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Blog Posts by Subject: Science

How to Access ScienceDirect

ScienceDirect is a portal to science journal articles. Find out the search refinements that will limit your results to only the articles you can access and download free at the Library.Read More ›

How to Access Science Journals and Scholarship Online

Looking for an encyclopedia of bugs you can get at home, or an idea for a chemistry experiment for a middle-schooler, or a citation to a research article in astrophysics or news of the latest trends in biotechnology? You can find most of this and more right at your local branch of The New York Public Library, or sometimes even at home.Read More ›

Summer of STEM

Scientifically minded kids have some great new nonfiction titles to choose from when they’re looking for a summer read.Read More ›

Learning about Genetic Engineering, Modification, and Enhancement

Genetic concepts and terminology can readily be found in today’s headlines and conversation. These phrases and concepts are often used interchangeably, but have distinctive meanings and emphasis.Read More ›

Salute to Narrative Nonfiction: Science

Narrative or creative nonfiction is a somewhat newly recognized genre. Naturally, as librarians we have a great appreciation for the research, the primary source documents and interviews, but it is the narrative, the skillful pacing, the phrasing, and the insight that make it read like a thriller that set these books apart from other nonfiction.Read More ›

We Blinded Them With Science: Experiments for Children

Learning about science with books from the library and experimental programs at the library!Read More ›

Quantum Leap, Do You Copy? Goodbye Leonard Nimoy

The best place to find the answers to existential, scientific, and any other deep questions you're pondering is, of course, the Library.Read More ›

7 Amazing Facts and Books About Female Science Pioneers

Although it's true that women are underrepresented in STEM fields, female scientists have been making breakthroughs for centuries. Here are some facts you may not have known about incredible female scientists—and the books about them that you must read.Read More ›

Beautiful Oops! Finding Success in Mistakes

Did you ever consider the notion that mistakes might be a gateway to ingenuity that can propel further breakthroughs, rather than mere blunders? Here is a list of reading recommendations that might help you start to view mistakes in a new light.Read More ›

Weather Forecasters: Summer's Unsung Heroes

The following is the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor Tom Perez's blog post, Weather Forecasters: Summer's Unsung Heroes.Read More ›

Putting a New Spin on STEM

Books for kids and teens that tie into STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) are all the rage nowadays. Here is a list of books for kids and teens that are related to those subjects but which you’ll find in some unexpected areas of the library -- fiction, graphic novels, and poetry!Read More ›

Summer Science Clubs!

Join the New York Public Library as we collaborate with the Children's Museum of Manhattan for the Summer Reading Challenge's Science Clubs! Educators will lead weekly workshops exploring simple machines and their unique functions.Read More ›

Valentina Tereshkova: The Anniversary of the First Woman in Space

It was 51 years ago to the day, June 16th, 1963, that Valentina Tereshkova left the earth aboard the Vostok 6, and became the first woman to enter outer space.Read More ›

NYS Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Incentive Program

The NYS STEM Incentive Program provides a full SUNY or CUNY tuition scholarship for the top 10 percent of students in each New York State high school if they pursue a STEM degree in an associates or bachelor degree program and agree to work in a STEM field in New York State for 5 years after graduation.Read More ›

STEM Comics: Saving Students One Thought Bubble at a Time

If only Manga Math had existed when I struggled through Calculus. The only solace at that time was the introduction of the high tech (for its era) graphing calculator.Read More ›

Inspired by "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey:" A Science Reading List For Kids

Have you been captivated by Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, the recent follow-up to Carl Sagan's seminal documentary series Cosmos: A Personal Voyage? Me too. While the engaging style would likely draw in high school and perhaps middle grade students, it might be a bit too advanced for the younger crowd, despite some amazing visuals and animations. But why wait to introduce them to basic concept of the world, nay, cosmos they live in? History, nature, and the scientific method can really activate an imagination, stimulate curiosity, and provoke inquiry.Read More ›

Kids Science Experiment: Elephant Toothpaste

On a snowy Saturday at the branch a few kids came out to try a cool experiment I'd been talking about all week. ELEPHANT TOOTHPASTE!! Too cool.

This exciting experiment is a great example of a reaction that occurs when you combine certain chemicals together (kid-friendly of course). 

At first I decided to give the experiment a test run and as a result I didn’t get the reaction I was quite looking for. Something I used was off. Well it was the bottle I used. It was just too big (2 liter soda bottle).

Learning from my mistake, I decided to do the experiment 

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Kids Science: Make Your Own Lava Lamp

School’s back in session and with it a continued enthusiasm for learning ever after classes are out.

Last Monday at 115th Street’s bi-weekly Science Monday, kids (and some parents) came out to try their hand at some scientific and artistic experimentation.

Remember lava lamps? Those lights filled with glow-in-the-dark liquid and colorful globs of goo? Our younger participants recognized them immediately and were eager to see if they could create their own versions simply using items found in most households.

We used clear containers (with a 

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There's Gold in Them Thar Hills: Digging at the Webster Library

For Webster Library's second big "Dig into Reading" event of the summer, we celebrated digging of all kinds (if you missed our worm races, check them out).

For this program, we separated our room into four main areas:

Paleontologist: Search for laminated dinosaur bones in a kiddie pool filled with packing peanuts. Geologist: Fizzing rocks that dissolve in vinegar to reveal a prize. Paleontologist (part II): ... Read More ›

Fortifying Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Education in New York City

As President Obama is leading our nation in an education reform to Race to the Top and Educate to Innovate, Mayor Bloomberg of the Big Apple is following suit in raising the education standards of K-12 school students by implementing more effective teaching and learning programs. Fortifying STEM education with a focus on the knowledge and skills for the jobs of the future is also an important aspect on the agenda of Bloomberg's 

... Read More ›
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