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Blog Posts by Subject: Children's Literature

Booktalking "Spring Pearl: the Last Flower" by Laurence Yep

Twelve-year-old Chou Spring Pearl moves to the ritzy Sung mansion when her scholar parents die in Canton in 1857.Read More ›

The Great Multicultural Children's Books of 2013 You Might Have Missed

The Center for the Study of Multicultural Children's Literature (CSMCL) recently chose the Best Multicultural Children's Books of 2013. So be sure to add some of these titles to your children's reading lists pronto!Read More ›

Booktalking "Vampirina Ballerina" by Anne Marie Pace

Vampirina Ballerina loves dancing, and she does so adorned with a black leotard and black ballet shoes. She also has a black cat and a bat as pets, which are not welcome at ballet class. Plié, relevé... all of the steps that she must learn are daunting, and Vampirina attempts to not trip over her own feet in the process. However, practicing with mummies, vampires and monsters in the Haunted Mansion will definitely improve her skills.Read More ›

Booktalking "The Thing About Luck" by Cynthia Kadohata

Twelve-year-old Summer learns much about the farming process and the wheat crop from working on combine farms with her family. Thunder is a 95-pound Doberman pincher who is her constant companion. He follows her everywhere, and he is always pleasant and willing to pour love into her heart.Read More ›

Children's Literary Salon in Retrospect: Common Core on January 4, 2014

Marcie Colleen, Picture Book Education Consultant, Amie Wright, Selection Supervisor, MyLibraryNYC, and Daryl Grabarek, editor of School Library Journal's (SLJ) enewsletter, Curriculum Connections joined host Betsy Bird to discuss how teachers, students and parents are grappling with the new standards. I was interested to discover that New York City's new schools chancellor, Carmen Farina, endorses Common Core standards.

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Booktalking "Mahjong All Day Long" by Ginnie Lo

Everyone loves mahjong, a Chinese tile matching game. When you play mahjong, you can hear the clicking of the tiles.

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Battery Park City Tween Book Club: 2013 in Review

Last summer, the tweens of Battery Park City formed a book club. Genres were selected by vote each month, and the books were selected based upon their requests and preferences. Everyone was encouraged to finish the book even if it was not to their taste, which added another dimension to the discussion at our meetings. Each meeting closed with a book talk of the upcoming title and an opportunity for book sharing, which allowed everyone to speak about other books that the group might enjoy.

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Booktalking "Good Morning China" by Hu Yong Yi

In the morning in China, everyone chooses different activities. People in the park have their morning fun. One person is resting by the lotus pond. Another one cycles, some people play badminton, and some are stretching. Other people are dancing, some with swords or fans, and others in a waltz. Some people play chess and others play card games.

Harmony, peace, and simplicity are at the center of this work. What do you do in the morning?

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From the Shelves at NYPL: Ruth Guerrier-Pierre

Ruth Guerrier-Pierre keeps the children visiting the Kips Bay Branch of the New York Public Library on their toes. She is an avid reader and loves nothing better than to share books hot-off-the-presses with her readers. Ruth, a life-long New Yorker, started working at NYPL while still an ungraduate at Queens College. She knows all about handling books—she had to shelve plenty while working as a Page in the Central Children's Room at the Donnell Library in 2006.

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Fiction Atlas: Brooklyn in Children's Fiction and Picture Books (Part II)

Where in the world are you reading about? Fiction finds its settings in all corners of the world (and some places only imagined in our minds) but there's something special about fiction set in a familiar city or neighborhood. Let's take a trip out of Manhattan for now, and into the lively borough of Brooklyn! This is one of the most storied areas that make up New York City.

