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Blog Posts by Subject: Poetry

NYPL Recommends: New Kids Poetry

Our Best Books for Kids committee has been busy reading and reviewing 2016 titles. Here are a few of their favorite new poetry books for kids.Read More ›

Exploring the Literary Within the Black Power Movement

When we explore the dynamics of the Black Power Movement, we must not fail to explore the Black Arts Movement as well. It was the artistic voice that helped increase political activism and express the importance of cultural values through various art forms. Read More ›

Can You Ace Our Literary Limerick Quiz?

We asked our NYPL book experts to—you guessed it—write some book-related limericks. We even asked their friends and families to play along.Read More ›

Live From the Reading Room: Zora Neale Hurston to 'Bill'

Today’s episode features a letter from writer, anthropologist, and folklorist, Zora Neale Hurston to her friend, “Bill.”Read More ›

Experiments with the New York School of Poets

Our March poetry workshop discussed the New York School of poets, their influences, their style, and their writing habits as it captured the spirit of the 1950s and 60s in New York City. Taking some of these habits, we wrote poetry, trying for a slice of life or a walk down a New York street, using drips and splashes of collaged ideas.Read More ›

Novedades de Abril 2016: Poesía para cada día

El mes de abril es el mes nacional de la poesía, rendimos un homenaje al gran poeta Rubén Darío al cumplirse 100 años de su muerte.Read More ›

Podcast #106: Elizabeth Alexander and Hilton Als on Dreams and Obsession

Elizabeth Alexander is a poet, essayist, and scholar perhaps best known for reading her poem "Praise Song for the Day" at the inauguration of President Barack Obama. Her latest work is a memoir, The Light of the World. Hilton Als, theater critic of the New Yorker and author of White Girls, joined Alexander at LIVE from the NYPL.Read More ›

30 Days of Shakespeare

We asked thirty staff members to select and read their favorite Shakespeare speech, monologue, or sonnet. We will release one each day throughout the month of April.Read More ›

Live from the Reading Room: Nathan Woodard to Alice Childress

A love letter from musician and composer Nathan Woodard to his wife and creative collaborator Alice Childress.Read More ›

Reading Wesleyan Press

The works of four poets and writers from Wesleyan University Press.Read More ›

Expand Your Search for Love with Columbia Granger's

The trouble with a narrowly defined search for love is you might not find exactly what you are looking for. This Valentine's Day, fall hopelessly in love with Columbia Granger's World of Poetry. Read More ›

Podcast #98: Yusef Komunyakaa on Politics, Imagery, and Memorizing Poetry

In 1994, Yusef Komunyakaa won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. An author of poetry, prose, and drama, his most recent work is The Emperor of Water Clocks.Read More ›

Five From Dalkey Archive

In continuation of the Three (or more) Series: Dalkey Archive's specialty lies within curating and bringing forth names in literature that are often left out of the conversation. Many of these titles fall under avant garde, while others are titles that have been forgotten about, or never translated for the English speaking world.Read More ›

Quiz: Which Poet Wrote It?

Some lines of poetry enter the zeitgeist, assuming a life of their own beyond the constraints of the poem. We've rounded up some of the most iconic, and we're asking you to match them to the poets who wrote them. Read, set, trochee!Read More ›

Book Notes From The Underground: Going To The Dogs

Dogs and books. What could be better? How about if we combine the two? What do we get? Books about dogs! If you're a fan of books and dogs, here are a few titles that may interest you.Read More ›

New York: A Reading List from Open Book Night

A wide variety of titles, including memoirs, essays, classic and contemporary fiction, history, and poetry connected to New York. Read More ›

An Ode to New Children's Poetry

Roses are red / violets are blue / Here's some new poetry for kids / That adults might like too.Read More ›

Romantic Interests: Sex, Lies and Poetry Redux, Part 2

Shelley's literary response to the events in England was less judicious than Byron's. Oedipus Tyrannus; or, Swellfoot the Tyrant, a two-act barnyard burlesque in which all the leading political figures of the day were satirized, was rushed into print in London and caught the censor's eye the moment it appeared. Read More ›

“It’s Me, Singing, Gone But Here”: Honoring Poet Philip Levine

The Pulitzer prize-winning poet Philip Levine (b. 1928) died on February 14, 2015. His papers, housed in the New York Public Library’s Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American literature, is the source of a “flash exhibition” honoring his work and legacy (“It’s Me, Singing, Gone But Here”), on display in the Schwarzman Building’s McGraw Rotunda June 12–25.Read More ›
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