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Posts from Jefferson Market Library

Epistolary Novels and Letter Writing

"Epistolary" is one of those words that just fun to say or think about, like the word "condensation". An epistolary novel is simply a novel consisting of correspondence between characters. This is one of those rarely used writing devices, I assume because it's difficult to sustain throughout a novel.Read More ›

The Reader's Den: Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man is Hard to Find"

Flannery O'Connor's short story, "A Good Man is Hard to Find," originally published in the 1955 collection of the same name, has all the classic O'Connor elements: humor, irony, tragedy, and evil. It starts off innocently enough: a grandmother sets off on a road trip with her son, Bailey, and his family: a wife, two kids, and a baby.Read More ›

The Reader's Den: Flannery O'Connor's "The Displaced Person"

In Flannery O'Connor's short story "The Displaced Person," originally published in the 1955 collection A Good Man is Hard to Find, racism, prejudice, and distrust take center stage.Read More ›

Memory Circles Bring History to Life at Jefferson Market Library

Jefferson Market Library was alive with the energy of storytelling last Thursday, March 13th as storytellers and interviewers for the Greenwich Village Oral History Project took over the library. It was an evening of Memory Circles, or recorded group oral histories, in which participants talked with each other about their shared recollections on particular Greenwich Village themes.Read More ›

The Reader's Den: Flannery O'Connor's "The Life You Save May Be Your Own"

Flannery O'Connor's "The Life You Save May Be Your Own" was originally published in the 1955 short story collection, A Good Man is Hard to Find. Like many of her short stories, it centers around the appearance of a stranger on the horizon, (literally, in this case!) and that stranger's effect on the lives of others.Read More ›

March in the Reader's Den: Flannery O'Connor

Over the next three weeks, we will be discussing three of her most well known short stories, all included in A Good Man is Hard to Find (1955) and The Complete Stories (1971).Read More ›

I Heard It Through The Grapevine: Reliving the History of Greenwich Village with Author John Strausbaugh

“Greenwich Village is so steeped in history, there are literally a bazillion stories of this, the most famous neighborhood in the world. Coming together in this tiny spec of real estate, people bounced off each other to become the cultural center of the country and the world. I could have written 6 books on this topic,” said Strausbaugh in his opening remarks at Jefferson Market Library.Read More ›

Meet the Speakers at our Fulton Fish Market Talk!

This Wednesday, February 26 from 6-7:45 p.m. at Jefferson Market Library, come to an evening of memory, protest and plans. Here's some information about the upcoming speakers.Read More ›

The Jefferson Market University: Spring 2014

The Jefferson Market Library is pleased to offer the following free courses for the spring semester, 2014.Read More ›

Greenwich Village Oral History Project: Celebrating Its Launch

On Thursday, January 16 a group of storytellers, interviewers and library staff gathered at Jefferson Market Library to celebrate the launch of Your Village, Your Story: Greenwich Village Oral History Project. On Thursday's kick-off event, the room was full of energy and with 30 oral histories collected already, there was plenty to celebrate!Read More ›

Your Village, Your Story: Jefferson Market's Greenwich Village Oral History Project Begins

On Thursday, November 14, twelve volunteer interviewers sat in a circle in the first floor auditorium at Jefferson Market Library having a dynamic conversation about the nature of memory, open interview questions, and the history of Greenwich Village. This was the first of several volunteer interviewer orientations for Your Village, Your Story: Greenwich Village Oral History Project.

"Why are you interested in this project?" I asked everyone in attendance as an introductory question. Some people were there because 

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The NYPL Photo Booth Comes to the Jefferson Market Library!

People come to the Jefferson Market Library for a wide variety of reasons:  to sit and study in a beautiful, quiet space or to pickup their holds or to take a continuing education course in science, art and languages—these among many other reasons! Now you, the visitor to this historic NYPL branch library in Greenwich Village, can commemorate your visit because we now have the NYPL traveling photo booth!  

The photo booth, previously at the Mid-Manhattan Library, offers patrons preselected options for what 

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Halloween Reads IV: The Repass

It's that time of year again, when Halloween book and media picks are falling like harvest leaves. Here's a small, but spooky, selection.Read More ›

On the Origin of Some Phrases

Growing up, I used to hear the phrase "what do you want, egg in your beer?" all the time. Although I have many occasions in which I'd like to use it, I never have because I know it would only garner perplexing looks. I looked into it recently and it's from WWII and it seems to be somewhat self-explanatory as egg in beer is 

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Mermaid Parade

I was musing aloud about what the next supernatural fiction trend may be, now that vampires and werewolves have had their day. I jokingly said mermaids/mermen, but it looks like there may be something to that after all. A recent Joss Whedon film (

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Following Cheryl Strayed's Journey on the Pacific Crest Trail

How interesting could a book about a long walk possibly be? In the case of Cheryl Strayed's book Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, the answer is very. Some may have foolishly initially shied away from this book because it's an Oprah's Book Club selection and a memoir, a combination that proved problematic for

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Drawing People and Places: Gearing Up!

At Jefferson Market Library, our 10 week drawing course for adults 55+ is drawing to a close, and we are gearing up to host an event celebrating the artists who have participated.

We will be showcasing all of the work that the students have created, on Friday May 17th from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. in our first floor auditorium. Please join us to see what has been created 

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Flappers and Philosophers: F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald and Their Contemporaries

The newest film version of The Great Gatsby is opening in theaters on May 10th. This is the fifth time this story has been filmed, I believe. This version boasts a modern soundtrack and promises to deliver on the fashion and visual excesses of the "Jazz Age," if director Baz 

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Opera for the Uninitiated

The Gilded Stage: A Social History of the Opera by Daniel Snowman promises to do what few nonfiction books about opera have done thus far: describe the evolution of opera from everyman's entertainment to one, believed by many, to be reserved for those of a select social sphere.

In the Literary Review by Tim 

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Audubon Day is April 26th

Many have heard about slow food, but fewer still about slow looking. This Wall Street Journal article from 2011 coined the term, referring to LSU's Hill Memorial Library and the way in which they presented their collection of John James Audubon's four-volume Birds of America (1827-38): slowing turning the pages for a rapt audience.

Closer to home and until May 19th, the New-York 

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