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Posts from Mulberry Street Library

Artist Q&A: Ner Beck’s NYC Found Faces & Window Reflections

We welcome back Ner Beck to the Mulberry Street Branch of the New York Public Library for his exhibit NYC Found Faces & Window Reflections, on view through October 31, 2014.Read More ›

August Reader's Den: The Circle by Dave Eggers, Part II

Welcome to Part II of August in the Reader’s Den. We have been discussing Dave Egger’s novel about a monomaniacal digital corporation called The Circle. Our protagonist, Mae Holland, has grown ever more fervently to believe in the positive social impact of ‘completing’ the Circle. Read More ›

August Reader's Den: The Circle by Dave Eggers, Part I

Welcome to August in the Reader's Den! This month we will be discussing Dave Egger's novel The Circle, about an all too familiar social media mega-corporation (called The Circle) that is slowly but surely invading every single aspect of our daily lives. The central theme posits—do we even have a right to privacy anymore? What if we were forced to share the details of our private lives with everyone, and would it make for a more open and just society? Or just the opposite... Read More ›

July Reader's Den: "Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and the People Who Play It" by David Ewalt - Wrap Up

Hello and welcome to the wrap up of Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and the People Who Play It by David M. Ewalt. I hope you enjoy or are enjoying the book as much as I have. If you have any comments or questions please feel free to write below. For August the book is The Circle by David Eggers.Read More ›

July Reader's Den: "Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and the People Who Play It" by David Ewalt Part 3

Welcome back to the Reader's Den for part three of Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and the People Who Play It by David M. Ewalt. In Part two we discussed the chapters on Roleplaying. In this post we discuss the history of Dungeons & Dragons itself.Read More ›

July Reader's Den: "Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and the People Who Play It" by David Ewalt Part 2

Of Dice and Men is essentially a history of Dungeons and Dragons, but it also seeks to explain gaming to the non-gamer or the curious. Read More ›

July Reader's Den: "Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and the People Who Play It" by David Ewalt

In Of Dice and Men, David Ewalt recounts the development of Dungeons & Dragons from its roots in the games of the Ancient World and 19th Century Europe, through its many incarnations and editions and the hysteria that came with it, to its current incarnation in video games.Read More ›

Meet the Artist: Anita Thacher

On view through June 30, 2014 at the Mulberry Street Library is the collective works of SoHo neighbor and artist, Anita Thacher. The show, titled Time Present/Time Past evokes the first lines of the T.S. Eliot poem 'Four Quartets', and exclaims the evolution of Thachers work over time and over a variety of mediums. I spoke with Anita about her oeuvre. Read More ›

Craft Beer

Beer has only four ingredients: water and grain, mixed with some sort of spice, and fermented by yeast. This means it’s supposed to be easy to make. Just by changing the types of those ingredients, and their ratio you can brew pretty much every beer style. Read More ›

Meet the Artist and Curator: Sabra Friedman

On view through April 30th, 2014 at the Mulberry Street Library is the stunning collaborative effort of five teaching artists who participated in NYPL/Lifetime Arts Creative Aging classes for Older Adults. 'Artists in the Library' curated by teaching artist Sabra Friedman, showcases the work of Mary Didoardo, Sabra Friedman, John Mendelsohn, Josh Millis, and Antonia Perez.Read More ›

Meet the Artist: Yuko K.

On view through February 28, 2014, the Mulberry Street Library is proud to present the work of multi-talented artist, Yuko K. Her solo show, Colors and Icons, shows a wide range of Yuko's artistic interests—graphic iconic paintings that speak to questions of belief, meditation, and peace, as well as colorful abstracts that leave the viewer delighted and perhaps even, unnerved. I spoke to Yuko K. about her art work, her methods, and her inspirations.Read More ›

Meet the Artist: Muriel Taub Glantzman

On view through February 28th, 2014 Muriel Taub Glantzman's dynamic jazzy paintings will be on display in the Great Room of Mulbery Street Library. I had the privilege of visiting the artist in her Upper West Side studio. I spoke with Muriel about her work.

How long have you been painting?

About 70 years.

Where and with whom did you study?

I first studied with Moses Soyer in 1941-2. I attended Parsons school of 

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Cooking the Books: Adventures in Cooking with Cookbooks from the Library

The dizzying array of cookbooks available from the New York Public Library never fails to tempt. Some are lavishly illustrated, others sparse and textual. From The Best of Albanian Cooking to A Zimbabwean Cookery Book, if you can think of it, NYPL can help you cook it.

Although I love 

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Meet the Artist: John Lloyd

John Lloyd's paintings, on view at the Mulberry Street Library through December 31st, are a breath of fresh air. When you walk into the branch, you are immediately taken by Lloyd's colorfully cheerful landscapes of New York City neighborhoods. Sans traffic, litter, anxiety, and all the other things one comes to expect from a New York City landscape, Lloyd breathes peace into his canvases, artfully conveying the solace that urban 

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Banned Books Week: The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall

Radclyffe Hall's The Well of Loneliness, a candid, semi-autobiographical novel about coming to terms with a lesbian identity, brought to the forefront the question of whether or not the frank portrayal of lesbianism in a book was grounds for charges of obscenity. First published July 1928 in England by Jonathan Cape, The Well was soon seized and criminalized for violating the Obscene Publications Act of 

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Banned Books Week: Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller

Likely one of the most frequently censored books in the history of American literature, Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller is a lascivious romp involving Miller's expatriate exploits among the world of writers and artists in early 1930s Paris. The book was first published in Paris in 1934 by Obelisk Press, publishers of books that were considered controversial in England and the US, such as Radclyffe Hall's The Well of Loneliness. Prior to 1961, Tropic of Cancer was 

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Banned Books Week: Green Eggs and Ham

Our next title under the microscope during Banned Books week is the canonical nonsense tale of Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss. "I do not like them, Sam-I-am, I do not like green eggs and ham." The People's Republic of China most notably concurred with this key mantra of Dr. Seuss's Green Eggs and Ham. Beginning in 1965, it was forbidden to read Green Eggs and Ham in Maoist China because of its "portrayal of early Marxism," and the ban was not lifted until author 

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Banned Books Week: And Tango Makes Three

Greetings, and welcome to Banned Books Week! For each day of Banned Books Week, this blog will be highlighting a famous banned or challenged book. The campaign to highlght milestones in the history of banned and challenged books and promote intellectual freedom was spearheaded by library activist Judith Krug. She once said "You should have access to ideas and information regardless of your age. If anyone is going to limit or guide a young person, it should be the parent or 

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August in the Reader's Den: Slaves of New York, Part 2

Tama Janowitz and Andy WarholAugust will soon come to a close, and so we wrap up Slaves of New York by Tama Janowitz, this month's selection in the Reader's Den.

As the stories attempt to tie loose ends with familiar characters such as Eleanor and Marley, Janowitz also weaves in some stand-alone short stories about some even more downtrodden characters, such as "Case History #15, Melinda". Melinda is a bartender in Alphabet City who takes in too many stray animals, and eventually, a stray boyfriend, who inevitably betrays her. "Ode to Heroine of the 

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Meet the Artist: James Prez

Jim Prez's artwork finds a welcome home at the Mulberry Street Library. His 'book-tures' (sculptures comprised of a book base with found objects artfully fastened atop) make inspired use of thrift store bric-a-brac and second-hand books. I spoke with Jim about his booktures and other art projects.

Booktures and book reservesWhat is your background in art-making?

I have been making things since grade school but very early on I took to photography and worked on making photographs for many years. I don't have an art 

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