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Posts from Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

Preservation Week Lecture: Be An Informed Consumer of Custom Picture Framing

For Preservation Week 2015, the Preservation Division will be giving lectures on caring for your personal collections. I am composing a talk entitled Be An Informed Consumer of Custom Picture Framing. Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: April 2015

The following titles are just a few of our new books, all available at the reference desk in Room 111. Read More ›

30 Days of Poetry: A Kid's Eye-View of WPA-Era New York City

The Doughnut Boy and Other Poems offers a glimpse of New York City through the eyes of a sassy little beret-wearing, doughnut-loving, public-transit-taking, library-visiting child.Read More ›

Podcast #54: Jeffrey Deitch on Art and Spectacle

For this week's podcast, Jeffrey Deitch and New Museum Artistic Director Massimiliano Gioni discuss artistic communities, cross-media creation, and spectacle.Read More ›

Madame du Châtelet and Fighting the Invincible Force

Madame du Châtelet was a French noblewoman of the Enlightenment who came from a wealthy family, married into a position of prominence, raised several children, and studied as a member of the Republic of Letters. However, in her native France, the Academy of Sciences, universities, and many intellectual gatherings excluded women. She was forced to pursue a path of independent study.Read More ›

A Quick Guide to Jewish Periodicals

Where to find periodicals online, in microfim, and in print, compiled by the Dorot Jewish Division.Read More ›

Fairy Tales With a Twist

These titles give the back story of our favorite fairy tale characters, tell what happens after "happily ever after," or when people from our world are tossed into the fairy tale world. Read More ›

Ask the Author: T.C. Boyle

T.C. Boyle comes to Books at Noon next Wednesday, April 1 to discuss his latest work, The Harder They Come. We asked him six questions about what he likes to read.Read More ›

Matzah and Melodrama: Nahum Stutchkoff's Yiddish Song Lyrics

Nahum Stutchkoff (1893-1965) was a beloved Yiddish radio personality, playwright, lyricist and linguist who created dramas and commercials for WEVD radio and compiled a Yiddish rhyming dictionary and thesaurus. Once a household name among New York Yiddish speakers, he even appeared in ads for Beech-Nut Gum, Seagram’s Whiskey, and Planter’s High Hat Peanut Oil.Read More ›

Ask the Author: Frank Bruni

Frank Bruni comes to Books at Noon next Wednesday, March 18 to discuss his latest work, Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania. We asked him six questions about what he likes to read.Read More ›

Why Is New York City Called the Big Apple?

New York is a city of nicknames. The City That Never Sleeps, Empire City, The City So Nice They Named It Twice… and of course Gotham, which we’ve covered before. Today let’s just look at the Big Apple.Read More ›

Lawmen and Badmen: The Tin Star of the Old West

In the early American West, the lawman might be a U.S. marshal, appointed by the Attorney General, or he might be a local sheriff elected to office by the townfolk. The distinction often makes no difference in old Western movies, but is an optimum detail in the pursuit of genealogy and local history research in the Milstein Division, where reference librarians must wrangle between the local, county, state, and federal levels in order to rope in relevant resources for patron requests.Read More ›

Street Prostitute, Fort-Monjol, April 19, 1921, by Eugène Atget

Eugène Atget took relatively few pictures of people. There is a series dating from about 1898 to 1900 of people in the small trades (petits métiers): the ragpicker, the organ grinder, ambulatory vendors of herbs, lampshades, plaster statues, baskets. And then there is a small series on prostitutes, from 1921.Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: March 2015

The following titles are just a few of our new books, all available at the reference desk in Room 111. Read More ›

Bill Barvin's Location Photography

William "Bill" Barvin worked for over two decades as a location manager and scout for television and film, taking thousands of photos during the course of his career of New York and New Jersey streets, apartments, storefronts, and rooftops; bars, clubs, restaurants, and theaters; hotels, hospitals, laundromats, and churches.Read More ›

Del papel a la web: haz tus propios mapas interactivos.

Una guía para trabajar con varias herramientas web gratuitas para que puedas hacer tus propios mapas interactivos. Read More ›

Love Letters 101: Epistolary Lessons from Rare Books

Universal letter-writers were guidebooks meant to teach young men and women the art of writing and speaking fluently on a variety of subjects—including love.Read More ›

Jüdischer Frontsoldaten: German-Jewish Soldiers in WWI

While Jewish soldiers served on both sides of the Great War, what I found most interesting was the mindset of Jewish soldiers fighting for Germany. They fought to establish themselves and their identity as German Jews, fighting for a nation who would aim to eradicate their families in the decades to come. We see early signs of what was to come during the Great War, starting from the Judenzählung.Read More ›

The Archive in the White Suit: The Tom Wolfe Papers Now Open

The collection, which was acquired by The Library in 2014, fills over 200 boxes and will be a vital resource for the study of Wolfe's writing process, his journalism-based research methods, and the creation of his hugely successful works.Read More ›

20 Reasons Why You Should Write Your Family History

If you have done any family history research, such as looking for records on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org or conducting interviews with older family members, you may have pondered writing about your genealogy research. Here are 20 reasons why you should cease pondering and start writing.Read More ›
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