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Blog Posts by Subject: Internet

February 2012 NYPL Blog Highlights

Did you feel the love this month on the NYPL Blogs?

We love bestsellers. We love Novedades. We love art. We love movies. We love ... Read More ›

I Love Reading: Bookmark This Post

This month in the eReading Room I shared with you some of the ways that voracious readers are able to adapt their reading habits to the online environment. I explained differences between e-formats, the best ways to manage both short and long reads, and today I'll talk about clipping, 

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I Love Reading: Long Form Essays and Journalism

In this week's installment of I Love Reading I want to talk about the kind of reading that is not books, not news, not blogs, but something in between. It demands a little bit more of your attention span than Twitter, but maybe not as much as your book group's latest pick. It can be from last week or fifteen years ago, and still be relevant to today. It can be a true tale of crime and punishment, an

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I Love Reading: News, Blogs, Twitter

In this week's episode of I Love Reading, I will talk about updates. I don't mean the kind of updates that clutter your Facebook feed, though they are basically the same thing. When I say updates I mean news in the journalistic, newspaper sense, news from your field or area of interest, or news that is created and shared among your group of friends and trusted online acquaintances.

A lot of these updates and news sources now take the form of blogs. Long ago, a blog was considered to be an online diary or 

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I Love Reading: EPUB and PDF

For the first part of this series, I want to talk about a few of the formats commonly used for reading digital text as well as the tools — software and devices — we can use to read them.

Library ebooks are available in EPUB, PDF, and Kindle format. The Library also subscribes to hundreds of databases, some of which will allow you to download articles or page images for personal use in PDF format.

Jump to files and 

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How Do I Love Reading? Let Me Count the Ways

This February in the eReading Room we'll be celebrating all the different ways we love to read. If you're the kind of person who will read a cereal box if it's the only thing nearby, you'll want to pay special attention to this four-part series. I'll be detailing some of the new ways we read now, outside of the traditional printed-and-bound-and-published volume (which, don't get me wrong, we still love just as much). This purpose of this series is to help you get the most out of online reading at work, at home, or 

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January 2012 NYPL Blog Highlights

Is it really the end of January? It doesn't feel like it... (60º F?!)

Either way, the NYPL Blogs have been off to a great start in 2012. In case you're just joining us...

We sang show tunes and danced on stage. We ... Read More ›

2011 NYPL Blog Highlights by the Numbers

Most used words in post titles in 2011; wordle.netIn 2011, NYPL bloggers published nearly 900 posts about subjects ranging from the ubiquitous Language & Literature and History, Biography & Genealogy to unusual topics such as Graffiti and even Automobile Maintenance & Repair. We started special channels on Africa and the African Diaspora,

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November 2011 NYPL Blog Highlights

The clocks have been turned back, the turkey and cranberry sauce leftovers have been eaten, and mild weather notwithstanding winter is certainly on its way. Earlier this month one of our bloggers asked, "Where Do You Get Your Information?" If you're reading this, 

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Notes From a Life-long Learner: Podcasting

A podcast is an audio program anyone can make, post to a website, and make available for download onto a computer or portable device, such as an iPod (hence the term “podcast”). Listeners can subscribe to a podcast and get future episodes downloaded automatically as they become available. You probably already subscribe to podcasts of various kinds, but have you ever considered making your own?

Come on! You could garner a great following and become the next (insert favorite radio personality here). Or you 

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Where Do You Get Your Information?

A recent conversation with a patron at the Battery Park City Library reminded me of one of my past blog posts in which I pondered the time-saving methods and ideas of Mevil Dewey. I'll have you know that since that post I have implemented none of Dewey's radical ideas. Interestingly enough though, a few of my colleagues do use his methods by spelling my last name "Parrot" instead of "Parrott." Though I personally have not yet benefited from 

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October 2011 NYPL Blog Highlights

It's time for scares it's time for screams IT'S HALLOWEEN.

This month on the NYPL blogs we have all just been gearing up for this one special night. Our costumes were as varied as our blog subject matter, can you guess what we dressed up as?

A person from 1988 with a boombox A skeleton with butterfly wings A ... Read More ›

Database? What? Huh?

It was a sunny day at Grand Concourse Library. A patron who visits the Library every morning for the newspaper was discussing a book he had just ordered.

The book, Henry Kissinger's On China, reminded him of the American/Chinese political climate in the 1980s. He was curious to know if the Library had access to 

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Wikipedia! The Musical! A Review!

Wikipedia! The Musical! design created by Lauren Lampasone

On October 22, “Wikipedia! The Musical!” was staged at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. Despite its whimsical name, it was not really a musical but an editathon — a chance to edit Wikipedia with a group of people in an inspiring location. Though its focus was improving articles on musical theater, anyone interested in the performing arts was welcome.

For me, 

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Musical of the Month: The Black Crook

Most musical theater history books cautiously locate the birth of the American Musical at Niblo's Garden (a theater once located on Prince Street) on September 12, 1866 at the opening of The Black Crook. Of course, among many scholars, this identification is regarded as something of a joke — song had been integrated into plays since the early days of Greek drama, and the songs in The Black Crook, at least in its original version, were mostly diversions from the plot — no more related to the action and characters than commercial breaks are to an episode of Glee. Nonetheless, 

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May 2011 NYPL Blog Highlights

Did you see? This month on the blogs...

The Stephen A. Schwarzman building celebrated turning 100! We remembered the days when the SASB was a ... Read More ›

Parallel Parking Will Not Be Your Only Challenge in Life: Learning Express Library

My friend arrived at my home wet and hungry. On the way to my house her windshield wipers stopped working which was problematic since it was raining. She couldn't make out which lane she was in but she could distinguish the wiggly globs of red and green as traffic lights. She wanted to stop and get a bagel on the way but there was nowhere to park in the parking lot of the bagel store. Well there were available spaces but her car no longer does that thing, the thing where you go backwards, you know, 'reverse,' so you have to really plan out your parking 

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April 2011 NYPL Blog Highlights

April can be sort of cruel (I'm paraphrasing...) but on the NYPL blogs it was a blast! I couldn't help but notice...

You got caught in the rain, were fooled by a prank, then slipped on a banana peel. You had a nightmare about a ... Read More ›

"No Day But Today": A look at Jonathan Larson's Word Files

In my last post I discussed the urgent problem of preserving "born digital" collections (that is, creative drafts produced using a computer rather than paper and pencil), and the very real possibility that a large portion of our cultural history will be lost unless we solve it quickly.  Today, though, the sun is shining, the weather is warm, and the days are getting longer, so I turn to the happier subject of the really remarkable things a scholar can learn using born digital data.

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Howard Ashman and Our Digital Future

Howard Ashman's disks at the Library of CongressThe Performing Arts Library has an amazing collection of manuscript and typewritten drafts from some of the greatest writers and musicians in the world.  The processes that led to groundbreaking experimental music compositions like John Cage's Music of Changes or Imaginary Landscape No. 1 are documented in the artist's papers. The Fred Ebb collection allows a researcher to peer into the creative process that led to lyrics like "Life is a Cabaret" and 

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