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Blog Posts by Subject: Children's Literature

Booktalking "Will You, Won't You?" by Jessie Haas

Mad is not exactly thrilled to be spending the summer learning how to dance Ceilidhs (pronounced kay-lees) in the Scottish style. However, to her surprise, she finds that dancing is just like riding, in terms of the movement. She loves the geometry of the group dance, and she feels as though she is flying.

The girl imagined that trail-riding with Cloud would be dreamy 

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Booktalking "Off Like the Wind" by Michael Spradlin

Three businessmen, William Russell, Alexander Majors and William Waddell came up with the idea of using horses and riders to transport mail from Missouri to California to expedite communication between the eastern and western states. This was particularly important since the Civil War was approaching. Also, people were able to get news from their families in several days instead of months or years.

In 1860, the Pony Express was born, and it ran until 1861. In the spring of 1861, Lincoln's inaugural address traveled from Missouri to California in record time: 7 days 

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Booktalking "Lizards" by Nic Bishop

Stunning. That one word does justice to Nic Bishop's photographic talents.

Lizards existed 150 million years ago, along with dinosaurs. Some lizards lack legs; therefore they can be confused with snakes, but snakes do not have ear holes. The biggest lizard, the Komodo dragon, which is also the largest venomous animal in the world, can grow to be up to ten feet long. One of its favorite snacks is water buffalo.

Unfortunately, baby lizards do not get much of a childhood; they are on their own shortly after birth. Some lizards inhabit deserts, while 

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Booktalking "Book Fiesta!" by Pat Mora

The kids in this book read in many languages, including English, Spanish, Chinese, etc. They read by themselves or together at the library. In fact, a lion that looks suspiciously like one of our guardian lions of our flagship library, the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building ("the library with the lions") adorns the page 

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Booktalking "Alligator Wedding" by Nancy Jewell

I love the rhyming poetry in this book:

Where the alligators slither and slide on a warm summer night when the moon was bright an alligator took a bride.

The book is full of alligator things. The pair of alligators was married in the marshy glades, and the bride had a cobweb veil and a scaly green paw. The couple invited crocodiles, 

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Booktalking "Crocodile Safari" by Jim Arnosky

Crocodiles existed in the time of dinosaurs. In some countries in Central America, crocs are an endangered species. This is the story of one couple's search for knowledge about the ancient creatures in the Everglades of Florida. They were able to see, photograph and videotape 20 crocs, including a one-foot long baby crocodile (adults are between eight and eleven feet long). It is difficult to see crocs even when they are present, since crocs like to camouflage into their environments.

Crocs are not the only animals that inhabit the Everglades. Rattlesnakes, manatees, 

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Tween Cartoonists Take off with Graphic Novels at Imagination Academy, Week 2

After a hiatus surrounding Independence Day, the Imagination Academy, a free writing workshop for tweens, resumed this past week at the 67th Street Library. This time, these 9 to 12 year olds were not just writing, but drawing, too, as this week's focus was on graphic novels. Following a presentation by a published graphic novelist, the kids explored this emerging book format in which both pictures and words work together to tell a story.

Dave Roman with studentsOn Tuesday,

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In Praise of Odd Children's Books

When I was in fifth grade, my mom read me a chapter a night of a strange and wonderful children's book by Richard Kennedy called Amy's Eyes. It had been a few years since the last time we shared nighttime reading, and I wondered if maybe I was too old for that kind of thing. I was quickly won over by this book which was more complex and seemingly adult.

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Booktalking "Frog Song" by Brenda Guiberson

Moisture helps frogs sing, not just the expected ribbit, but also different guttural sounds, such as thrum-rum. Think frogs are boring linguistically? Think again. Frogs and toads say buzz, chirp, bonk, click-clack, tink, plunk, brack, mwaa, and they whistle.

The strawberry poison dart frog in Costa Rica's rain forest sings a tiny song. Oklahoma's Great Plains narrow-mouthed toad makes a sound like a fly! The Surinam toad from 

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Booktalking "Flamingo Sunset" by Jonathan London

A baby chick is incubated by a flamingo couple for a month. When it hatches, its mother feeds it milk, mouth-to-mouth. Later, the bird baby rushes to its mother when a storm suddenly darkens the sky and rain pours down.

