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Blog Posts by Subject: Performing Arts

What Would Amanda Palmer Read?

Amanda Palmer—author, performance artist, and fabulous supporter of the New York Public Library—devoted some serious time and patience to help promote children's literacy on August 20.Read More ›

HAMILTON: The Archive

In the musical Hamilton, which opened last night on Broadway, George Washington tells Alexander Hamilton, “You have no control...who tells your story.” At the New York Public Library, we preserve the artifacts that allow such stories to be told, and we have an especially strong collection of archives related to the women and men whose lives inspired the characters in the musical.Read More ›

Musical of the Month: Little Nemo

Little Nemo opened on Broadway at the opulent New Amsterdam Theatre on October 20, 1908, after a three-week tryout in Philadelphia. According to the New York Times, the city had “seen nothing bigger or better in extravaganza than ‘Little Nemo.’” It had also never seen a theatrical production more expensive.Read More ›

Running Away With the Circus

Have you ever wondered why no one ever calmly joins the circus?Read More ›

Lincoln Center Local comes to Morningside Heights

Lincoln Center Local film screenings are happening uptown: One Singular Sensation: Celebrating Marvin Hamlisch and Unsung Carolyn Leigh.Read More ›

Remembering Ruby Dee, Celebrating the American Negro Theatre

Our former pre-professional, Farrah Lopez, pays tribute to American Negro Theatre alum Ruby Dee as we celebrate its 75th anniversary. Read More ›

Finding Yiddish Music: A Quick Online Guide

Use these resources to find Yiddish music online and in libraries and archives: search for sheet music, audio recordings, catalogs, and print anthologies.Read More ›

Sinatra at the Stage Door Canteen

We have received many questions recently about this photo, the secondary key image for the exhibition.Read More ›

Across A Crowded Room: 2015 Edition

After the wildly successful 2013 edition of Across A Crowded Room, we are about to launch a second edition that is more exciting than ever before.Read More ›

African Dance Interview Project Videos Now Available

The Jerome Robbins Dance Division is pleased to announce that the five interviews documented with the Mertz Gilmore Foundation grant to record African choreographers and teachers are now online at The New York Public Library’s website.Read More ›

Matzah and Melodrama: Nahum Stutchkoff's Yiddish Song Lyrics

Nahum Stutchkoff (1893-1965) was a beloved Yiddish radio personality, playwright, lyricist and linguist who created dramas and commercials for WEVD radio and compiled a Yiddish rhyming dictionary and thesaurus. Once a household name among New York Yiddish speakers, he even appeared in ads for Beech-Nut Gum, Seagram’s Whiskey, and Planter’s High Hat Peanut Oil.Read More ›

Frank Sinatra’s Flight to the Moon

From his first job at the Rustic Cabin (earning $15 a week) to minting million dollar bills, tracing Sinatra's road to financial success.Read More ›

Great Albums You May Have Missed: Miles Davis Dark Magus (1997)

Every jazz fan has their favorite Miles period, I'm probably in the minority but I'll take his electric phase from '68-75 which expanded his amazing skills by importing the energy of rock and funk.Read More ›

Richard Attenborough's Shadowlands

Most of the articles memorializing director and actor Richard Attenborough cite his role as the nearly-mad scientist, Dr. John Hammond, in the film version of Jurassic Park or his directoral work on the film biography, Gandhi. Today, though, NPR's Morning Edition cited an interview in which Attenborough stated that his best work was the movie version of William Nicholson's play, Shadowlands.Read More ›

Robin Williams on Stage

While reading about riots in my hometown last night, I saw, out of the corner of my eye, a headline announcing the shocking death of Robin Williams. I really can add very little to the many expressions of grief from those whose for whom his films were foundational stories of childhood. Read More ›

Symphony of the New World: 50th Anniversary of a Pioneering Organization

In May 1964, two months before The Civil Rights Act (outlawing discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin) became law, noted conductor Benjamin Steinberg formed a committee of 13 musicians, 12 of whom were African American, with the intention of forming a new integrated orchestra called the Symphony of the New World (SNW).Read More ›

How Much is a TONY Worth to a Broadway Show?

In the week following the announcement of the TONY awards, the winner for best musical, Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, enjoyed its best week ever, bringing in more than $100,000 than the week before. The winner for best play, All The Way, seems to have been helped even more by the award, bringing in $200,000 more than the previous week. If it ever was in doubt, a TONY award is clearly good for business. At least if you win the big one.

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Musical of the Month: Show Boat

In the following blog post, Professor Todd Decker examines four of the early typescripts of Show Boat that can be studied at the Library for the Performing Arts. He uses the Library's call numbers to identify the four copies. There are two copies in box 5 of the Billie Burke/Florenz Ziegfeld papers, one of which was once separated from the papers under the classmark: RM7430. One is in our collection of older musical theater libretti (NCOF+) and other remains separate under classmark (RM7787). Digital images of all four copies, presented here with the kind permission of the rights Read More ›

Big Deal: Researching Bob Fosse at the Library

The life and career of Fosse, the only director to win the triple crown of show business awards in one year (an Oscar for Cabaret, a Tony Award for Pippin, and an Emmy Award for Liza With a Z—all in 1973) is well-documented through the holdings of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts (LPA) and elsewhere. Clippings, reviews, posters and lobby cards, Playbills and programs—all the standard theatrical ephemera—on Fosse's shows and films are easily available in the Billy Rose Theatre Division and Jerome Robbins Dance Division. Read More ›

Archiving Amram: The Beauty of Now

In the following blog post David Amram shares his hopes for the upcoming programs. Read More ›
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