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Blog Posts by Subject: Teen and Young Adult Literature

I Stayed Up Late Reading Cruel Beauty and Why You Should Too

If you want a YA book with demon lovers, fairy tale-Greek mythology mashups, wicked heroines, a castle full of shadowy secrets, and a passionate romance that begins with a murder attempt, look no further.Read More ›

Booktalking "The Impossible Knife of Memory" by Laurie Halse Anderson

“I was first in line when the bus pulled in. Took the seat on the left two rows from the back. Stared at the zombies on the sidewalk dramatically reciting their lines, stalking to the edges of their stages, playing at life.”Read More ›

Booktalking "Lark" by Tracey Porter

Sixteen-year-old Lark Austin is left to die in the woods. Eve, a former best friend and Nyetta, a girl who was babysat by Lark, struggle with the death. Lark, Eve and Nyetta alternately voice their perspectives of the event and its aftermath.Read More ›

Tumbling into Tumblr with Kingsbridge Teens

During the course of several conversations I’ve had with the kids in my Teen Advisory Group over the last year, they told me that they use Tumblr more often than they use Twitter or Facebook. More importantly, they told me that Tumblr was one of their favorite ways to get book recommendations. And that’s what set the wheels in motion.Read More ›

Rainha's Story: Lyn Miller-Lachmann on the Importance of Reading and Libraries

I had the distinct pleasure of meeting Lyn Miller-Lachmann during a reference interview in the Young Adult and Children’s room at the Columbus Library. Lyn’s little lego story about Rainha and reading has warmed my heart and made me want to share it.Read More ›

Reality Rules! 2014 Nonfiction Award Winners - Youth Media Awards

The Youth Media Awards were just announced during the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Conference in Philadelphia. Two of the award specifically honor nonfiction - the Sibert Medal and the YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction.Read More ›

Booktalking "The Stone Girl" by Alyssa Sheinmel

"Sethie" (Sarah Beth) decides that being thin is more important than attending yearbook meetings at school. Her best friend Janey helps her buy skinny jeans with a waist size one inch larger than Janey's. Sethie sleeps with Shaw, a boy who always makes her feel cold, rather than college kid Ben, whose hand feels warm on her skin.

Sethie drinks copious amounts of water to prevent weight gain. She begins vomiting up her 

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The Kingsbridge TAG Explores Another Side of The Walking Dead

Perhaps you thought that everything that can be said about the zombies-vs.-survivors story The Walking Dead has been said already. You've already read the graphic novels, watched the TV show, and talked about each episode after you watched it. Ah … but have you played the board game?

Earlier this year I received a copy of The Walking Dead board game that is based on the TV show (there's another board game based on the graphic novels), and I figured that my Teen Advisory Group would be up to the challenge of playing it. I also figured that Friday the 

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Macomb's Bridge Teens Review Graphic Novels

The Ultimate's 2: Grand Theft America

Reviewed by Elan

The comic The Ultimate's 2 by Mark Miller is a great comic that describes how the Ulitimates began. This book takes place in the Marvel Universe, where the heroes have different origins from the Marvel Universe. It is slightly darker and follows Iron man, Captain America and Thor as they try to stop a whole new World War form emerging. They recruit familiar heroes and eventually 

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Kingsbridge Teens Recommend: Classic, New, and SUPER-New Books!

The teens in our Teen Advisory Group have been doing a lot of reading this fall. See if you agree with their reviews!

Marie Antoinette, Serial Killer by Katie Alender For as long as she can remember, Colette Iselin has been waiting to go to Paris in order to learn more about her heritage. However, upon her arrival she soon learns that there has been a series of peculiar murders. Each victim is an heir of an upper-class family, and their heads are always chopped 

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Looking for a Good Book? Try an Award-Winning Read

Each year multiple literary prizes are awarded to recognize the works of great writers. Some of these awards are well known and much anticipated like the prestigious Nobel Prize for Literature, while others are lesser known. Here is a list of some of the more popular literary awards given out this year.

