end. Whatever will be, will be. The first episode of Mad Men was set in March 1960. Season 6 ended in November 1968. That's eight years and eight months. Where does that leave us? [spoiler alert!]Read More ›

Time Machine: Concatenations in Time Travel, VHS a cc: to the Future

I am remembering our old purchase order form, a multi copy (ten copies press firmly) missive to Ruth, our beloved curmudgeon in Purchasing (her voicemail began with a sigh). Each copy was fainter and less readable than its predecessor. I am thinking about VHS, a format that succeeded by virtue of its worst quality, the ability to record at a slower speed (up to six hours on a T-120 cassette). What better way for balletomanes to compile every dance performance ever broadcast on two 

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Cooking with the Stars

I love cookbooks. Yet, I rarely cook. When I do, I am more inclined to cook with an experimental zeal and do not necessarily follow any printed guidance from experts in the field of cookery. However, I thoroughly enjoy reading how simple little ingredients can get weird with each other and become delicious meals. The cookbooks that I am most enthusiastic about are by people who are well known in various mediums (none of which include food preparation).

For example, I would like entrée advice from Coolio. Luckily, there is

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Great Book Web Sites

I was inspired to write this blog from my terrific experience with booktv.org. I very much enjoy watching and listening to authors describe their research and conclusions that they have metamorphosed into works of literature.

BookTV is featured on CSPAN2 (Channel 66 in my neighborhood) on weekends, if you have cable TV. It features authors of nonfiction works being interviewed about their books. Following the interview, the floor is opened up to audience questions. One weekend, I was delighted to discover that they have a web site. It got me to thinking about what 

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Number One Hits for the Year: 1979

I was recently going through a box of old photographs and came across photos from the first concert I ever attended: Kiss. October 21, 1979. Houston Summit. I was 10.

That got me to thinking of the music from that year.

1979 marked the end of arguably one of the most unfortunate eras in American music history:

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VEEP! A Review

One of my favorite shows on HBO, VEEP, just wrapped up its second season this summer.

In case you didn't know, this show follows around the fictional Vice President (VP) of the United States: Selina Meyer, played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus (who also played Elaine Benes in the television sitcom

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The Wonder Years: Music and References from Season One

What would you do if I sang out of tune? Would you stand up and walk out on me?

I don't know about you, but certain songs are for me forever associated with certain movies and television shows.

What do you think of when you hear Roy Orbison's "In Dreams"? How about when you hear Stealers Wheel's "Stuck in the Middle With 

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Orange Is the New Black: A Reading List

Orange Is the New Black is the latest series from Netflix based on Piper Kerman's memoir of the same name. The main character, Piper Chapman, is a middle class woman who has to leave behind her life in order to serve 15 months in prison for transporting a suitcase full of drug money for an international drug smuggler/former lover.

Piper and other characters such as Tastyee, Red and Alex are seen reading or referencing various books throughout the series. I decided to watch 

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When They Trod the Boards: Giancarlo Esposito, Breaking Bad-Ass on Broadway

Being an actor doesn't shield you from having a conscience.

—Giancarlo Esposito

Giancarlo Esposito, as Gus Fring, stares down a sniper in the TV series Breaking Bad, 2011.Giancarlo, as Julio, sings in the Broadway musical Seesaw, 1973.A true NYC moment: Giancarlo and brother Vincent take a sidewalk hotdog break during the musical The Me Nobody Knows, 1971. Photo: NewsdayI don't know how the final season of the TV series Breaking Bad will end, but it is pretty clear that Walter White is on a one-way trip to hell. As the well-intentioned chemistry teacher turned 

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158 Yo Gabba Gabba: More Help Than Yo' Self Can Handle

I used to be afraid of bugs.

I used to have trouble falling asleep.

I used to have trouble sharing items with friends.

Then I started watching Yo Gabba Gabba and I didn't have any more troubles.

You don't need Dr. Phil. All you need is Yo Gabba Gabba to set you free from everyday anxieties. 

