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Blog Posts by Subject: Education

Booktalking "Higher Education?" by Andrew Hacker and Claudia Dreifus

All of the talk these days is about the rising cost of tertiary education. Is it really necessary for so many people to go to college? Ever wonder why exactly college costs are so astronomically high?Read More ›

STEM Comics: Saving Students One Thought Bubble at a Time

If only Manga Math had existed when I struggled through Calculus. The only solace at that time was the introduction of the high tech (for its era) graphing calculator.Read More ›

TASC Resources: Find Free Classes and Test Prep for the High School Equivalency Exam (Formerly GED)

New York State has selected a new high school equivalency test called the Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC) to replace the General Educational Development (GED) as the primary pathway to a New York State High School Equivalency Diploma effective January 2, 2014.Read More ›

Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder: Art Class at the Library

Whether you are the parent of a budding Picasso or a child who imbues the term "abstract art" with new meaning, the library is sure to have resources to support his or her creative pursuits.Read More ›

Education and Employment Resources for Women

Did you know that besides the Federal Student Aid that both men and women can apply for when enrolling in college there are scholarships for women and single parents as listed below? Remember, you should never have to pay to search or apply for scholarships. Follow these tips to avoid scams.Read More ›

Court Officer Trainee: Prepare for 2014 Exam

Information about the exam and how to prepare using books and electronic resources at the library.Read More ›

The Jefferson Market University: Spring 2014

The Jefferson Market Library is pleased to offer the following free courses for the spring semester, 2014.Read More ›

U.S. Census Bureau: Measuring Alternative Educational Credentials

In January 2014, the U.S. Census Bureau released a report, Measuring Alternative Educational Credentials: 2012, which examines the prevalence of non-degree certifications and licenses among American workers and their importance to the employment market.Read More ›

MyLibraryNYC: Simultaneous Use eBooks - Copies Always Available!

Available NOW and ready to borrow for educators and students in the MyLibraryNYC school-library initiative:Read More ›

Diary of a Volunteer at the Aguilar Adult Learning Center

A guest post by Leslie Gilstrap.

Some people are surprised to learn that adults don't know how to read. "How can this be?", they ask. How is it possible that someone can hold down a job or take care of a family if he or she doesn't know how to read? How does he travel on subways and buses, shop for groceries or visit a doctor's office without knowing what all of the signs, advertisements and paper forms mean?

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MyLibraryNYC: Classroom Reading Sets Available

Available NOW and ready to borrow for educators and students in the MyLibraryNYC school-library initiative—exemplar texts, primary source material, memoirs, and award winning fiction for use in your classroom (Gr. 4-12).

Classroom Reading Sets (30+ copies of a single title) Gr. 4-5

Deep, Dark, Dangerous by Mary Downing Hahn

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Homeschooling at the Library: Algebra Problems

Algebra Problems. Or should I call them challenges? The past few months have been pretty challenging for both my son who is learning algebra, and for me who has to teach it to him. Once again, the the library comes to the rescue!

This summer we hit a snag so I turned to the library for assistance. We were doing well with Pre-Algebra in Life of Fred last year when we came to word problems. My son's eyes glazed over. I was losing him. Math was no longer fun. Now it was hard work and he wasn't 

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Closing the Opportunity Divide: Year Up New York

Almost 6 million young people (that's almost 15 percent of those aged 16 to 24) are neither in school nor working, according to the Opportunity Nation Coalition report. These young adults have a lot of talent but without the opportunity for post secondary education and without access to the economic mainstream. On the other side 14 million jobs requiring post secondary education will go unfulfilled in the next decade.

Year Up is an 

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Supporting Our Students

Tony MarxThe NYPL has 20,000 kids who visit our neighborhood branches every day. Some days as a kid in Inwood, I was one of those.  

For some of these students, our branches are a place to do homework or attend programs. For others, they are comfortable places to hang out with their friends or use the computers. And for all of them, the library provides a place to stay safe after school.

Our library system serves a unique function in the lives of students that cannot be understated. Knowing this, NYPL, along with the Brooklyn and 

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Classroom Connections: World War II and the Double V Campaign (Gr. 10-12)

"The Pittsburgh Courier drew its inspiration for the Double V campaign from a letter by James G. Thompson of Wichita, Kansas, published in the January 31, 1942 issue. Thompson, in his letter titled 'Should I Sacrifice to Live 'Half American?',' advocated for a 'double VV' for a dual victory over enemies to the country and enemies—opposed to equality, justice, and democracy—at home. In its next issue, on February 7, the Courier displayed Double V drawings emphasizing the theme 'Democracy, At Home, Abroad.' The paper announced the Double V campaign the next week, declaring 

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Classroom Connections: 'New York, Then & Now' Immigration to Washington Heights/Inwood (Gr. 6-8)

The story of immigration to America is a rich tapestry whose opposing threads, oddly for how much they reject each other's reality, hang together as one. It outrages us and gives us hope in frighteningly equal measure.

Nowhere is this truer than New York City, a city of extremes in every sense. The community known as Washington Heights/Inwood originally spanned from 135th Street north to the top end of Manhattan Island, surrounded by the Hudson River on the west and the East River with Spuyten Duyvil's deadly currents in between. Its land is the highest ground in 

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MyLibraryNYC: Featured Book Sets Gr. 6-12

Available NOW and ready to borrow for teachers in the MyLibraryNYC school-library initiative:  Grades 6-8 Science: Tracking Trash: Flotsam, Jetsam, And The Science Of Ocean Motion - 3 sets available ... Read More ›

MyLibraryNYC: Featured Book Sets Gr. K-5

Available NOW and ready to borrow for teachers in the MyLibraryNYC school-library initiative: 

Grades K-1 Science: Natural Disasters - 2 sets available  Science: Life Cycles 'Where Do Polar Bears Live?'... Read More ›

Classroom Connections: The Role of Social Darwinism in European Imperialism (Gr. 9-10)

In order to provide 9th and 10th grade students an opportunity to explore this topic further, we have assembled a collection of primary and secondary source readings to be analyzed and discussed as part of common core-aligned Social Studies units on either the "New Imperialism" of the 19th century or the rise of Fascism in the 20th century.Read More ›

#TeachNYPL Pinterest Board

Did you know that we're on Pinterest?

Check out our Pinterest Board—TeachNYPL—for educational resources from the New York Public Library including:

Finds from the Archives—letters from Harry Houdini to NYPL President John Shaw Billings, Civil War diaries, the infamous Newgate Calendar (the 'chronicles of ... Read More ›
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