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Blog Posts by Subject: Internet

Our Improved Locations Finder—Now In Beta

With thousands of people every day trying to find or planning to visit one of over 90 NYPL branches, the Locations section is the most heavily visited part of the website after the homepage. We’ve been testing our new version internally for a couple of months now and we’re ready to open it up to the public for beta testing.Read More ›

Booktalking "Want to Go Private?" by Sarah Littman

Fourteen-year-old Abby is starting ninth grade, and nothing is more comforting to her than venting about her daily trials and tribulations to BlueSkyBoi, aka Luke Redmond, on chezteen.com. Read More ›

Presenting Some PowerPoint Alternatives

Looking for some new presentation tools to impress your co-workers, pad your resume, or even try something new in the classroom? Try these free web-based presentation tools and break away from the ever present PowerPoint. If you'd like more library resources for PowerPoint and other presentation software, scroll down to the bottom of this post.Read More ›

How-To: Sign Up for a Free E-mail Account

An e-mail account is good for more than keeping in touch with friends and family! It’s your passport to the internet. Many online services require an e-mail address to join.

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Booktalking "The Invisible Web" by Chris Sherman and Gary Price

We were lucky to have Gary Price present a workshop at the Library on keeping up with the latest technological developments. On some level, I knew that there were portions of the Internet that were only accessible if you know the URL. However, I was not well versed on the exact differences between the web and the Internet and exactly how search engines work before I read this book. In fact, a family member recently launched a web site for his wedding that is only accessible for users who have a user name and password. Even if other people accidentally happened upon the web site, they would 

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Tumbling into Tumblr with Kingsbridge Teens

During the course of several conversations I’ve had with the kids in my Teen Advisory Group over the last year, they told me that they use Tumblr more often than they use Twitter or Facebook. More importantly, they told me that Tumblr was one of their favorite ways to get book recommendations. And that’s what set the wheels in motion.Read More ›

2013 in Reference and Recommendations

Whether you come to The New York Public Library looking for something good to read or to find that missing bit of information you needed, we hope you were able to find what you were looking for in 2013. We're always here to help, and we hope to see you again next year!Read More ›

NYPL Labs Building Inspector: No Sleep Til Brooklyn, API, and Open Source Edition

A few weeks ago, we launched Building Inspector, NYPL Labs' latest tool for opening up historical maps of New York City. In that time, you (and lots of other Inspectors) have helped unlock an era of Manhattan's past, generating a building-level snapshot of the city 150 years ago that modern mapping tools can make use of.

Hooray! You did it! We did it (we're really hooked too). To celebrate the completion of the 1857 Manhattan Atlas, we've got some exciting news:

    We're 
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Booktalking "Anyone You Want Me to Be: A True Story of Sex and Death on the Internet" by John E. Douglas

Luckily for criminals and unluckily for the rest of us, the advent of the Internet provided a new trolling ground for serial killers to scroll for victims. Millions of people are available at the click of a mouse on Internet dating sites. Easier, perhaps, then cruising the streets on the hunt. Easier to present a likeable, easy-going, good-guy image 

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Great Book Web Sites

I was inspired to write this blog from my terrific experience with booktv.org. I very much enjoy watching and listening to authors describe their research and conclusions that they have metamorphosed into works of literature.

BookTV is featured on CSPAN2 (Channel 66 in my neighborhood) on weekends, if you have cable TV. It features authors of nonfiction works being interviewed about their books. Following the interview, the floor is opened up to audience questions. One weekend, I was delighted to discover that they have a web site. It got me to thinking about what 

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From New York to Shanghai: A New Journey to the East

Blogging for NYPL has been such a rewarding experience: sharing resources, programs and services to the digital community and beyond. In the past three years or so, I've blogged about some unconventional topics like Linsanity to the more serious ones like The Jews of Shanghai.

Researching on these topics introduced me to a variety of digital and print resources that I would 

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Binding Your Own E-books: Part 1 (The Internet Archive BookReader)

The Wizard of Oz in the BookReaderIn 2005, the Internet Archive released the first version of their BookReader, a web widget that allows a user to flip through images of book pages with an animation that suggests the turning of physical paper. The current version also allows you to view the images as set of thumbnails or as a vertically scrolling set of page images (like a PDF). The code is open source and written in JavaScript (a computer language that runs entirely in the web browser), so it's very easy to install the widget on 

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We Are Asking For Your Help With Technology Challenges at NYPL

Over a century ago, The New York Public Library was founded with a basic purpose: to provide free access to information, literature, and cultural resources for the enjoyment and enrichment of all New Yorkers.

In the late 19th century, this meant accumulating vast collections spanning all subjects and languages, erecting beautiful buildings to store these books, and hiring brilliant, dedicated librarians to serve them to the public. But what would it look like if we founded The New York Public Library today?

Look around you and you’ll notice that 

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Our New Home Page, Search-dominance, and NYPL's Goals

I'm truly pleased to announce the launch of NYPL's new home page! It has more and better feature items for us to share great NYPL activities and materials with you, and a new book recommender tool that we're really excited about.

This new design—which we will continue to improve—builds off of a history of Web research, as well as a lot of recent work at NYPL suggesting we should do a better job of exposing our patrons to the full breadth of great NYPL services, programs, and other offerings. If you're here just to share 

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Hack the Library with Hackasaurus!

Are we teaching New York's teens tools for a life of crime?! Not exactly. Hackasaurus is a website that makes it easy for people to manipulate our favorite webpages while we learn about the ins and outs of HTML. A group of six teens met on a Tuesday afternoon to try out this new program and add their personal touch to the internet.

Using Hackasaurus 

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Transmissions from the Timothy Leary Papers: Experiments in Teletype to Tele-Thought

The Experiential TypewriterAs both a psychologist and innovator, Timothy Leary was interested in the role technology played in transmitting human thoughts and feelings. Although his earlier research focused on the assessment of personality, it's not unexpected that the problem of communication would concern him after his experiences with mind-expanding drugs. For those with an interest in technological gadgets and how they affect our interaction with others, the Leary papers document some unusual and creative ideas in human communication.

His early experiments with 

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Announcing the NYPL Digital Collections API

The New York Public Library is pleased to announce the release of its Digital Collections API (application programming interface). This tool allows software developers both in and outside of the library to write programs that search our digital collections, process the descriptions of each object, and find links to the relevant pages on the NYPL Digital Gallery. We are very excited to see what the brilliant developers who use our digital library will create. In the following post, Digital Curator for the Performing Arts, Doug Reside, reflects on 

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NYPL's Gift to Online Learners... lynda.com for Free!

In this season of gift giving, the New York Public Library has just added a wonderful new resource — lynda.com — for New Yorkers who need the top of the line in online software training. NYPL's business library, SIBL, has entered into a year long pilot to provide free access to the continuously expanding library of 1,500 online training videos.

As soon as your holiday reveling has wound down, head to SIBL and plunk yourself down at one of the nine dedicated lynda.com workstations or at any of the other 

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Red Flags for Email Scams

Job search on the Internet is convenient; however, job seekers have to be extra careful with job offerings which arrive in email unsolicited.

The New York State Department of Labor has prepared the following information to alert job seekers to be cautious with their Email job search.

Red Flags for Email Scams

Many credible businesses now use online sites such as Facebook and Craigslist to recruit new employees. Conducting your job search on the Internet is convenient and popular in today's job 

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July 2012 NYPL Blog Highlights

July blogs were as bright as fireworks and as cool as ice pops on a hot summer day.

Oh say did you see...

how to rescue your files from ancient floppy disks. how to find word meanings. how to crochet without tears. how to get ... Read More ›
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