The

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Confessions of an Anglophile

I get asked a lot about my Union Jack tattoo. Mainly, "why?" My answer? "Why not? I just like all things British and Scottish, okay? Geesh. Leave me alone!" But the real answer is bit more complicated. Those stories, those places just always captured my imagination. Growing up in Northern Idaho anyplace outside of my corner of North America was exotic in my book. Or perhaps I should just give the simplest answer, which is, "I blame my parents."

kucinski on flickrMy father was 

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Mad Men on the Menu

You are what you eat is the common adage, but What you eat describes who you are is more appropriate for circa 1960s Madison Avenue and New York City.

The power lunch. Two-for-one happy hour. The business dinner. A sandwich from the corner diner. Scotch at 11am.

Food and drink play an important role in Mad Men.

The production design certainly gives the show an air of visual authenticity and nothing grounds a 

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Steal This Story Time: Won't You Be My Neighbor Day

Photo courtesy of the Fred Rogers Company.March 20, 2013 would have been Mr. Roger's 85th birthday. At the Webster Library we celebrated by having our very own Won't You Be My Neighbor Day. The premise was simple (but as Mr. Rogers says, "Deep and simple is far more essential than shallow and complex"). Won't You Be My Neighbor Day encourages everyone to do one neighborly act—and of course, wear a sweater!

I grew up with Mr. Rogers. It is difficult for 

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¡Descubre el secreto de las mujeres felices con Maria Marín de Univisión en vivo!

En celebración del Mes de La Historia de la Mujer, Maria Marín presentará su último éxito literario Si soy tan buena, ¿por qué estoy soltera? el Sábado, 23 de Marzo a las 4:30pm en la Biblioteca Central del Bronx.

¡Ven a compartir con nosotros de esta presentación tan esperada en español con admisión 

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Free Job Training in Cable Installation

Brooklyn Workforce Innovations (BWI) helps unemployed and underemployed New Yorkers establish careers in sectors that offer good wages and opportunities for advancement.

Currently BWI offers free job training programs in four industries: telecommunications cable installation, skilled woodworking, TV and film production, and commercial driving.

Brooklyn Networks is an exciting and challenging telecommunications cable installation program that allows its students 

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Julia Child: Her Magnificent Obsession

Is NYPL obsessed with food? Maybe, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. The popular Lunch Hour NYC exhibition at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building opened June 2012 and runs through February 17. It celebrates over a century of New York lunches. Don't miss the online exhibit and the menu collection. In conjunction with the exhibit, NYPL has hosted multiple

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A Cold Night's Death: The Allure of Scandinavian Crime Fiction

Maybe you've got the Nordic noir bug from reading Stieg Larsson's Millennium series (we've all seen those ubiquitous neon paperbacks on the subway) or were enthralled earlier by Peter Høeg's Smilla's Sense of Snow or the Detective Wallander series of books. However you encounter them, Scandicrime writers such as Henning Mankell, Larsson, or Jo Nesbø are like a good bag of chips, it's hard not to have another. This is a selective guide to some notable authors and detective series from Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and even some Nordic noir from Iceland, and what's better, a guide to

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Korean Drama: Goong

Goong, based on the manhwa (Korean comic book) of the same name, is one of those dramas that are so colorful and beautiful that you can overlook how much it drags at times or how the characters talk so slow as if there is just too much time in the day.

The story is set in an alternative South Korea, where the country is still a monarchy instead of a democracy.

It begins when the King of South Korea dies. The Royals are losing popularity so they decide that 

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Django Unchained: Lorraine Hansberry Unbridled

Angelic stranger, Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz) grants freedom to hapless Texas slave Django (Jamie Foxx). Schultz, a kindly German dentist-turned-bounty hunter, provides Django with employment, trusting friendship and his first handgun. Django is reborn as a slave-turned-bounty hunter, becoming a vengeful black American superman on a dangerous and deadly mission to free his lovely German-educated wife, Broomhilda von Shaft (Kerry Washington), from a Mississippi cotton plantation.

Django Unchained, directed by

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