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Blog Posts by Subject: Readalikes

What to Read Next: Spies & Assassins and John Green/TFIOS Read-a-Likes

Summertime and the living is easy or so they say. All that free time but what to do? More importantly what to read? There’s way too many choices these days and what happens when you go into a library and they don’t have what you’re looking for? Ugh, so frustrating! You do have a few choices: you can browse the shelves, you can ask a friend or a trusted librarian for recommendations, check the Summer Reading book lists or... you can read this post. I’ve researched some of the most ask for genres at branches and compiled some great read-alikes. Surely there’s something here that’ll Read More ›

Read Alikes for Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch

Congratulations to Donna Tartt for winning the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in fiction for her novel The Goldfinch. If you've already read it, then you know why everyone's going ga-ga over it. But if you're still waiting patiently in the holds line to read it, then perhaps we can suggest a few plot-driven, "what's going to happen next?" titles for you to read in the meantime.Read More ›

Book Discussion at Epiphany, "The Wine of Solitude" by Irène Némirovsky

Irène Némirovsky is a well known French writer who became popular in the United States after the posthumous publication of her book Suite Francaise. The book group has read her work once before and decided to revisit her for our September meeting. This time around we read The Wine of Solitude.

At least semi-autobiographical, the book 

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Inspired by Jack Finney's Time and Again: A Gilded Age Reading List from 1882 New York

"The great demand is for fiction!"

"Among all classes of people, do you think?"

"Yes, sir."

"Then you mean to say," persisted the reporter, "that the principal portion of the reading public of New York is composed of novel readers."

"That is it exactly, so far as library patrons are concerned," replied the librarian.

—The New York Times, January 22, 1882

Welcome back to the Reader's Den. I hope you enjoyed reading

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Following Cheryl Strayed's Journey on the Pacific Crest Trail

How interesting could a book about a long walk possibly be? In the case of Cheryl Strayed's book Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, the answer is very. Some may have foolishly initially shied away from this book because it's an Oprah's Book Club selection and a memoir, a combination that proved problematic for

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June Reader's Den: 11/22/63 Week Three

Waiting for "Downton Abbey"

Updated February 2012! Do the names Lord Grantham, Mr. Carson, and Lady Violet mean anything to you? Can you discuss at length the love story of Mary and Matthew? Does the word week-end, bring to mind Maggie Smith’s impeccably-timed line delivery? If so, then you are a Downton-ite... or is it Downton-head? Whatever the case may be, it means that you are a fan of the ITV/Masterpiece Theater drama Downton Abbey. First airing on PBS in January 2011, this British series depicts 

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Game of Thrones Reading List: The Grouchy Librarian's Guide to Down and Dirty Fantasy

The hype is done, the premiere of HBO’s A Game of Thrones has come and gone, and now the fires of curiosity are stoked. What’s this all about? Why all the raves?  Why does it prompt sci-fi and fantasy luminaries like Anne McCaffrey to proclaim, “Such a splendid tale and such a fantasticorical!”

The biggest draws of George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series are the frank brutality, morally grey characters, and 

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