Click to search the Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library Skip Navigation

Posts from Kingsbridge Library

A List of Lists: July 2012

Visit NYPL's BiblioCommons for these lists and many more. You can also create your own and share them with us in the comments! See below for some interesting staff picks from the past month, on topics both timely and timeless:

Nonfiction Job Hunting Resources ... Read More ›

Old Meets New (and Hilarity Ensues) in Withering Tights by Louise Rennison

Talullah Casey is off to change her life in a very different environment. She’s going to be taking classes at a performing arts college. She will be living on the dramatic, damp, and windswept Yorkshire Dales where she can pretend to be Cathy looking for her Heathcliff. And yes, there will be snogging involved.

Talullah is the younger cousin of Georgia Nicolson, who readers may remember as the heroine of a whole series 

... Read More ›

Teen Summer Reading Spotlight: Anya’s Ghost by Vera Brosgol

Anya moved from Russia to America years ago, but even though she lost weight and lost her accent, she still has a lot of trouble making friends.  And then one day she has an accident that changes her life.  That’s the day she meets the ghost of a girl named Emily.

After Anya falls down a well, she finds a human skeleton and then moments later she sees Emily’s ghost hovering over that skeleton.  Keep in mind — that’s three traumatic incidents in a row!  So is it any wonder that Anya freaks out and starts screaming? But 

... Read More ›

Meet the Artist: Lauren Jost

Starting June 5th, the Kingsbridge Branch Library will be hosting a Memoir and Performance workshop for older adults 55+, which is part of the Creative Aging in Our Communities, a program of Lifetime Arts. During the workshop, participants will craft a short-story memoir with the help of teaching artist Lauren Jost. In this blog post, Lauren tells us a little about herself 

... Read More ›

Family Problems, Redefined: "How to Save a Life" by Sara Zarr

Jill’s father is gone, and her mother isn’t making sense anymore.

When Jill’s father died, it broke their family into pieces.

Then Jill’s mother decided to adopt a baby from an unwed teenager.

That’s the part that doesn’t make sense.

How to Save a Life by Sara Zarr is a story told in two voices. Chapters alternate between the point of view of two very different teenage girls, Jill and Mandy.

Jill is angry and upset 

... Read More ›

Kingsbridge Teens: What We’re Reading / Watching / Playing / Enjoying

The kids in my Teen Advisory Group have been going through a reviewing frenzy recently. Here are some of the books and other “stuff” they’ve been enjoying this spring.

Fiction

Hey 13! by Gary Soto This is a book of thirteen different stories about teens who go through different situations when they are thirteen years old. Most teens will be able to relate to these stories, and I really think that teens will find it to be a funny and easy book to read.

... Read More ›

Are You Ready for Hilarious Chaos? Then You're Ready for "Axe Cop"!

Axe Cop is a policeman who uses his axe to chop off the heads of bad guys. He meets many unusual characters along the way. 

There’s Dinosaur Soldier, who was part man and part dinosaur… until he ate an avocado, at which point he transformed into Avocado Soldier. 

There’s Uni-Baby, who was part baby and part unicorn… or at least... she WAS until an explosion broke off her horn, and the avocado soldier decided to use it to grant wishes. 

Then there’s Ralph Wrinkles, who was an ordinary dog until the 

... Read More ›

Fantastic Voyages and Brave New Worlds

Do you like fantasy and science fiction? Are you ready for some armchair exploration? For your reading pleasure, check out these three new books that are set in alternate futures and alternate realities!

Cinder by Marissa Meyer The Fourth World War has already come and gone, a deadly plague is spreading over the earth, and the lunar queen is waiting to make her next move. Cinder is one of the best mechanics in New Beijing, and one of the main reasons that 

... Read More ›

Doing Some Last-Minute Holiday Shopping for that Teen in Your Life?

The teens in our Teen Advisory Group have been involved in several recent brainstorming sessions to pick out their favorite books, music, and movies that were released this year. Their selections included all kinds of stuff — funny, weird, and thought-provoking — even stuff that will make you want to dance. 

MUSIC:

Unbroken by Demi Lovato

Her music is inspirational, emotional, and it makes you think!

... Read More ›

Can't Get Enough of the Undead? Check Out Dust & Decay!

Benny Imura was appalled to learn that the Apocalypse came with homework.

Thus begins Jonathan Maberry's new teen novel Dust & Decay, the eagerly-anticipated sequel to his 2010 novel Rot & Ruin.

