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Bruce Jay Friedman, A Story Teller: Humanizing Humility

The term Black Humor was coined in the 1960s by critics who regarded him as a founder, and although Friedman admits that he was never fond of the term, it is true that he helped pioneer this darker comic tone that was grimmer than conventional satire.Read More ›

September Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

If you'd like to understand why more wild animals are venturing into urban environments; to discover how the great impressionist Monet ate; to examine the Polaroid-Kodak patent war; to celebrate the music and poetry of Leonard Cohen; to learn how to beat fatigue; to explore the economic consequences of climate change; to relive a harrowing but heroic moment in Armenian history; to argue against suicide; or learn how to cope with the narcissists in your life, please join us this month!Read More ›

Fifty Shades of Hemingway

Perhaps as much has been written about Hemingway as was written by him.Read More ›

August Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

If the mention of social media, art, birding, presidential politics, houseplants and Sinatra are enough to get your attention, this month's programs at Mid-Manhattan Library are sure to interest you. Read More ›

Booktalking "Arms Full of Love" by Delilah

Delilah is full of love, and she wants to share it with the world. Read More ›

Open Book Night II at the Outdoor Reading Room: A Reading List

That sticky summer humidity broke just in time to give us yet another gorgeous Open Book Night at the Outdoor Reading Room this past Friday night! Patrons of all ages spent the evening reclining on the lawn, enjoying a host of great recommendations, and, for the first time in 30 years, the relaxing sound of Truth and Beauty’s waters flowing nearby. Read More ›

Humans and Nature: A Reading List from Open Book Night

When we asked people to share books related to the theme of nature at our recent Open Book Night, we heard about titles related to both the natural world and to human nature, with an emphasis on humankind’s relationship to nature.Read More ›

Rock 'n' Read: Thee Oh Sees

Thee Oh Sees, fronted by John Dwyer, are a Los Angeles band whose sound has been described as garage rock, psychedelic rock, post-punk, art rock, noise… am I missing any? It's no surprise Dwyer's literary tastes are just as diverse as his band's sound. Read More ›

We Are New Yorkers: A Reading List for NYC Immigrant Heritage Week

Here are some vivid representations of the New York immigrant experience in fiction, as well as a few memoirs and biographies of New Yorkers past and present, who arrived here from all over the world and made their mark on our city. Read More ›

The Book on the Book: Biographies of Works of Literature

There has been a mini-boomlet in book biographies recently. Wouldn't you love to read a book about your favorite book?Read More ›

We Are Warriors: Biographies of Brave Women

It is March and we are again celebrating Women’s History Month. One of our bravest and most beautiful writers (who is also a woman) once wrote: “You may write me down in history / With your bitter, twisted lies, / You may trod me in the very dirt / But still, like dust, I’ll rise.” Here are the titles of biographies of brave warriors (who are also women.)Read More ›

Reader's Den: The Secret History of Wonder Woman, Part 1

Welcome to the March 2015 Reader's Den! This month we'll be reading The Secret History of Wonder Woman by feminist historian Jill Lepore. Lepore details the life story of Wonder Woman's creator, William Moulton Marston.Read More ›

Finding the Right Nonfiction Book For You

Reading nonfiction books can open your eyes to different subjects and make you see them in a new light, and I’m not just saying that because I haven’t eaten a burger from McDonald’s since I read Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser. Reading nonfiction books can change your perspective in both small and profound ways. Read More ›

Core Strength: American National Biography

American National Biography is a record of the men and women whose lives helped shape the United States—from Christopher Columbus to Addie Wyatt. The online version of ANB was released in 2000 and is updated every April and October with new entries and revisions to existing profiles.Read More ›

Page-Turners for All Tastes

Our reader asked us to recommend a good page turner for a long plane ride. Here are some titles you will want to read in one sitting from a variety of genres.Read More ›

NLS Quick Pick: Louis Armstrong, Master of Modernism by Thomas David Brothers

New biography available from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.Read More ›

Booktalking "Catch Me If You Can" by Frank Abagnale, Jr.

Frank William Abagnale, Frank Williams, or any of the other aliases he gave people, cruised through life alternately as an airplane pilot, pediatrician, civil lawyer, academic professor, and finally as a researcher/writer in what he thought was the safe haven of Montpellier, France. He bought a nice cottage there, and he brought a suitcase full of cash with him.Read More ›

Lives of the Famous and Infamous: Collective Biographies For Teens

Some of my favorite nonfiction books to recommend to teenagers are collective biographies, which provide information about different people who were famous for different reasons. They’re good for homework, good for browsing, and good for spontaneously discovering people you’ve never heard of before.Read More ›

Margot Adler 1946-2014

Remembering Margot Adler, a writer in the Allen Room.Read More ›

Booktalking "Endgame" by Frank Brady

On his sixth birthday, Robert James Fischer received a chess set from his 11-year-old sister Joan. It was the beginning of Bobby Fischer's epic journey from a poor Brooklyn school boy to a national and international chess celebrity.Read More ›
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