The Nobel Prize for Literature was established in 1901 at the bequest of Alfred Nobel (Swedish chemist, engineer, innovator and inventor of dynamite). It is awarded by the Swedish Academy in 

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Tall, Dark and Deadly: Vampire Fiction For Teens

The concept of vampires has grown and expanded over the last few centuries. Sometimes they suffer from a disease, or sometimes they just evolve this way. Sometimes they prey upon humans, or sometimes they live among humans in peace. Sometimes they even sparkle in the sunlight.

Here are fifteen novels that you can find in our young adult collections that embrace many different aspects of vampires: the dangerous, the romantic, the bloodthirsty, and the beautiful.

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Author Interview with Hollis Seamon

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Author Hollis Seamon recently wrote an amazing young adult novel, Somebody Up There Hates You, featuring two teenagers living in hospice care while suffering from terminal cancer. Despite the grim subject matter, I can honestly say that this was one of the more heartful and thoughtful books I've read this year. Hollis was kind enough to answer a few 

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Fight for Your Right to Read: Banned Books Week 2013

From 2000 to 2009, 8 out of the top 10 books on "The Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books" were specifically written for teens or children. In fact out of that list of 100, 67 were books for teens or children. Titles such as the Harry Potter series (#1), the

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Identity Crisis: A Booklist For Teens

As your summer vacation ends and the new school year begins, it's time to consider: Who are you? Who are you now, who do you want to be, and will you/can you/SHOULD you try to reinvent yourself?

Here's a list of twenty fiction books for teens that deal with the topic of identity, from realistic fiction to fantastic fiction and beyond.

Being Henry David by Cal Armistead A boy wakes up in Penn Station. He has no memory of how he got there, how he got his head injury, or 

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Teen Road Trip Novels: Romance, Reunions and Roadside Attractions

… for the first time in his life Peter understood what the opposite of lost was: that it had nothing to do with maps or directions or stayin on course; that it was, in fact, nothing more than being found.

You Are Here by Jennifer E. Smith

The road trip is an American rite of passage. Nothing is more American than getting in a car, turning it onto a highway and just driving off, destination unknown (or not required).  Windows down, music up and 

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Teen Pride Bookmarks

Getting teens interested in reading is difficult, but it's taught me a few things: when I was a teen, I would at times cut school to just to read. Why?! (If any teens are reading this, please don't cut school.)

And: no matter how much I make flyers, display or talk about a great book that I recently read, I have to accept that some teens just do not pick up a book. Which leads me to lesson 2. I had to keep track and befriend the teens that did come in and check out books.

Last June, I reserved some LGBTQ books, made a flier proclaiming "Celebrate Pride" and 

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Teen Summer Reading Spotlight on Reality (a.k.a., Nonfiction Books)

If you enjoy weird mysteries and separating truth from fiction, then you'll definitely enjoy Dead Strange: The Bizarre Truths Behind 50 World-Famous Mysteries by Matt Lamy.

This book covers different topics from alchemy to zombies, and the author discusses the difference between the myth and the reality of each topic. Along the way you'll learn about mysteries like Area 51, Easter Island, ESP, the Loch Ness Monster, Men in Black, and poltergeists. And hey, if you learn how to prepare 

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What to Read Next: YA Book Recommendations in your Favorite Genres

Finding a good book can be a Herculean task. It seems impossible and even when you think you've found something will it match your expectations or will the ending have you wanting to throw the book across the room? (Something I have done before!) Here I try to take the guess work out of finding a good book in some of your favorite genres.

Dystopia/Science Fiction

Are you fan of books with apocalyptic landscapes? Technology run amok? Villains with evil henchman? A good dystopian fantasy can immerse you in a world gone bad and have you living a character's paranoia 

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Teen Summer Reading Spotlight: Friends With Boys by Faith Erin Hicks

Making the transition from homeschool to high school is tough, and Maggie is going through a lot of culture shock. Being able to see ghosts isn't making things any easier.

In Friends With Boys by Faith Erin Hicks, Maggie is surrounded by more people than ever before, and yet she still feels all alone. Her older brothers are busy with their own friends, her mother is gone, and her father is busy with his new job. But little by little, Maggie starts finding her way around her 

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