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Book Notes From The Underground: Going To The Dogs

Dogs and books. What could be better? How about if we combine the two? What do we get? Books about dogs! If you're a fan of books and dogs, here are a few titles that may interest you.Read More ›

New York: A Reading List from Open Book Night

“And New York is the most beautiful city in the world? “It is not far from it. No urban nights are like the night there. “I have looked down across the city from high windows. It is then that the great buildings lose reality and take on their magical powers. They are immaterial; that is to say, one sees but the lighted windows. “Squares after squares of flame, set and cut into the Aether. Here is our poetry, for we have pulled down the stars to  our will.”  —Ezra Pound, Patria Mia (1950) Frankly, we were a bit hesitant to ... Read More ›

An Ode to New Children's Poetry

Roses are red / violets are blue / Here's some new poetry for kids / That adults might like too.Read More ›

Romantic Interests: Sex, Lies and Poetry Redux, Part 2

Shelley's literary response to the events in England was less judicious than Byron's. Oedipus Tyrannus; or, Swellfoot the Tyrant, a two-act barnyard burlesque in which all the leading political figures of the day were satirized, was rushed into print in London and caught the censor's eye the moment it appeared. Read More ›

“It’s Me, Singing, Gone But Here”: Honoring Poet Philip Levine

The Pulitzer prize-winning poet Philip Levine (b. 1928) died on February 14, 2015. His papers, housed in the New York Public Library’s Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American literature, is the source of a “flash exhibition” honoring his work and legacy (“It’s Me, Singing, Gone But Here”), on display in the Schwarzman Building’s McGraw Rotunda June 12–25.Read More ›

Romantic Interests: Sex, Lies and Poetry Redux, Part 1

When the dissolute, spendthrift son of George III ascended the throne, he wished to rid himself of his wife, Caroline, from whom he had long been estranged, and instituted divorce proceedings against her in the House of Lords. The "trial" lasted for eleven weeks during the summer and autumn of 1820.Read More ›

Art for a Lifetime: A Poetry Writing Workshop Review

Over the last two months, we brought together a group of people to read, write, and discuss poetry in the library. The eight week workshop, The Art of Making Poems: Creation and Craft, was led by poet/instructor Hermine Meinhard, who guided with a unique and playful approach to writing. Read More ›

Celebrating Our Voices During National Poetry Month

The Schomburg Center's Public Programs Pre-Professional, Jamara Wakefield, shares what inspires her as a spoken word artist in honor of April's National Poetry Month.Read More ›

Ask the Author: Jorie Graham

Jorie Graham has a new collection of her work out this Spring entitled From the New World: Poems 1976-2014. We asked her six questions about what she likes to read.Read More ›

Erasures in Literature

Erasure is a form of literature, often poetry, created by selectively erasing words from an existing text to produce a new work. An event on April 25 will showcase examples and give you a chance to create your own.Read More ›

Novedades de Abril 2015: Celebrando el Mes Nacional de la Poesía

He aquí algunas obras que nos inspiran a celebrar cada día ¡el mes nacional de la poesía!Read More ›

For the Love of Poetry

I always tell kids that it is okay if they are not fans of a certain genre or literary form as there is something in the library for everyone. You never know when you will find something, like a silly poem about boogers, that will tickle your funny bone and get you excited about reading. Read More ›

Great Poetry by Your Favorite Fiction Writers

So you "love to read, but don't like poetry"? Get ready to see your favorite fiction authors in a whole new light.Read More ›

5 Poems to Read Aloud for All Ages

Crowd-pleasing poems for Poetry Month.Read More ›

30 Days of Poetry: A Kid's Eye-View of WPA-Era New York City

The Doughnut Boy and Other Poems offers a glimpse of New York City through the eyes of a sassy little beret-wearing, doughnut-loving, public-transit-taking, library-visiting child.Read More ›

30 Days of Poetry

April is National Poetry Month! To celebrate here at The New York Public Library we recorded thirty of our librarians and other staff members reading a favorite poem.Read More ›

MY Business is to Sing: Emily Dickinson, Musician and Poet

The daily musical activities of poet Emily Dickinson reveal a great deal about the cultural offerings available to a woman of her time, place, and class. For Dickinson, these experiences provided a vital and necessary backdrop for her identity and and more importantly, for her emerging poetic voice.Read More ›

Poetry + Fiction For Teens

I’ve been doing a lot of reading lately for several committees including NYPL’s Best Books For Teens 2014 (coming later this month -- stay tuned!) When I looked back over all the young adult books I read this year, I definitely noticed a recurring theme of poetry. Read More ›

Podcast #39: Mark Strand on the Artistic Imagination

The beloved poet and author joined us this past October to discuss art, imagination, and the life of the mind. Read More ›

Little Orphant Annie by James Whitcomb Riley

Hoosier poet James Whitcomb Riley reminds all of us children to beware of goblins.Read More ›
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