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Posts from New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center

Juana Vargas "La Macarrona:" A Flamenco Treasure

The footage of Juana Vargas "La Macarrona" (1870-1947), filmed in 1917 by Léonide Massine and held in the Jerome Robbins Dance Division at the Library for the Performing Arts, is one of the Library's most important, and little-known, flamenco treasures. As a member of the Wertheim study, I was honored to be invited to write a blog post about the Library's significant holdings related to flamenco. Read More ›

Jerome Robbins Dance Division Annual Report FY14 Available

The Dance Division has continued its work, assuring its place in the world, as a global, international archive, the world's largest of its kind dedicated to dance, by collecting, preserving and making accessible materials about the many varieties of dance in the world. Read More ›

Sesame Street and the People In Your Neighborhood

Beyond the animation cels, drawings, media and the amazing experience of seeing the Muppets up close, the exhibition, "Somebody Come and Play,” lets us see and hear the way that research and entertainment/production values inform each other to create memorable moments. And, since the 1970-1971 season, those moments have include Jeffrey Moss’ song “Who are the People in Your Neighborhood?”Read More ›

Rated B (for Behavior and Blogging)

Sesame Street's Crumby Pictures series teaches “executive function,” which means both self-control and learning ways to cue behavior and decision making. They focus on Cookie Monster, whose control issues focus on cookies. Read More ›

Monsterpiece Theatre

It may have been inevitable, but Cookie Monster was selected to host, in a direct parody of Masterpiece Theatre's original host, Alistair Cooke.Read More ›

Time Machine: Victor Jessen, Time’s Surreptitious Splicer

Dressed in black with his homemade blackened blimp, his pockets are stuffed with exposed and unexposed film; he is in constant fear of discovery.Read More ›

Musical of the Month: Tenderloin

The show opened at the 46th Street (now the Richard Rodgers) Theater in October 1960 to mixed reviews and closed the following spring after only 271 performances. It has received respectful attention in performances off-Broadway and in City Center’s Encores! series, but has never been revived on Broadway. What exactly went wrong?Read More ›

MY Business is to Sing: Emily Dickinson, Musician and Poet

The daily musical activities of poet Emily Dickinson reveal a great deal about the cultural offerings available to a woman of her time, place, and class. For Dickinson, these experiences provided a vital and necessary backdrop for her identity and and more importantly, for her emerging poetic voice.Read More ›

The Wonderful Wide World of Sesame Street

Did you know that Sesame Street has international reach? Sesame Workshop, the company that produces Sesame Street, also co-produces international versions of the beloved television show in many different languages for audiences in many different countries.Read More ›

Mike Nichols, 1931-2014

Mike Nichols, the revered film and theater director who is one of only a dozen EGOTs (winners of Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Awards), died of a heart attack yesterday at age 83.Read More ›

Time Machine: Time Travel for the Fisher Price Set

The end of 20th century, when Fisher Price sold $100 time machines for children, was a wild time with a penchant for deregulation. How else could a civilization produce something as potentially disruptive as the 1987 Fisher Price PXL2000? Read More ›

Happy 101st, Vivien!

Vivien Leigh, who was born November 5, 1913, may not have lived to see her 54th birthday, but she is one of the rare performers whose fame has long outlasted her death. Leigh's distinctive blend of delicacy and power as an actress, coupled with her great beauty, have helped to enshrine her.Read More ›

Happy Halloween to The Count

But the Muppet most closely associated with numbers is, of course, the Count. The Count who loves to count.Read More ›

From the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives: Blood, Rats, and Scream Queens!

We love Halloween and want to celebrate it by sharing some great Halloween themed recordings we have in our holdings. Read More ›

Sesame Street at LPA: About That Tomato...

I love collaborative exhibitions because I learn so much about our partners. Working with Susie Tofte, the archivist of the Sesame Workshop and curator of the exhibition, I learned about the Workshop’s outreach programs for families dealing with the challenges of military service and incarceration. Now that the exhibition is available for viewing, I see that section’s impact on visitors who expected only fun, children’s content.Read More ›

The Star Spangled Banner 1814-2014

October 2014 marks the 200th anniversary of the first publication of “The Star Spangled Banner.” There are only eleven copies of the first edition known to exist, and the Music Division of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts is fortunate and proud to own one of those copies.Read More ›

Jerry Bock's Demo Recordings: Fiddler on the Roof

A few months ago, I posted three demo recordings of Fiorello! from the Jerry Bock recordings in the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound. This month, in honor of Fiddler's 50th anniversary, I am happy to share six demos of Fiddler on the Roof. Read More ›

Musical of the Month: Fiddler on the Roof

In the following blog post, Alisa Solomon examines three typescripts of Fiddler on the Roof that can be studied at the Library for the Performing Arts. Her book, Wonder of Wonders: A Cultural History of Fiddler on the Roof, is available to borrow.Read More ›

In Praise of Hoots

At "Somebody Come and Play" you can see Big Bird, Cookie Monster, Bert and Ernie, the Count, Snuffy, and Oscar up close. And, by my special request, Hoots.Read More ›

Where in New York is Sesame Street?

Can I tell you how to get to Sesame Street? Well, I can try. You can get to the Sesame Street Subway Stop by the A, B, 1, or 2 trains, which if you check any MTA map, do not intersect at any current station.Read More ›
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