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Posts from Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

The Great War and Modern Mapping: WWI in the Map Division

Among the hundreds of maps from the Great War, you'll find commercial maps produced for sale to the general public, pictorial propaganda maps, newspaper maps intended to illustrate the unfolding conflict, and military maps produced for a variety of purposes including training, planning offensive and defensive operations, troop dispositions and more. The languages printed on the map mirror the international range of the conflict.Read More ›

Researching New York City Neighborhoods

Redefined by the city’s growth, changing populations, and the plans of real estate developers, New York City neighborhoods are ever-evolving entities. They can be researched through our collections—useful materials include neighborhood and borough-specific histories, NYC guidebooks, city agency reports, local newspapers, clippings, statistical data, and maps.Read More ›

Interpretations of Timothy O’Sullivan’s "Ancient Ruins"

This incredibly stunning image depicts ancient architectural structures embedded within a cave of a large cliff. The image is often on view in art museums, even though the image was first created for a topographical survey. It is fully embedded with photography’s complex relationship to science and art.Read More ›

Growing Up Chinese-American: Books for Young Readers

When I was growing up in the ’70s there was very little in the way of books that reflected who I was—a first generation Chinese-American girl living in New York City. I read everything I could get my hands on, but I could never see myself in the books from school or in the library.Read More ›

People of the (Online) Book: Jewish Texts Online

Here’s a brief guide to Jewish books online, including reference works, religious texts and literature. Read More ›

Subway Construction: Then and Now

Recent photos, compared side by side with photographs of the construction of New York’s first subway, which opened in 1904, provide stark contrasts. They are evidence of an industry drastically changed: the methods of construction used, the condition and expressions of the workers, and the scale of the projects differ in striking ways.Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: May 2015

The following titles are just a few of our new books, all available at the reference desk in Room 111.Read More ›

Ask the Author: Alan Cumming

Alan Cumming comes to Books at Noon next Wednesday, May 6 to discuss his latest work, Not My Father's Son. We asked him six questions about what he likes to read.Read More ›

Remembering Our Ancestors: Maps and Genealogy Resources for Armenian-Americans

As an Armenian-American keenly aware of the devotion to lost homeland of my ethnic compatriots, I’ve always been on the lookout for Armenians among the researchers from many large ethnic groups who have found their way to the Map Division. April 24 is the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the Armenian Genocide, and one way to honor those who were not able to find refuge is to learn all we can about them and celebrate our link to them.Read More ›

The Case of the False Quixote

I recently came across a third volume of Don Quixote. Cervantistas among you know that this novel, the full title of which is El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha, consists of two parts only. What’s more, the author listed is not Cervantes, but “the Licentiate Alonzo Fernandez de Avellaneda.” So what exactly is going on here?Read More ›

Remembering (the Hardly Trivial) Sam Houston: Rare Texana at the Library

April 21 is the anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto. As any grade school student in the Lone Star State will proudly tell you, the leader of the Texan forces was Samuel “Sam” Houston, a.k.a. the President of the Republic of Texas. He is well-represented in NYPL's collection of Texana.Read More ›

Erasures in Literature

Erasure is a form of literature, often poetry, created by selectively erasing words from an existing text to produce a new work. An event on April 25 will showcase examples and give you a chance to create your own.Read More ›

Preservation Week 2015: Taking Care of Your Collections at Home

You have collections at home—drawers full of video tapes, shelves packed with CDs, DVDs and books, files stuffed with photos and documents, hard drives filled with data… How can you take care of your own collections, to make sure they're protected, to make sure they last?Read More ›

Strasbourg's Most Splendid Party

On October 5, 1744, the city of Strasbourg threw a party that would last through the five following days. There were processions, ceremonies, arches of triumph, costumed children, music, dancing, banquets, fireworks, jousting, water games, allegorical figures, decorated barges, and pageantry of all sorts. It was a most splendid party.Read More ›

Du papier au Web : créez vos propres cartes interactives

Comment créer vos propres cartes géo-référencées à l’aide d’outils Web gratuits.Read More ›

For the Love of Poetry

I always tell kids that it is okay if they are not fans of a certain genre or literary form as there is something in the library for everyone. You never know when you will find something, like a silly poem about boogers, that will tickle your funny bone and get you excited about reading. Read More ›

The Arm That Clutched the Torch: The Statue of Liberty’s Campaign for a Pedestal

France proposed to bestow the Statue of Liberty to the United States, while Americans were asked to fundraise for its pedestal. The plan to raise money? Her arm went on tour.Read More ›

Upgrading Front-End Apps to AngularJS 1.3

When the Digital Experience team began working on updating the Research Divisions page, we decided to use the newer AngularJS 1.3 version. When we decided to upgrade from the 1.2 version to the 1.3 version for the larger Locations project, the front-end team ran into large code changes, different coding styles, and best practice decisions we had to discuss.Read More ›

The Union Remembers Lincoln

Upon learning of the president’s death, the nation responded with shock, confusion, outrage, and sorrow. This tumultuous period was captured by the printing and photography of the time: both in immediate ephemera and later, more contemplative works. Read More ›

NYC Rapid Transit in Maps, 1845-1921: The Street Railroads of New York and Vicinity

We can gain a deep understanding of the development of the city’s public transit infrastructure simply by examining nine maps published between 1845 and 1921. Read More ›
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