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The New York Public Library will be closed on Monday, October 12 in observance of Columbus Day.

Staff Picks: Drowned City by Don Brown

Every month, library staff members are bringing you 100 books we love, culled from the millions upon millions out in the world.Read More ›

What’s Making Us Happy, Part 2

What’s making us happy in the realms of TV, cooking, art and design, libraries, and online thingamabobs, and then happinesses that defy categorization.Read More ›

Zine Machine

Imagine, if you will, a time when photocopiers had supplanted the lowly mimeograph machine. This technology gave way to the birth of the zine.Read More ›

Origin Stories

There are a couple kinds of origin stories. There are the backstories that super heroes have to explain how they got their powers. There are origin stories that describe how some reality came into existence. Our staff recommend some favorites here.Read More ›

Empathy for Animals, On Land and Underseas

This summer, why not explore some great nonfiction science reads about animals, both on land and underseas, and the ways in which they continually surprise humans.Read More ›

Beyond Bond

We asked library staff to investigate Ian Fleming's legacy and go “beyond Bond”—to pick out other books starring secret agents.Read More ›

The Digital Villager: Summertime, 1945

August 2, 1945: The high temperature in New York City was 84 degrees, and the second World War was drawing to a close. Where were Greenwich Villagers going to wile away the hot evening hours? Why, Little Shrimp, The Golden Eagle, and Dick the Oyster Man, of course!Read More ›

Book Club Inception Books

What are some book club books about book clubs? Or books that mention what books the characters are reading?Read More ›

Out of This World: Books About Interplanetary Travel

Our expert NYPL librarians recommend their favorite books about interplanetary travel.Read More ›

Mystery Without End... Literally

Raymond Chandler famously said, “The ideal mystery is one you would read even if the end is missing.” In honor of his birthday this week, we asked our librarian experts to name mysteries they’d read even if there were no endings—books so compelling, with such great characters or such an evocative setting, that the story itself is just a bonus.Read More ›

The Digital Villager: Bargain Hunting at Hearn's

Picture it: The year is 1933, and you need a new coat! Chances are, you'd be headed to Hearn's. This department store, located on 14th Street between 5th and 6th Avenues from 1879 until 1955, was a New York shopping mecca. Read More ›

Running Away With the Circus

Have you ever wondered why no one ever calmly joins the circus?Read More ›

Can You Grok This? Stories of Strangers in a Strange Land, Part 1

In honor of Robert Heinlein's birthday, we asked our NYPL librarians: What are some other books that speak to displacement—of being a stranger in a strange land?Read More ›

Reader's Den: After Claude, Week 3

Thank you for joining us this month in the Reader’s Den, as we continue our year long focus on superheroes and anti-heroes, with the ultimate antiheroine, After Claude's Harriet.Read More ›

Madame Bovary's Cultural Mark

Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary was more than just an exciting novel, it set a standard for novels, and created a buzzword about having a glamorized, exaggerated conception about oneself.Read More ›

Reader's Den: After Claude by Iris Owens, Week 2

After Claude's Harriet is nothing if not offensive. So, is it wrong to kind of want to hang out with her, if only for a few hours? That question and more, in this week's discussion questions! Read More ›

Librarians on ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’

Personal reflections on Harper Lee's first (and until now, only) novel.Read More ›

The Reader's Den: After Claude by Iris Owens

I came to Iris Owens and her 1973 novel, After Claude, after looking through seemingly endless lists looking for the perfect literary antiheroine, in keeping with this year's Reader's Den theme of superheroes and antiheroes. Read More ›

Physicists Who Looked To Literature

Literature provides ample inspiration to scientific fields, as these examples show—and vice versa.Read More ›

Reader's Den: The Secret History of Wonder Woman, Part 4

Critical reception and further reading from the author, Jill Lepore.Read More ›
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