However, the next morning, a calm, bright world emerges. The flamingo grows and develops. Eventually, the teenage flamingo is 

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Celebrating America: A Book List for Kids

In college, I studied American History and Politics, but my interest in these subjects was sparked long before that, when as a child, I was exposed to several books, movies and TV shows that celebrated American history.

Three items in particular had a tremendous impact on me, and made me want to learn more about my country. Schoolhouse Rock was a series of educational shorts that ran in between the cartoons on Saturday mornings. Almost anyone of my generation will tell you that 

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Tween Writers Learn From Published Authors at the 67th Street Library's Second Imagination Academy

Kids embrace celebrated author Rita Williams-GarciaWe just kicked off the 2nd year of the 67th Street Library's creative writing summer program for tweens: the Imagination Academy. This past week the focus was on historical fiction and a fantastic group of local authors came to share their insights with the kids. After a presentation by the author, which anyone is welcome to attend, the kids got to spend the rest of the afternoon crafting their own stories under the tutelage of these experienced and celebrated writers.

On Tuesday, 

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Pic Pick (LGBTQ Edition): King & King by Linda de Haan and Stern Nijland

King & King By Linda de Haan and Stern Nijland Recommended for Ages 6 and Up

How many times has your parent told you "That's it, I've had ENOUGH!"? Nevermind, I am sure everyone reading this blog is well behaved. Ok, well it has happened to me, I remember plenty of instances when my mom had had "enough." In this book, the Queen mother has had ENOUGH too!

King & King tells the fairy tale of a Queen who is ready to retire from ruling the kingdom. But to 

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Children's Libraries in New York City

By far the largest number of children's books—especially those for circulation (lending) to children and their families—is to be found at The New York Public Library. The largest collections of children's books in that you can visit are at its Children's Center at 42nd Street as well as the many children's rooms in the 87 neighborhood branches in Manhattan, the Bronx and Staten Island. There are also children's 

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Waiting on Wednesday: Amelia Bedelia, Piggie, and Greeks

Waiting on Wednesday is where we take a look at some of the most anticipated children's books that are now available to borrow on NYPL's catalog. What are you waiting for?

Picture Book

Ameila Bedelia's First Library Card by Herman Parish

Silly Amelia is at it again but this time at the library! What happens when you mix a juice box and a book drop? Or a good book and a rainstorm? Join Amelia as she learns about the library and the key to a librarian's heart.

Young Readers

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Booktalking "Giant Dance Party" by Betsy Bird

Lexy longs to perform in dances, but stage fright nixes that dream. Instead, she decides to become a dance teacher so that she can dance and avoid the stage. After all, dance teachers do not have to perform. Unfortunately, recruiting students seems impossible, even for free dance lessons. Frustrated, she quits being a dance teacher, but, unbeknownst to her, the 

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Booktalking "True Green Kids" by Kim McKay

Ever wonder what you could do to help the environment? This book provides a plethora of suggestions. Following are just a few of the ideas you can read about in this work.

    Watch your water consumption. Use natural light, such as sunshine. Recycle materials such as paper and aluminum cans. Reduce your consumption; use less.  
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Booktalking "Wild Horse Scientists" by Kay Frydenborg

Horse reproduction! I never thought that I would learn so much about this subject by reading a book about wild horse scientists, but I guess that it makes sense. After all, managing the numbers of wild horses on islands, especially publicly protected land in which predators are few and far between, is a challenge.

And what to do with the excess 

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The Influence of Struwwelpeter

Heinrich Hoffmann's Struwwelpeter from Andy's Early Comics ArchiveStruwwelpeter is a children's book that has been endlessly imitated and retold, while providing the inspiration for countless parodies.

Struwwelpeter, pronounced Strool'vel-pay-ter, is a collection of cruel and frightening stories written and illustrated by Dr. Heinrich Hoffmann in 1844. Wanting to buy his three-year son a book for Christmas and dissatisfied with what was available, he wrote his own. His 

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Fiction Atlas: Brooklyn in Children's Fiction and Picture Books (Part I)

Where in the world are you reading about? Fiction finds its settings in all corners of the world (and some places only imagined in our minds) but there's something special about fiction set in a familiar city or neighborhood. Let's take a trip out of Manhattan for now, and into the lively borough of Brooklyn! This is one of the most storied areas that make up New York City.

Settlers from the Dutch West India Company first founded the Village of Bruckelen in 1646, though the Lenape Native Americans had lived on the land that makes up the county for hundreds of years 

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