Settlers from the Dutch West India Company first founded the Village of Bruckelen in 1646, though the Lenape Native Americans had lived on the land that makes up the county for hundreds of years 

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From the Shelves at NYPL: Stephanie Whelan

Stephanie Whelan visiting the The ABC of It: Why Children's Books Matter, located at NYPL's main library on 42nd Street & curated by Leonard Marcus.Stephanie Whelan has been the Children's Librarian at the Seward Park Library since 2008. The branch is set in the east corner of Seward Park, the first permanent, municipally built playground in the United States. This Lower East Side neighborhood is home to a bustling, ethnically diverse community whose children make the library one of their must-go-to places to 

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From the Shelves at NYPL: Anna Taylor

Anna Taylor visiting the interactive exhibition The ABC of It: Why Children's Books Matter, curated by Leonard MarcusAnna Taylor works at the New York Public Library’s Columbus Library—more than a short walk from Columbus Circle—over on 10th Avenue between 50th and 51st Streets in the Clinton (aka Hell’s Kitchen or Midtown West) neighborhood... an area that has been transformed in recent years by the dramatic increase in residential construction. It is not unusual to find this library filled to the rafters with children and teens 

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Booktalking "Tyrannoclaus" by Janet Lawler

Ready for Christmas with dinosaurs? Then this is the book for you. Tyrannoclaus (a Tyrannosaurus rex) has presents for stegosaur girls. He has tasty treats for 

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Booktalking "Dewey's Christmas at the Library" by Vicki Myron and Bret Witter

It is Christmas at the library for the kitty! Dewey has come a long way since last winter when he was rescued by Spencer Library director Vicki from the book-return drop. This year he is ready and enthusiastic for Christmas at the library. He loves everything about the season: gift bags, red yarn galore, and a Christmas tree that 

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Great Graphic Novels for Kids 2013

Late last year, I featured some of my favorite graphic novels aimed at children 12 and under from the New York Public Library's collection. The list proved so popular I even made a sequel. Many people have asked me for a list of updated titles, so I have featured five of my new favorite comic titles that were published this year. A few of these selections are even featured in the

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Booktalking "The Twelve Bots of Christmas" by Nathan Hale

Santa glides across the sky in a spaceship-like vehicle pulled by four metallic reindeer above a city that is reminiscent of Futurama cartoons. 

On the first day of Christmas, the robot gets a cartridge in a gear tree. Every day, for a week and a half, the happy robot receives mechanical approximations of the gifts bestowed in the original

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It's Here! NYPL's Children's Books 2013

The latest edition of the New York Public Library's annual list of titles published for children can be found at Children's Books 2013 (PDF) and online at labs.nypl.org/childrens-books-2013.

Nineteen Children's Librarians pored over a wealth of new releases throughout the year, often with the help of the children in 

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Booktalking "The Gingerbread Pirates" by Kristin Kladstrup

Jim and his mother were making gingerbread men on Christmas eve one year, and Jim suggested transforming the cookies into gingerbread pirates. His mom concurred. However, Jim did not want Santa to eat Captain Cookie (complete with a toothpick peg leg), so he took him to his bedroom that 

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Children's Literary Salon in Retrospect: Picture Books on November 2, 2013

I have been curious about how picture books are constructed and illustrated, and the latest Children's Literary Salon addressed exactly that topic. Betsy Bird, Young Adult Materials Specialist at NYPL organizes and hosts the monthly program for enthusiasts of children's literature. She let the audience know that author/illustrators Peter Brown, Steve Light and Sergio Ruzzier would give brief presentations 

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Classroom Connections: 'New York, Then & Now' Immigration to Washington Heights/Inwood (Gr. 6-8)

The story of immigration to America is a rich tapestry whose opposing threads, oddly for how much they reject each other's reality, hang together as one. It outrages us and gives us hope in frighteningly equal measure.

Nowhere is this truer than New York City, a city of extremes in every sense. The community known as Washington Heights/Inwood originally spanned from 135th Street north to the top end of Manhattan Island, surrounded by the Hudson River on the west and the East River with Spuyten Duyvil's deadly currents in between. Its land is the highest ground in 

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