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Blog Posts by Subject: Nonfiction

July Reader's Den: "Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and the People Who Play It" by David Ewalt Part 2

Of Dice and Men is essentially a history of Dungeons and Dragons, but it also seeks to explain gaming to the non-gamer or the curious. Read More ›

Book Notes From The Underground: July 2014

Here are some new noteworthy titles that may or may not be receiving the attention they deserve:Read More ›

July Reader's Den: "Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and the People Who Play It" by David Ewalt

In Of Dice and Men, David Ewalt recounts the development of Dungeons & Dragons from its roots in the games of the Ancient World and 19th Century Europe, through its many incarnations and editions and the hysteria that came with it, to its current incarnation in video games.Read More ›

Booktalking "Gifted Grown Ups" by Marylou Kelly Streznewski

Gifted children are considered special education students: smarter than 95% of the population, with an IQ (Intelligence Quotient) of 130 or higher. An IQ of 100 denotes average intelligence. There are also qualitative measures of people's abilities. Howard Gardner conceptualizes people's strengths in terms of multiple intelligences. Gifted adults are also characterized by quick mental speed, sophistication of thought, high levels of sensitivity, drive, and a sense of humor.Read More ›

July Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

Gangsters and true crime, New York City history, financial literacy, MacArthur, FDR, Khrushchev, Lindsay, Main Street, U.S.A., travel, learning and self-discovery, climate change, foreign policy, the collective afterlife, and great pizza are among the wide-ranging topics coming up at our Author @ the Library talks in July 2014! We hope you’ll join us for insightful discussions with the authors of these 

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June 2014 Reader's Den: "The Judgment of Paris" by Ross King, Part 3

Other recommended works:

The Girl Who Loved Camellias by Julie Kavanagh The fascinating history of Marie DuPlessis chronicles the life of the courtesan who inspired Alexandre Dumas fils’s novel and play La dame aux camélias, Giuseppe Verdi’s opera La Traviata, George Cukor’s film Camille, and Frederick 

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June 2014 Reader's Den: "The Judgment of Paris" by Ross King, Part 1

Welcome back to the Reader's Den! This month we'll be looking at The Judgment of Paris by Ross King, about a turbulent era in art history.Read More ›

June Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

The rise and fall of the atomic era… achieving financial independence... legendary actor Stella Adler… millennia of Egyptomania… an exile’s return to Bosnia… Tammany Hall, a birthplace of progressive urban politics… the discovery of logic ... the art of quitting… tracking the New York art world… the history of the world’s most influential spice… blood libel in Tsarist Russia… imagining a socialist USA … bad English… the approaching death of money… dueling neurosurgeons... Read More ›

Uncovering the Truth: Helen Bernstein Book Award 2014

Each year since 1988, the Library has awarded Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism to a journalist for a work of in-depth, investigative reporting. Over 100 non-fiction books were nominated this year, all of them read, discussed and vetted by a Library Review Committee. These are the five amazing books the group chose as this years five finalists—all must-reads!Read More ›

Book Notes From The Underground: May 2014

Here are some new noteworthy titles that may or may not be receiving the attention they deserve. Read More ›

Booktalking "A Year at the Races" by Jane Smiley

Some horses are driven and ambitious just as some people are so focused and determined to achieve success. For example, Secretariat displayed those qualities. They are interested in their work and they try to improve for themselves, not simply for the trainer's approval. They are less distractible. Horses have different athletic inclinations and preferences for certain kinds of work (e.g., trail riding, eventing, dressage, barrel racing, etc.)Read More ›

Booktalking "The Horses in My Life" by Monty Roberts

Monty Roberts was riding horses at a walk, trot, and canter as a 3-year-old boy. He vaguely remembers people saying, "He's only three, and look at him ride!"Read More ›

Our Favorite, Most Absorbing, Compelling, and Pleasurable [True!] Tales of New York City

The Milstein Division of United States History, Local History & Genealogy recommends our favorite, most readable, most memorable New York City nonfiction. These are the true stories of New York that engaged us, that intrigued us, and that we thought you might like to read as well.Read More ›

Booktalking "Higher Education?" by Andrew Hacker and Claudia Dreifus

All of the talk these days is about the rising cost of tertiary education. Is it really necessary for so many people to go to college? Ever wonder why exactly college costs are so astronomically high?Read More ›

Three Reads: Bad Guys of Gilded Age New York

Here are three books about some of our fine city's bad guys, lying, cheating, and stealing their way through the 1890s.Read More ›

STEM Comics: Saving Students One Thought Bubble at a Time

If only Manga Math had existed when I struggled through Calculus. The only solace at that time was the introduction of the high tech (for its era) graphing calculator.Read More ›

Book Notes From The Underground: April 2014

Here are some new noteworthy titles that may or may not be receiving the attention they deserve.Read More ›

Booktalking "Meet the Dancers" by Amy Nathan

Want to "get in the groove" and discover what it takes to be a pro dancer? Read More ›

March Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

A new approach to health care reform ... 20 years of Harlem Street Portraits ... humanist architecture ... The Extreme Life of the Sea ... New York City's unbuilt subways ... mothers ... the power of storytelling ... a century of candy ... New York's lost amusement parks ... the public library ... 11 missing men of WWII ... great city planning.Read More ›

February Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

Who was Miss Anne in 1920s Harlem? How did George Washington define the American presidency? What is keeping a majority of Americans from eating well? Can the world’s most endangered big cat be saved? How can we improve brain performance at any age? What fascinating stories does Murray Hill have to tell? Find out at Mid-Manhattan this month!Read More ›
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