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Blog Posts by Subject: Disabilities and Accessibility

Oral Histories of the Disability Experience: Share Your Story

The Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library is launching an oral history project that will be the largest community-based effort of its kind to collect and document stories of the disability experience, and we want you to share your story.Read More ›

Making an Accessible Accessibility Resource Fair at the Andrew Heiskell Library

Andrew Heiskell Library hosted the first Technology, Culture, and Community Fair for People who are Blind, Visually Impaired, or Physically Disabled, welcoming 32 vendors, 16 featured speakers, and over 200 attendees.Read More ›

Disability Employment Champions of Change

This is the Department of Labor blog post authored by Kathy Martinez, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy.Read More ›

Working Together to Promote Inclusive Workplaces

Unite magazine, a bi-monthly lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) business publication, featured Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez in an article "Working Together to Promote Inclusive Workplaces" in its October/November issue. Read More ›

Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library: An Insider Look

This library provides services for blind customers in all five boroughs of New York City and Long Island.Read More ›

Employing Individuals with Autism: Information and Customized Employment Ideas April 10

Autism Speaks and Job Path will present Employing Individuals with Autism: Information and Customized Employment Ideas on Thursday, April 10, 2014, 2 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. at the Science, Industry and Business Library (SIBL), 188 Madison Avenue and 34th Street, Conference Room 018.Read More ›

AAPD Summer Internship Program Applications Due February 5, 2014

The following information is from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy.

The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) has announced its Summer Internship Program. The program is open to college students, graduate students, recent graduates (within one year), or veterans who self-identify as an individual with any type of disability.

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Fulbrighter at the Library: Fotis Flevotomos Studies the Connection Between Art and Vision

Fotis Flevotomos, still frame from the video "Looking for a Face"I first met Fotis Flevotomos in June 2011. He had come to New York from Greece to speak on his creative process at The New York Public Library's Low Vision and Blindness Resource Fair. An experienced artist, he was able to do so many things with ease—produce art; pack, transport, and display art; speak articulately about his work as a panelist; and even find a reasonably-priced place to stay in midtown 

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National Disability Employment Awareness Month: Ideas for Educators and Youth Service Professionals

Job hunting for youth has been increasingly challenging in recent years as there are more experienced, educated adults who have become unemployed as a result of the recession and are seeking employment. The Youth Employment Rate is especially low for youth with disabilities as reported in the Current Popluation Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of households conducted by the U.S. Censue Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

In an effort to raise awareness on disability employment for youth, 

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Design for a Lifetime, or: "What Do We Do About the Bathtub?"

Would you consider New York City "age-friendly"? That is, is it a place where people of all ages—including the very old—can feel comfortable, safe, and happy?

One million people aged 65 and over call New York City home, and a half-million more are expected to swell those ranks by 2030. New York City's top-notch public transportation system and rich access to cultural institutions contribute toward making it a place where these folk will want to stay; most are not planning to leave for southerly climes anytime soon, if ever.

 

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My Library: The Incredible Resources of the Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library

A few years ago, after I was diagnosed at age 47 with Stargardt disease (juvenile macular degeneration), I discovered that it was becoming increasingly difficult for me to read print. Things which I had always taken for granted such as visually scanning the headlines of a newspaper, reviewing my written financial statements and checking out the onscreen guide on my television set all caused my eyes to strain almost immediately. I could still see the print, but not without considerable discomfort. How would I be able to manage 

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Diverse Perspectives: People with Disabilities Fulfilling Your Business Goals

The following article provides invaluable information on the inclusion of people with disabilities in the workforce and in the marketplace. It is a publication of the United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy.

By fostering a culture of diversity, or a capacity to appreciate and value individual differences, in all aspects of their operations, employers benefit from varied perspectives on how to confront business challenges and achieve 

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August Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

What is it like to be a convicted murderer just released from prison? What company was the Apple of the 1960s and 70s? Can you forage for edible plants in New York City? How much do you know about life in

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Art Exhibition Featuring Artists from AHRC NYC at Hudson Park

AHRC New York City's Adult Day Centers offer adults with disabilities a variety of services and opportunities. Using a person-centered approach, individualized and creative supports are offered to achieve meaningful goals based on the person's strengths and preferences. Providing individualized supports includes respect to personal choices and responsiveness to the person's unique needs.

Art consultant Catherine Rosamond wants the artists in the Betty Pendler New York 

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The Art of Drawing When One is Blind or Has Low Vision

With my hand, I touch the outside, or contour, of a small ceramic jug, a container for cream. I slowly trace the curve of the rim, continuing to the pointed lip. I put down the jug, and pick up a piece of charcoal or a soft pastel. I draw round curves, recreating what I see in my mind's eye, moving my hand across the paper, keeping pace with my inner vision.

"Jug and Green Glass," iPad drawing by Dana SimonI return to the small jug and begin again; tracing the contours of the round, squat body. But alas, when I try to return to the spot on the paper to begin 

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Sports for All: Find Out What Sport Is Right for You!

Here we are in the middle of spring; and I'm still embarrassingly waffling over which sport I should focus on in the beautiful weather. I've once again missed my opportunity to do cross-country skiing. Perhaps table tennis will be within reach for me this summer...

Though I myself am a bit indecisive, I love the idea of each of us finding at least one sport or other athletic activity that's fun and right for us, and participating on a regular basis.

To this end, several libraries have hosted 50+ Fitness Fairs in the past, in

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Between Two Worlds: Memoirs by Children of Deaf Adults

How do you celebrate Deaf History Month?Alice L. Hagemeyer, Photo by Ricardo Lopez

As a librarian, during this month I usually spend some time thinking admiring thoughts about Alice L. Hagemeyer, whose energy, spirit, and determination propelled service to the Deaf in libraries in Washington, D.C., where she worked for 34 years, and nationwide. Perhaps you would like to celebrate the month, which spans March 13-April 15 each year, by investigating some of the primary sources from the annals of Deaf history and 

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Art and Low Vision: The Sound of Monet’s Weeping Willow Series

Hear the audio version of this blog post. Narration: Kevin Gillins. Music performed by La Capella Reial de Catalunya; Le Concert des Nations; conductor: Jordi Savall.

I am looking at Monet's Weeping Willow series and want to describe these works to people who cannot see. I think music, with its sensual and dramatic language will most elegantly convey the power of these works.

In 1791, Mozart composed in Vienna parts of what is now known as the Requiem Mass in D Minor (K. 626). 

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For People with Disabilities: A Ticket to Work

According to the U.S. Social Security Administration, more than 13 million working-age people in the U.S. receive Social Security disability benefits; that's almost one in every 15 adults. Some may consider returning to work, but have important concerns regarding health care, cash benefits, job placement and job accommodations. The good news is that Social Security's Ticket to Work program that supports career development for people with disabilities is here to 

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Harnessing the Power of Music

Oliver Sacks once said in his book, Musicophilia:

"The power of music whether joyous or cathartic must steal on one unawares, come spontaneously as a blessing or a grace..."

Music has incredible power. People today listen to music all the time, walking down streets and sitting in subway cars. We can't escape music.

For many of us, certain songs have this mystical power of throwing us into the past to a certain time and place. It might be a wonderful memory or a memory we 

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