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Blog Posts by Subject: Nonfiction

Booktalking "A Year at the Races" by Jane Smiley

Some horses are driven and ambitious just as some people are so focused and determined to achieve success. For example, Secretariat displayed those qualities. They are interested in their work and they try to improve for themselves, not simply for the trainer's approval. They are less distractible. Horses have different athletic inclinations and preferences for certain kinds of work (e.g., trail riding, eventing, dressage, barrel racing, etc.)Read More ›

Booktalking "The Horses in My Life" by Monty Roberts

Monty Roberts was riding horses at a walk, trot, and canter as a 3-year-old boy. He vaguely remembers people saying, "He's only three, and look at him ride!"Read More ›

Our Favorite, Most Absorbing, Compelling, and Pleasurable [True!] Tales of New York City

The Milstein Division of United States History, Local History & Genealogy recommends our favorite, most readable, most memorable New York City nonfiction. These are the true stories of New York that engaged us, that intrigued us, and that we thought you might like to read as well.Read More ›

Booktalking "Higher Education?" by Andrew Hacker and Claudia Dreifus

All of the talk these days is about the rising cost of tertiary education. Is it really necessary for so many people to go to college? Ever wonder why exactly college costs are so astronomically high?Read More ›

Three Reads: Bad Guys of Gilded Age New York

Here are three books about some of our fine city's bad guys, lying, cheating, and stealing their way through the 1890s.Read More ›

STEM Comics: Saving Students One Thought Bubble at a Time

If only Manga Math had existed when I struggled through Calculus. The only solace at that time was the introduction of the high tech (for its era) graphing calculator.Read More ›

Book Notes From The Underground: April 2014

Here are some new noteworthy titles that may or may not be receiving the attention they deserve.Read More ›

Booktalking "Meet the Dancers" by Amy Nathan

Want to "get in the groove" and discover what it takes to be a pro dancer? Read More ›

March Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

A new approach to health care reform ... 20 years of Harlem Street Portraits ... humanist architecture ... The Extreme Life of the Sea ... New York City's unbuilt subways ... mothers ... the power of storytelling ... a century of candy ... New York's lost amusement parks ... the public library ... 11 missing men of WWII ... great city planning.Read More ›

February Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

Who was Miss Anne in 1920s Harlem? How did George Washington define the American presidency? What is keeping a majority of Americans from eating well? Can the world’s most endangered big cat be saved? How can we improve brain performance at any age? What fascinating stories does Murray Hill have to tell? Find out at Mid-Manhattan this month!Read More ›

Reality Rules! 2014 Nonfiction Award Winners - Youth Media Awards

The Youth Media Awards were just announced during the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Conference in Philadelphia. Two of the award specifically honor nonfiction - the Sibert Medal and the YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction.Read More ›

January Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

A mystical history of NYC below Chambers Street… the link between our financial and environmental crises… the life and photographs of Ansel Adams… our

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December Author @ the Library Programs and More at Mid-Manhattan

Have you ever wondered what happens when a ghetto is unmade? Or what the future of Saudi Arabia means to the rest of the world? Or how overachievers do it? Do you think you know what real New Yorkers look like? Do you want to believe that

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November Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

Is Detroit City really the place to be? What happens in a typical day at a busy NYC hospital? How does a traveler lose himself all over the globe? Is it possible for the government to achieve full employment in 

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Booktalking "The Murder Business" by Mark Fuhrman

Mark Fuhrman investigated OJ Simpson's murder, along with his partner, Brad Roberts, who recovered more evidence than him, yet he was never questioned on the stand at the murder trial.Read More ›

Looking for a Good Book? Try an Award-Winning Read

Each year multiple literary prizes are awarded to recognize the works of great writers. Some of these awards are well known and much anticipated like the prestigious Nobel Prize for Literature, while others are lesser known. Here is a list of some of the more popular literary awards given out this year.

The Nobel Prize for Literature was established in 1901 at the bequest of Alfred Nobel (Swedish chemist, engineer, innovator and inventor of dynamite). It is awarded by the Swedish Academy in 

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Booktalking "Anyone You Want Me to Be: A True Story of Sex and Death on the Internet" by John E. Douglas

Luckily for criminals and unluckily for the rest of us, the advent of the Internet provided a new trolling ground for serial killers to scroll for victims. Millions of people are available at the click of a mouse on Internet dating sites. Easier, perhaps, then cruising the streets on the hunt. Easier to present a likeable, easy-going, good-guy image 

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Thank You for Your Service, by David Finkel

Thank you for your service. That phrase, the dust jacket; everyone can recognize immediately the title of this book is ironic. Or...is it?

Thank You for Your Service, the latest book from author David Finkel, is about the after-war. Everyone knows the wars: 

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Booktalking "Listen to the Wind" by Greg Mortenson and Susan Roth

The kids of Korphe, a village in Pakistan, lived in a very do-it-yourself environment. They were a society of farmers and weavers. The people made their own clothes and produced their own food. The kids even made their own toys. Prior to having a school, they held classes outside and drew lines in the dirt with sticks. So it comes as no surprise that the people of Korphe were able to 

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September Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

The centrality of sunshine… the most fascinating New York Times obits of the year… the riddle of the

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