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Blog Posts by Subject: Fiction

Contemporary Southern Writers

Seven recent books by Southern writers.Read More ›

While You Wait For "The Orphan Train" Why Not Try…

Like The Orphan Train, by Christina Baker Kline, these moving, character-driven titles delve into the subjects of orphans, foster care, family issues, unexpected friendships, secrets, rediscovery and the promise of second chances.Read More ›

Tycoons: Real and Imagined

Whether you're a penny pincher or a big spender, tycoons offer a wealth of fascinating stories. These books, both fiction and nonfiction, dramatize big business. From captains of industry to investment bankers, these money bags characters have stories worth their weight in gold.Read More ›

Book Notes From The Underground: September 2014

Here are some new noteworthy titles that may or may not be receiving the attention they deserve.Read More ›

Best In Class: The Most Outstanding Fictional Teachers

Outstanding teachers offer their students new ways of looking at the world, and outstanding fictional teachers offer the same to their readers. Some, like Anagrams' Benna, delight with zany wordplay. Others, like Dracula's Van Helsing, can even strike fear into the undead. If NYPL gave report cards, these teachers would earn top marks.Read More ›

From Boyhood to Beyond: Books About the Passage of Time

Richard Linklater's new movie Boyhood was filmed with the same cast over the course of twelve years. Here are some novels that also concern themselves with the passing of time, from Proust's masterpiece Swann's Way to contemporary popular fiction like Mitch Albom's The Time Keeper.Read More ›

September Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

Any of these subjects pique your curiosity? If so, join us for an Author @ the Library talk this September at Mid-Manhattan Library to hear distinguished non-fiction authors discuss their work and answer your questions. Author talks take place at 6:30 p.m. on the 6th floor of the Library, unless otherwise noted. You can also request the authors' books using the links to the catalog included below. Read More ›

August Reader's Den: The Circle by Dave Eggers, Part II

Welcome to Part II of August in the Reader’s Den. We have been discussing Dave Egger’s novel about a monomaniacal digital corporation called The Circle. Our protagonist, Mae Holland, has grown ever more fervently to believe in the positive social impact of ‘completing’ the Circle. Read More ›

While You Wait For "The Vacationers," Why Not Try...

These character-driven titles portray characters dealing with family issues and relationships, friendships, long buried secrets, journeys into the past and life changing events.Read More ›

Book Notes From The Underground: July 2014

Here are some new noteworthy titles that may or may not be receiving the attention they deserve:Read More ›

June 2014 Reader's Den: "The Judgment of Paris" by Ross King, Part 3

Other recommended works:

The Girl Who Loved Camellias by Julie Kavanagh The fascinating history of Marie DuPlessis chronicles the life of the courtesan who inspired Alexandre Dumas fils’s novel and play La dame aux camélias, Giuseppe Verdi’s opera La Traviata, George Cukor’s film Camille, and Frederick 

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The True Delights of Penny Dreadfuls

What’s not to love about Showtime’s new gothic series Penny Dreadful? It features Doctor Frankenstein and his monster, Dracula’s Mina Harker, and Wilde’s Dorian Gray, along with séances, ancient Egyptian vampires, gunslingers, serial killers, and maybe even a werewolf, set against the mysterious backdrop of Victorian London. Read More ›

Book Notes From The Underground: May 2014

Here are some new noteworthy titles that may or may not be receiving the attention they deserve. Read More ›

Epistolary Novels and Letter Writing

"Epistolary" is one of those words that just fun to say or think about, like the word "condensation". An epistolary novel is simply a novel consisting of correspondence between characters. This is one of those rarely used writing devices, I assume because it's difficult to sustain throughout a novel.Read More ›

Read Alikes for Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch

Congratulations to Donna Tartt for winning the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in fiction for her novel The Goldfinch. If you've already read it, then you know why everyone's going ga-ga over it. But if you're still waiting patiently in the holds line to read it, then perhaps we can suggest a few plot-driven, "what's going to happen next?" titles for you to read in the meantime.Read More ›

Book Notes From The Underground: April 2014

Here are some new noteworthy titles that may or may not be receiving the attention they deserve.Read More ›

Book Notes From The Underground: March 2014

Here are some new noteworthy titles that may or may not be receiving the attention they deserve:Read More ›

Booktalking "Silhouette of a Sparrow" by Molly Beth Griffin

Sixteen-year-old Garnet Richardson finds a breath of fresh area in her summer visit to Excelsior, Minnesota in 1926 to live in a hotel with Mrs. Harrington and her daughter Hannah. She is relieved to escape the problems of home, and a little bit scared to enter into the world of the intriguing and beautiful flapper, 17-year-old Isabella. She is excited to start her life as a career woman as a hat shop girl with Miss Maples. Garnet and Isabella share a passion with each other that is definitely not accepted at that time and place.Read More ›

The Reader's Den: Flannery O'Connor's "The Life You Save May Be Your Own"

Flannery O'Connor's "The Life You Save May Be Your Own" was originally published in the 1955 short story collection, A Good Man is Hard to Find. Like many of her short stories, it centers around the appearance of a stranger on the horizon, (literally, in this case!) and that stranger's effect on the lives of others.Read More ›

Looking for a Good Book? Try an Award-Winning Read

Each year multiple literary prizes are awarded to recognize the works of great writers. Some of these awards are well known and much anticipated like the prestigious Nobel Prize for Literature, while others are lesser known. Here is a list of some of the more popular literary awards given out this year.

The Nobel Prize for Literature was established in 1901 at the bequest of Alfred Nobel (Swedish chemist, engineer, innovator and inventor of dynamite). It is awarded by the Swedish Academy in 

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