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How to Draw, Color, Sketch, Doodle and Tangle

Coloring books are all the rage… for the kindergarten set and for grown ups too. You could say it's a fad, but there's nothing quite like putting pencil or crayon to paper and seeing pure creativity flow out, no matter your age.Read More ›

Ask the Author and Illustrator: Lost in NYC

Join us for a Kids LIVE event April 13th at the Allerton Library in the Bronx and meet the author and illustrator of Lost in NYC. We talked to them both recently about what they like to read.Read More ›

30 Days of Poetry: A Kid's Eye-View of WPA-Era New York City

The Doughnut Boy and Other Poems offers a glimpse of New York City through the eyes of a sassy little beret-wearing, doughnut-loving, public-transit-taking, library-visiting child.Read More ›

Children's Literary Salon in Retrospect: Accuracy in Illustration on March 7, 2015

Authors Mara Rockliff, Brian Floca, Sophie Blackall and editor Nicole Raymond sat down with Youth Materials Specialist Betsy Bird to discuss the idiosyncrasies of kid lit pictures. But first, they each gave a presentation about illustration and their books.Read More ›

March Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

Drawing as a form of inquiry... groundbreaking graphic designers... The U.S. a safe haven for Nazis... 1,000 years of visualizing the cosmos... a moment-by-moment account of Hurricane Sandy... the era of great American songwriting... the evolution of the painted nail...Read More ›

Children's Literary Salon in Retrospect: Collaborating Couples on February 7, 2015

Andrea and Brian Pinkney, Sean Qualls and Selina Alko, and Betsy and Ted Lewin spoke about living and working on books together.Read More ›

Learn More About Artist Carole Byard's "Rent Series"

Alexis De Veaux talks to us about Carole Byard's "Rent Series," a collection of artwork inspired by old rent receipts her late father kept in his lifelong efforts to provide housing for their family.Read More ›

Glimpses of Alice

To celebrate Lewis Carroll’s upcoming birthday—and my un-birthday!—let’s venture down the rabbit hole to explore depictions of Alice, his most famous creation, here at the library.Read More ›

Meet the Artist: Hsaio-Chi Chang

On view at the Mulberry Street Library on the Children's Floor are the whimsical illustrations of artist Hsaio-Chi Chang. Her work references known classics such as The Little Prince, as well as her own vivid imaginarium of characters inspired by animals and dreams. I spoke with the artist recently about her work. Read More ›

Podcast #40: Maira Kalman on Her Favorite Things

At a recent Books at Noon event, she spoke with us about her favorite things, including, Kantian walks, Pippi Longstocking, and Monet.Read More ›

Imagination Academy 2014 - Week 4

Our last week of Imagination Academy 2014 focused on illustration and graphic novels. Read More ›

Booktalking "Art & Max" by David Wiesner

Dinosaur and lizard minds collide in a shared attempt to create art. Arthur decides paint Max a panoply of colors that fragment and shatter all across the page!Read More ›

A Philadelphia Collaboration: The Pinto Brothers' Designs for Catherine Littlefield’s Philadelphia Ballet Company

A Philadelphia Collaboration: The Pinto Brothers’ Designs for Catherine Littlefield’s Philadelphia Ballet Company, a newly installed exhibit in Jerome Robbins Dance Division, features a variety of drawings, costume sketches and set designs by Salvatore (1905-66) and Angelo (1908-94) Pinto commissioned by Catherine Littlefield (1905-51) for the Philadelphia Ballet Company’s productions of Barn Dance and Terminal. Read More ›

Meet West Side Artist Bobbi Beck

Bobbi Beck in her studioOn view from November 4 through December 27, 2013 at the St. Agnes Library of The New York Public Library is BOBBI BECK: A West Side Visual Diary. As a longtime Upper Westsider, she has had many exhibitions at various libraries throughout New York City. The drawings are autobiographical and reflect her day-to-day observations and feelings. Her artworks convey emotional and visual renderings of humor, love, gender conflicts, marriage, family, health, joy and sorrow, anguish and global issues.

What led to your 

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The Line King's Vandamms

It has been a while since the last blog post. I have been busy with the installation and opening tours related to our final Fall exhibition, The Line Kings’ Library: Al Hirschfeld at The NYPL, which is on view in the Donald and Mary Oenslager Gallery here through January 4, 2014. It, the Vandamm exhibit and Michael Peto: Stage in 

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The Art of Drawing When One is Blind or Has Low Vision

With my hand, I touch the outside, or contour, of a small ceramic jug, a container for cream. I slowly trace the curve of the rim, continuing to the pointed lip. I put down the jug, and pick up a piece of charcoal or a soft pastel. I draw round curves, recreating what I see in my mind's eye, moving my hand across the paper, keeping pace with my inner vision.

"Jug and Green Glass," iPad drawing by Dana SimonI return to the small jug and begin again; tracing the contours of the round, squat body. But alas, when I try to return to the spot on the paper to begin 

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Drawing People and Places: Gearing Up!

At Jefferson Market Library, our 10 week drawing course for adults 55+ is drawing to a close, and we are gearing up to host an event celebrating the artists who have participated.

We will be showcasing all of the work that the students have created, on Friday May 17th from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. in our first floor auditorium. Please join us to see what has been created 

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Silhouettes, Shadows and Shades

As the new movie Hitchcock has recently come into theaters, I am reminded of the silhouette so eloquently drawn at the beginning of the television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents. Before photography was a household staple, silhouettes provided an inexpensive way to record someone's likeness. And, as with Mr. Hitchcock, a shadow is often stunning in its ability to capture the likeness of a person or 

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Creative Aging Continues to Bloom at The New York Public Library

In recent decades, much has been said about the demographic changes that New York City shares with the rest of the world. Yes, we are getting older!

One widespread response has been a surge of programs to promote creativity in mid- and later life. NYPL has happily participated in these efforts, especially since 2010 when we started partnering with Lifetime Arts Inc. to offer our first Creative Aging courses, which took place in six branch libraries. Each course was taught by a professional teaching artist 

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