Click to search the Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library Skip Navigation

Blog Posts by Subject: Education

The ABC of Education: Why Libraries Matter

As I recruit a team of educators for The New York Public Library’s rapidly expanding Education Department, I consistently hear from candidates about how formative the public library was in their childhoods. Most of us remember after-school and weekend trips to the library to check out books, and the great feeling of hanging out in a space devoted to the quiet pursuit of reading and lifelong learning.

Today’s libraries, however, are more than just a space to read. They are undergoing a metamorphosis in their support of literacy and education across all stages of life, 

... Read More ›

Closing the Opportunity Divide: Year Up New York

Almost 6 million young people (that's almost 15 percent of those aged 16 to 24) are neither in school nor working, according to the Opportunity Nation Coalition report. These young adults have a lot of talent but without the opportunity for post secondary education and without access to the economic mainstream. On the other side 14 million jobs requiring post secondary education will go unfulfilled in the next decade.

Year Up is an 

... Read More ›

Supporting Our Students

Tony MarxThe NYPL has 20,000 kids who visit our neighborhood branches every day. Some days as a kid in Inwood, I was one of those.  

For some of these students, our branches are a place to do homework or attend programs. For others, they are comfortable places to hang out with their friends or use the computers. And for all of them, the library provides a place to stay safe after school.

Our library system serves a unique function in the lives of students that cannot be understated. Knowing this, NYPL, along with the Brooklyn and 

... Read More ›

Classroom Connections: World War II and the Double V Campaign (Gr. 10-12)

"The Pittsburgh Courier drew its inspiration for the Double V campaign from a letter by James G. Thompson of Wichita, Kansas, published in the January 31, 1942 issue. Thompson, in his letter titled 'Should I Sacrifice to Live 'Half American?',' advocated for a 'double VV' for a dual victory over enemies to the country and enemies—opposed to equality, justice, and democracy—at home. In its next issue, on February 7, the Courier displayed Double V drawings emphasizing the theme 'Democracy, At Home, Abroad.' The paper announced the Double V campaign the next week, declaring 

... Read More ›

Classroom Connections: 'New York, Then & Now' Immigration to Washington Heights/Inwood (Gr. 6-8)

The story of immigration to America is a rich tapestry whose opposing threads, oddly for how much they reject each other's reality, hang together as one. It outrages us and gives us hope in frighteningly equal measure.

Nowhere is this truer than New York City, a city of extremes in every sense. The community known as Washington Heights/Inwood originally spanned from 135th Street north to the top end of Manhattan Island, surrounded by the Hudson River on the west and the East River with Spuyten Duyvil's deadly currents in between. Its land is the highest ground in 

... Read More ›

MyLibraryNYC: Featured Book Sets Gr. 6-12

Available NOW and ready to borrow for teachers in the MyLibraryNYC school-library initiative:  Grades 6-8 Science: Tracking Trash: Flotsam, Jetsam, And The Science Of Ocean Motion - 3 sets available ... Read More ›

MyLibraryNYC: Featured Book Sets Gr. K-5

Available NOW and ready to borrow for teachers in the MyLibraryNYC school-library initiative: 

Grades K-1 Science: Natural Disasters - 2 sets available  Science: Life Cycles 'Where Do Polar Bears Live?'... Read More ›

Classroom Connections: The Role of Social Darwinism in European Imperialism (Gr. 9-10)

In order to provide 9th and 10th grade students an opportunity to explore this topic further, we have assembled a collection of primary and secondary source readings to be analyzed and discussed as part of common core-aligned Social Studies units on either the "New Imperialism" of the 19th century or the rise of Fascism in the 20th century.Read More ›

#TeachNYPL Pinterest Board

Did you know that we're on Pinterest?

Check out our Pinterest Board—TeachNYPL—for educational resources from the New York Public Library including:

Finds from the Archives—letters from Harry Houdini to NYPL President John Shaw Billings, Civil War diaries, the infamous Newgate Calendar (the 'chronicles of ... Read More ›

Classroom Connections: 'Two Wars,' African Americans, Emancipation, and the American Revolution (Gr. 6-8)

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.”—Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776

The American Revolution symbolizes a critical moment in the history of the United States, and the Declaration of Independence is the key symbol of that moment. With its rhetoric of freedom and equality, the Declaration of Independence inspired the colonists to courageously fight for their rights. 

