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Posts from Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Black Life Matters Feature of the Week: Epistolary Lives

Curator Steven G. Fullwood discusses the importance of handwritten letters, an intimate component of our newest exhibition, Curators' Choice: Black Life Matters. Read More ›

Preserving the Visual Past: Panasonic MII

Back in 1986 Panasonic thought they had the competitive answer to Sony's Betacam SP format. Their product was smaller, lighter and poised to take over the electronic news gathering (ENG) market. The plan must have looked great on paper, but the MII format was a disaster.Read More ›

The Schomburg Center is a Finalist for the National Medal for Museum and Library Service!

The National Medal for Museum and Library Service is the nation’s highest honor given to museums and libraries by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in recognition of exceptional service to the community and for making a difference in the lives of individuals, families, and communities. We are excited to announce that the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture has been named as a finalist for the 2015 National Medal award!Read More ›

Podcast #49: Charles Blow on His Unexpected Childhood Hero

Charles Blow speaks with Schomburg Center director Khalil Muhammad about his middle name, how he was nearly baptized twice, and his unexpected childhood hero.Read More ›

Learn More About Artist Carole Byard's "Rent Series"

Alexis De Veaux talks to us about Carole Byard's "Rent Series," a collection of artwork inspired by old rent receipts her late father kept in his lifelong efforts to provide housing for their family.Read More ›

Podcast #47: Ntozake Shange on Inspiration and Harlem

As we begin Black History Month, The New York Public Library Podcast welcomes the great American playwright and poet Ntozake Shange, creator of the Obie-Award-winning play “for colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf.”Read More ›

Black Life Matters Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: How You Can Help

The Schomburg Wikipedia Edit-a-thon will give patrons the tools to edit the popular online encyclopedia, with the goal of making black life more visible within its pages. If you can't attend in person there are still ways that you can participate wherever you are.Read More ›

Calling All Artists: Design Schomburg's Future!

On February 9, 2015, the Schomburg Center will launch its search for the perfect t-shirt design that captures the essence of the institution. The winning design will be printed on t-shirts and other merchandise and sold in the Schomburg Shop! Read More ›

Listen Up! Podcasts from the Schomburg Center

Subscribe now to hear our visiting scholars share their knowledge and passions.Read More ›

Artifacts From the Arthur Ashe Archive

The artifacts component consists of a Presidential Medal of Freedom, Head Competition Racquet, lapel pins, buttons, jewelry, medals, badges, trophy, awards, flags, and other miscellaneous items that illustrate the life and career of Arthur Ashe from the 1960s through the early 1990s.Read More ›

A Decade for People of African Descent

On December 9, ambassadors, UN dignitaries, students, and others, gathered in the Langston Hughes atrium for a pre-event to Human Rights Day and to the official takeoff of the International Decade for People of African Descent, both happening the following day. Read More ›

Schomburg Treasures: WPA Artwork

The Schomburg Center's collection of WPA artwork is now available on the NYPL's Digital Collections site.Read More ›

Song and Dance: The Power Of Black Music

American music is largely influenced by African American music, so concluded eminent musicologists just before the 20th century.Read More ›

Africans in India: Then and Now

The Schomburg Center's exhibition Africans in India: A Rediscovery recently opened in New Delhi, India's capital, against a backdrop of racist attacks against Africans. The contrast between the African experience of yesterday and that of today could not have been greater and the exhibition could not have come at a more appropriate time.Read More ›

Symphony of the New World: 50th Anniversary of a Pioneering Organization

In May 1964, two months before The Civil Rights Act (outlawing discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin) became law, noted conductor Benjamin Steinberg formed a committee of 13 musicians, 12 of whom were African American, with the intention of forming a new integrated orchestra called the Symphony of the New World (SNW).Read More ›

Get On Up: Review Of The James Brown Movie

“All musical instruments are drums,” says Chad Boseman, convincingly portraying James Brown. Words were drums, too, to “The Godfather Of Soul.”Read More ›

A Trip Down Memory Lane: The Lasting Influence of Illmatic

Tomorrow marks the 20th anniversary of Nas’s debut album, Illmatic. On Wednesday, I had the privilege to attend the opening of the Tribeca Film Festival to watch my friend and former colleague Erik Parker’s documentary, Time Is Illmatic. Parker’s film examines Nas’s groundbreaking album because it symbolizes the shift of hip-hop’s nerve center and lyrics in 1994. Read More ›

Lorraine Hansberry: Dreamer Supreme

The Lorraine Hansberry Collection at the Schomburg Center For Research In Black Culture is a remarkably thorough record of family, personal, and professional papers, letters, manuscripts and photographs documenting her entire life as an artist and activist.Read More ›

12 Years a Slave. What About 15 Years in a Cave?

We’ll know in one month if Steve McQueen’s film gets an Oscar. But one thing is sure: the heretofore largely unfamiliar Solomon Northup has become a household name.Read More ›

August Wilson's How I Learned What I Learned

Frederick August Kittle Jr. loved libraries. That's a point clearly made in How I Learned What I Learned, August Wilson's autobiographical play at the Signature Center, directed by Todd Kreidler, starring Ruben Santiago Hudson. Freddie Kittle Jr. preferred libraries to Pittsburgh schools which were not an easy way for him to learn. He also loved his mother, Daisy Wilson, and he loved people, particularly black people.

How I Learned What I Learned is a memoir 

... Read More ›
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