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Posts from New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center

Richard Attenborough's Shadowlands

Most of the articles memorializing director and actor Richard Attenborough cite his role as the nearly-mad scientist, Dr. John Hammond, in the film version of Jurassic Park or his directoral work on the film biography, Gandhi. Today, though, NPR's Morning Edition cited an interview in which Attenborough stated that his best work was the movie version of William Nicholson's play, Shadowlands.Read More ›

Listening to the Silencing of the Bird Cliffs: Listening to Coexistence with Kinokophonography

Guest post by Elin Øyen Vister.Read More ›

Subway Series at New York City Libraries This September

It’s not often that you can see a Grammy Award-winning group perform live for free, right in your own neighborhood—so be sure to catch St. Luke’s Chamber Ensemble next month at your local library. Read More ›

Robin Williams on Stage

While reading about riots in my hometown last night, I saw, out of the corner of my eye, a headline announcing the shocking death of Robin Williams. I really can add very little to the many expressions of grief from those whose for whom his films were foundational stories of childhood. Read More ›

Hirschfeld's Play of the Week

On exhibition on the 3rd floor currently are 3 of the lithographs—illustrating the Play of the Week productions of Henry IV, part 1, The Dybbuk, and Rashomon.Read More ›

Symphony of the New World: 50th Anniversary of a Pioneering Organization

In May 1964, two months before The Civil Rights Act (outlawing discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin) became law, noted conductor Benjamin Steinberg formed a committee of 13 musicians, 12 of whom were African American, with the intention of forming a new integrated orchestra called the Symphony of the New World (SNW).Read More ›

How Much is a TONY Worth to a Broadway Show?

In the week following the announcement of the TONY awards, the winner for best musical, Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, enjoyed its best week ever, bringing in more than $100,000 than the week before. The winner for best play, All The Way, seems to have been helped even more by the award, bringing in $200,000 more than the previous week. If it ever was in doubt, a TONY award is clearly good for business. At least if you win the big one.

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Punk and the [Anti-]Prom

Every year, my interns and I have the pleasure of working with the students at the High School for Fashion Industries in conjunction with the Library’s wonderful Anti-Prom projects, managed by our colleagues in Teen services. Past themes have included Goth, Monsters, Super Heroes, and Glam. This year was Punk.Read More ›

Big Deal: Researching Bob Fosse at the Library

The life and career of Fosse, the only director to win the triple crown of show business awards in one year (an Oscar for Cabaret, a Tony Award for Pippin, and an Emmy Award for Liza With a Z—all in 1973) is well-documented through the holdings of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts (LPA) and elsewhere. Clippings, reviews, posters and lobby cards, Playbills and programs—all the standard theatrical ephemera—on Fosse's shows and films are easily available in the Billy Rose Theatre Division and Jerome Robbins Dance Division. Read More ›

Vandamm in Color and Colour

Florence Vandamm was one of the greats of black and white photography, capable of modulating infinite gradations of greys. The Vandamm Theatrical Photograph Collection, and the prints elsewhere in the research divisions, support that judgment. But that doesn't mean that she and the studio didn't shoot in color. Not so. She studied and practiced color photography.Read More ›

Time Machine: Interstitial Moment, Real News for Time Travelers

With all of my past allusions to time travel, the fictional trope, I thought it was time that I accounted for my flippancy with some hard time travel news.Read More ›

Time Machine: Redacted by Time

One of my colleagues, speaking of our collection of unique recordings at the Library for the Performing Arts, has said that, “all of our recordings are made by professionals, but recording was not their profession.” These recordists are authors, dancers, actors, musicians, vocalists, and choreographers to name a few. What they share is a need to create a record that can document works that take place in time and space.Read More ›

The Beatles as Fashion Gurus

Last week, LPA hosted a public program on The Beatles and their circle as an influence on fashion in England and here. Phyllis Magidson, Curator of Costume and Textiles for the Museum of the City of New York, and I developed an illustrated conversation on their transitions from Rockers to Mods to Hippies with an occasional visit to Teddy Boys. The black, needle-nose ankle boots stuck around until the trips to India.Read More ›

Archiving Amram: The Beauty of Now

In the following blog post David Amram shares his hopes for the upcoming programs. Read More ›

Beatles Overload? 5 Beatlesque Bands You Should Hear

You can't help it, you are just so jazzed that it is The Beatles' 50th Anniversary of their appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show that you've grown your moptop, dusted off your Hofner Bass and even broke out your 

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David Amram's New York

Join Amram, plus author Bill Morgen and sociologist Audrey Sprenger, for a walking tour of the Lincoln Center campus and other nearby cultural landmarks that have influenced his life and music. David has many inspirational and charming stories to share.Read More ›

Turn Left at Greenland: The Beatles Meet the Press

The Beatles were not only wonderful songwriters and singers, but they were experts at peppering their press conferences with wit—and avoiding real answers to meaningful questions.Read More ›

Jerome Robbins Dance Division Annual Report FY 2013 Now Available

The Jerome Robbins Dance Division’s latest Annual Report FY 2013 is now online on the Library’s website documenting another full and active year for the Dance Division. The number of public programs produced by the Dance Division this year was exceptional and included three Flamenco programs, three African programs with Robert Farris Thompson, Ronald K. Brown/Evidence and Djoniba Mouflet, and the program with Princess Norodom Buppha Devi in conversation with Peter Sellars. Read More ›

I Read the Journal-American Today, Oh Dear: Beatles Files Part 2

I have been working in the Music Division since 1997 and have been a Beatles fan since I was ten years old. So, over the years, I have made an effort to keep track of any new Beatles’ related material that we acquire. The Music Division, like the theatre division, also has extensive clipping and photo files. Read More ›

Florence Vandamm: Dance Photographer?

The representation of the professional and artistic career of Florence Vandamm has a major gap, which we are doing our best to fill in. Her London scrapbook goes from 1908–1915. The Vandamm Theatrical Photographs collection documents her work in New York City, from 1924 on. We have filled in some of the gap with the Sybil Thorndike material (see earlier posts) and discoveries of images printed in magazines, such as British and New York Vogue, Vanity Fair and The Spur.Read More ›
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