... Read More ›

Classroom Connections: 'Grace Aguilar's American Journey,' A Common Core-aligned Research Experience (Gr. 11-12)

By 1900, New York City and the United States were undergoing waves of dramatic, traumatic change. Industrialization, Reconstruction and a surge of immigrants from across the globe were remaking every aspect of life, from transportation to education, leisure, labor, race relations and the status of women. One response to the dislocations and turmoil of this era was the reform efforts that we now classify as the “Progressive Movement.”

... Read More ›

Children's Theater in New York City

A patron wrote in to ASK NYPL, the virtual reference service of The New York Public Library, to find out about the state of children's theater in New York City. More specifically, the patron wanted to know the total number of children age 6-11 in each of the five boroughs of the City; the various theaters in the City that feature children's 

... Read More ›

Classroom Connections: 'Little Lionhearts,' Young People in African-American Civil Rights Protests (Gr. 6-8)

"I could not move because history had me glued to the seat. It felt like Sojourner Truth's hands were pushing down on one shoulder, and Harriet Tubman's hand pushing down on another shoulder" —Claudette Colvin (Interview on Democracy Now, March 2013)

As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, and when we typically consider the 

... Read More ›

Classroom Connections: Lists for Lesson Planning (Gr. 6-12)

Aguilar Library, 1938 - Librarian w/ students. Want to know more about our current educational initiatives? See The ABC of Education: Why Libraries Matter by Maggie Jacobs, Director of Educational ProgramsWe have just shuttered the doors on our first Education Innovation @ NYPL Summer Institute. During this three week Institute, master teachers from NYC (and further afar) met curators from our Research 

... Read More ›

Classroom Connections: The Underground Railroad to Canada (Gr. 6-8)

"I left the States for Canada, for rights, freedom, liberty. I came to Buxton [Ontario] to educate my children" —Henry Johnson (pp. 307 A North-side View of Slavery: The Refugee, Or, The Narratives of Fugitive Slaves in Canada)

Additional Resources for Further Reading Expanded Text List - Slavery ... Read More ›

A Public Health Career in Two Years: Community Health

What is Public Health?

If you've ever had a vaccination, assumed the water from your tap is safe, taken your baby to a clinic for a checkup, expected the restaurant you eat in to be clean and safe, been screened for tuberculosis, HIV or a sexually transmitted disease, wondered how to avoid getting Lyme disease, or what to eat to stay healthy, then you've been touched by the efforts of public health employees.

Public health protects and improves communities by preventing epidemics and the spread of disease, promoting healthy lifestyles for children and 

... Read More ›

Free Education and Job Training: Job Corps

Job Corps is the nation's largest career technical training and education program for young people ages 16 through 24 that qualify as low income. A voluntary program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor, Job Corps provides eligible young men and women with an opportunity to gain the experience they need to begin a career or advance to higher education.

Job Corps offers hands-on training in more than 100 career technical areas, including: automotive and machine repair, construction, finance and business services, 

... Read More ›

Institute for Teachers Aug 5-23, 2013: Primary Sources and the Common Core

Love history? Original archival documents? Looking for new ways to incorporate primary source materials into your lesson plans? 

NYPL is searching for you! We are looking for innovative master teachers at the middle and high school level for a new 3 week collaborative summer exploration program based at The New York Public Library's flagship Stephen A. Schwarzman Building at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue.

The Education Innovation @ NYPL Summer Institute will take place August 5-23 (Monday-Friday 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. for 3 weeks). 

 

... Read More ›

Fortifying Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Education in New York City

As President Obama is leading our nation in an education reform to Race to the Top and Educate to Innovate, Mayor Bloomberg of the Big Apple is following suit in raising the education standards of K-12 school students by implementing more effective teaching and learning programs. Fortifying STEM education with a focus on the knowledge and skills for the jobs of the future is also an important aspect on the agenda of Bloomberg's 

... Read More ›

Get the Facts: GED Changes in 2014

The GED® test is changing on January 1, 2014.

After January 1, scores from previous tests will be invalid and cannot be combined with any new test scores.

If you have taken the test since January 1, 2002 and want your scores to count, you must complete the series and pass the test before 2014.

If you're a New York City resident between 17-24 years old who has previously taken the GED® test and would like free assistance to complete in 2013:

Visit GEDCompass.org Call 718-557-2525 Text GED ... Read More ›
Previous Page 2 of 7 Next