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Posts from Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

Celebrating African American Jews

In honor of African American History Month, the Dorot Jewish Division celebrates African American Jewish authors and achievements.Read More ›

A Trivial Blog Post for Serious People

An unassuming black notebook contains the earliest draft of Oscar Wilde’s play The Importance of Being Earnest, written by hand and with the author’s frequent emendations.Read More ›

Elizabeth De Hart Bleecker Diary, February 8, 1800

Elizabeth De Hart Bleecker lived through a tumultuous period in the history of labor in New York City. Here is a page from her diary, 216 years ago today.Read More ›

Immortality and the Fear of Death

Philosophical writings on mortality and the fear of death.Read More ›

3 Reasons to Use Find My Past for Family History Research

Find My Past holds many useful records for furthering your family history research. Here are three reasons to explore this database and continue your genealogical journey:Read More ›

Coming Soon: The Hunt-Lenox Globe, in 3D!

The New York Public Library received a generous grant from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation to scan the globe using 3D imaging technology. The project was undertaken in conjunction with the Lazarus Project, an organization that provides historical researchers access to advanced imaging technology.Read More ›

Voices of Holocaust Survivors: Oral Histories and Personal Narratives

Survivors’ personal stories are a powerful primary source for learning about the Holocaust. Explore the Library’s collection of oral histories, autobiographies, biographies and memoirs of Holocaust survivors.Read More ›

Hannah Lawrence Schieffelin's Journey Through Revolutionary America

On September 15, 1780, Hannah Lawrence Schieffelin “abandoned the paternal mansion that so long bounded my wishes,” boarded a “small vessel,” and left her home in New York for Quebec. Her narrative describes events, peoples, and places far removed from the center of the American Revolutionary struggle.Read More ›

The Diary of Elizabeth De Hart Bleecker, 1799-1806

Periodically, for the next year, we will write blog posts featuring a single entry, or a series of entries, from the Bleecker diary: a source from and about New York City in its formative era.Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: January 2016

The following titles on our Recent Acquisitions Display are just a few of our new books, which are available at the reference desk in the Dorot Jewish Division. Catalog entries for the books can be found by clicking on their covers.Read More ›

Printing Women: Ambreen Butt

Please click the image to view Ambreen Butt's blog about '(Untitled) Dragon Woman' and the importance of giving "a face to the female in the black veil." The exhibition, 'Printing Women' focuses on Henrietta Louisa Koenen’s (1830–1881) collection and signals women’s continuing participation in printmaking as well as the Library’s longstanding commitment to acquiring and exhibiting prints made by women from around the world. Read More ›

Silas Deane: Reading and Parenting in Revolutionary America

Political elites are well represented in archival collections. One of the great virtues for historians is that a lot of their family correspondence survives, though it is not always included in edited volumes that focus on political events. Through these papers we can glimpse family life at an emotional level.Read More ›

Ep. 3 "A Job for the Summer" | Library Stories

Evan Chesler is the Chairman of the Board of The New York Public Library, but his Library Story started long before he assumed that role. When he encountered an obstacle that nearly destroyed his dream of going to law school, he used hard work and the Library to push himself forward. Read More ›

The Library's New Mellon Director

The Library's Mellon Director leads the Library's four research centers and their 460 staff members—the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street; the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture; the Science, Industry and Business Library; and the Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center. Read More ›

Printing Women: Valerie Hammond

Please click the image to view Valerie Hammond's blog about 'Blue Anemone' and "the indefinable boundary between presence and absence." The exhibition, 'Printing Women' focuses on Henrietta Louisa Koenen’s (1830–1881) collection and signals women’s continuing participation in printmaking as well as the Library’s longstanding commitment to acquiring and exhibiting prints made by women from around the world. Read More ›

Santa's New York Roots

How was the iconic image of Santa born? Several New Yorkers inspired the personality, appearance, and traditions of this holiday favorite.Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: December 2015

The following titles on our Recent Acquisitions Display are just a few of our new books, which are available at the reference desk in the Dorot Jewish Division. Read More ›

You Buy Art, We Buy Bonds: Art Galleries in NYC during WWII

Was the “buy American” movement a reality in the New York art gallery world during World War II? Read More ›

Using Postcards for Local History Research

Postcards are a fantastic visual resource for a place’s past that are often underutilized by scholars. They offer rich evidence of culture and architecture as a visual record of the past.Read More ›

Landsmanshaftn in New York: A Quick Online Guide

Landsmanshaftn are Jewish community organizations of immigrants from the same city in Eastern or Central Europe. Their documents provide important information for genealogical research.Read More ›
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