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Posts from Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

Bill Barvin's Location Photography

William "Bill" Barvin worked for over two decades as a location manager and scout for television and film, taking thousands of photos during the course of his career of New York and New Jersey streets, apartments, storefronts, and rooftops; bars, clubs, restaurants, and theaters; hotels, hospitals, laundromats, and churches.Read More ›

Del papel a la web: haz tus propios mapas interactivos.

Una guía para trabajar con varias herramientas web gratuitas para que puedas hacer tus propios mapas interactivos. Read More ›

Love Letters 101: Epistolary Lessons from Rare Books

Universal letter-writers were guidebooks meant to teach young men and women the art of writing and speaking fluently on a variety of subjects—including love.Read More ›

Jüdischer Frontsoldaten: German-Jewish Soldiers in WWI

While Jewish soldiers served on both sides of the Great War, what I found most interesting was the mindset of Jewish soldiers fighting for Germany. They fought to establish themselves and their identity as German Jews, fighting for a nation who would aim to eradicate their families in the decades to come. We see early signs of what was to come during the Great War, starting from the Judenzählung.Read More ›

The Archive in the White Suit: The Tom Wolfe Papers Now Open

The collection, which was acquired by The Library in 2014, fills over 200 boxes and will be a vital resource for the study of Wolfe's writing process, his journalism-based research methods, and the creation of his hugely successful works.Read More ›

20 Reasons Why You Should Write Your Family History

If you have done any family history research, such as looking for records on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org or conducting interviews with older family members, you may have pondered writing about your genealogy research. Here are 20 reasons why you should cease pondering and start writing.Read More ›

Beyond the Title Page: Watermarks, Colophons, and Publishing Dates

What started as a simple comparison of beautifully illustrated books on fashionable dress, trades’ dress, and ethnic costume held in both the Art and Architecture Collection and the Rare Book Division turned into an open-ended bibliographic exercise with many rabbit holes to get lost in. Read More ›

Jersey Genealogy: A Research Guide Using Local History Collections

Perhaps familiar to New Yorkers as a garden state of smokestacks, or surrogate playing field for the Jets and Giants, or otherworld of childhood memory, New Jersey bucks understanding from without and blinkers perspective from within. If your genealogy research leads you to New Jersey, find help with this guide.Read More ›

Yiddish Theater Posters of the 1890s

Our Digital Collection includes Yiddish theater posters dating back more than a hundred years. These ephemeral pieces, with their bold titles, portraits of actors, and exuberant descriptions of plays, illustrate the dynamic Yiddish theater tradition.Read More ›

The Photography of Helen Levitt

Helen Levitt was one of this century’s great photographers. Were I to say this about her great friend Walker Evans, it would seem like a tautology, rather like saying that Shakespeare was an important writer. Readers can judge for themselves why this should be the case, why one should need to say this about Helen.Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: February 2015

The following titles are just a few of our new books, all available at the reference desk in Room 111. Read More ›

Short-Term Research Fellowship: Evert A. Duyckinck's Social Network

A look at the papers of two brothers who were at the center of New York publishing in the mid-1800s.Read More ›

Juana Vargas "La Macarrona:" A Flamenco Treasure

The footage of Juana Vargas "La Macarrona" (1870-1947), filmed in 1917 by Léonide Massine and held in the Jerome Robbins Dance Division at the Library for the Performing Arts, is one of the Library's most important, and little-known, flamenco treasures. As a member of the Wertheim study, I was honored to be invited to write a blog post about the Library's significant holdings related to flamenco. Read More ›

More Nordic Noir

With the bleakest part of the winter now upon us, some readers may be craving a feast of Scandinavian noir. Here are a few more contemporary Swedes (and one Norwegian) I've enjoyed.Read More ›

Glimpses of Alice

To celebrate Lewis Carroll’s upcoming birthday—and my un-birthday!—let’s venture down the rabbit hole to explore depictions of Alice, his most famous creation, here at the library.Read More ›

Then & Now: Dinanda Nooney in 1970s Brooklyn

Between January 1978 and April 1979, Nooney networked her way through Brooklyn documenting residences and their occupants, asking each for a referral to another willing subject. Over 150 families or individuals entrusted her to capture glimpses into their private worlds and personal tastes.Read More ›

The Changing Face of Times Square

Which way to Longacre Square? Now known as Times Square, the area at the intersection of Broadway and Seventh Avenue has long offered both the high life and the underbelly of New York City.Read More ›

What’s Your Story? Conducting Interviews for Genealogical Research

Family history research often begins with an interview. Speaking with your family to discover names, dates, locations, and important life events is one of the most important steps in delving into the genealogy world.Read More ›

From Paper Maps to the Web: A DIY Digital Maps Primer

A primer on working with various free web mapping tools so you can make your own awesome maps.Read More ›

A Photographic Bible Fit for a Queen

Frith made his photographs available in various formats that suited different budgets, from inexpensive stereographs to multi-volume books illustrated with tipped-in albumen prints. His books are currently on view in the Library’s exhibition, Public Eye: 175 Years of Sharing Photography.Read More ›
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