Benny Imura is a likable hero both for his strengths and his weaknesses. At the beginning of Rot & Ruin, we were more aware of his weaknesses: he was a scared, skinny kid who didn't 

... Read More ›

Kingsbridge Teens Recommend: Our Favorite New Fiction

The new school year has just begun, but already the teens in Kingsbridge Library's Teen Advisory Group have been reading up a storm. Here are some of their favorite books from 2011 — some of them are already on our shelves, and some of them will be released in the coming months. They're all listed in our Catalog, so you can reserve copies of these new and super-new titles!

Vivien recommends Unleashed (Wolf Spring Chronicles) by Nancy Holder & Debbie Viguie.

Katelyn is a 

... Read More ›

Looking Back at How Bullies Changed Our Lives

Bullying is a horrible thing.  It sticks with you forever.  It poisons you.  But only if you let it.

These lines, from Heather Brewer's story "The Secret," touch on the prevailing themes of a new book called Dear Bully: 70 Authors Tell Their Stories.  Since October is National Bullying Prevention Month, it seemed especially appropriate to share this book right now.

Dear Bully is a collection containing stories by many authors who have written books for 

... Read More ›

Dystopian Romances for "Hunger Games" Fans

Do you love Suzanne Collins's Hunger Games trilogy? Are you REALLY hoping that the new Hunger Games movie is going to do justice to the book? Do you want to read more books in which the world as we know it has ended... and a dark and dangerous world has taken its place? Where a dark and dangerous guy (or, for that matter, a blonde and dangerous guy) will look deeply into your eyes and inspire you to fight against the society 

... Read More ›

Get Ready to Save Apathea in ... AMERICUS!

I followed a link the other day to the First Second Books website, one of my favorite publishers of graphic novels. I'm already a huge fan of Vampire Loves, the Color of Earth trilogy, Robot Dreams, American Born Chinese, Brain Camp, and

... Read More ›

Kingsbridge Teens Recommend: More of our Favorite Books, Music, Movies, and TV

As the school year ends and the members of our Teen Advisory Group plan to ride off into the sunset (or at least take a vacation or go to summer camp), I thought I would share some more of their favorite books, CDs, and DVDs that they enjoyed this year.

BOOKS:

Mistwood by Leah Cypess

This book is about a shape-shifter named Isabel who doesn't remember anything from the past.  She only knows that she exists to protect the handsome king.  Mystery and magic fans 

... Read More ›

Remembering the Year: 1991

For some reason, I’ve been feeling a lot of '90s nostalgia lately. The music, the movies, the fashion ... for me it was the decade of youthful freedom, so it is no wonder I would look back with longing. Luckily for me I have NYPL’s catalog at my disposal, which provides a huge amount of '90s books, movies, music, and resources to help me relive my glory years.

For the sake of this post, I’ve chosen the year 1991, exactly 20 years ago and a particularly fond year in my memory. The following list that I have compiled is by no 

... Read More ›

Sherlock Holmes Reimagined for Middle School and High School Students

He is instantly recognizable, even to people who have never read any of the novels and stories written about him.  He uses his powers of deductive reasoning better than almost anyone.  He never actually said, "Elementary, my dear Watson" except in the movies.  And even though he's one of the most famous detectives the world has ever known, he never really existed.

Sherlock Holmes was created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who wrote many short stories and novels about this character who soon became more famous and popular than his creator (and 

... Read More ›

The Challenges of Finding a Pocket-Sized Poem

Thursday April 14th is Poem in Your Pocket Day.  This tradition began in New York City in 2002 and expanded nationally several years later.  If you go to New York City's PIYPD page, you can learn about special events that will take place that day, and even read some poems by mayor Michael Bloomberg.  But let's get to the real question... how will you pick the right poem for your pocket?

First, let me begin with a story from my own past that emphasizes the 

... Read More ›

A Short History of the Kingsbridge Library

The Kingsbridge Library will soon be moving to a new building and as we start to plan for our move, I can't help but reflect on the long and rich history the Kingsbridge Branch has had through the years.

The Kingsbridge Library lends its beginnings to the Kingsbridge Free Library, established in 1894 and housed above Hecht's drugstore on what is now 230th St. between Kingsbridge Ave and Corlear Ave. It quickly became clear that the small space was not adequate and it grew even more imperative that the library needed a new and more 

... Read More ›

Lynda Barry's Graphic Novels About the Creative Process

Lynda Barry, most renowned for her comic strips and graphic novels featuring the character of Marlys, has written and illustrated two different books that incorporate cartoon characters into an unusual and inspiring exploration of the creative process.  One focuses more on writing and the other focuses more on artwork, but the graphic novel format means that fans of words and pictures alike will be able to appreciate both books.

What It Is

In 2008, Lynda Barry published a book that asked the 

... Read More ›
Previous Page 3 of 5 Next

Chat with a librarian now

Blog-Location Link