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Reintroducing the Boston Committee of Correspondence Records

Looking back on the Revolution in 1815, John Adams remarked that “The History of the United States never can be written” without the records of the Boston Committee of Correspondence. Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: October 2015

The following titles on our Recent Acquisitions Display are just a few of our new books, which are available at the reference desk in the Dorot Jewish Division. Catalog entries for the books can be found by clicking on their covers.Read More ›

Understanding the Syrian Refugee Crisis

Over the past several weeks, we've heard a lot about the plight of refugees fleeing Syria and its neighboring countries for safer and more stable living conditions in Europe. Such a systemic, rapidly-changing issue can be hard comprehend, but we are confronted with images and stories that beg for our understanding.Read More ›

Louisa May Alcott, In Her Own Words

On September 30, 1868, the first volume of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women was published. The New York Public Library has many, many copies of Little Women and its sequels.Read More ›

The Natural History of Early Modern Needlework

From the sixteenth century on, men -- rather than women -- developed pattern books on which women based their needlepoint work. This blog explores the works of two late sixteenth and seventeenth-century women, Isabella Parasole and Maria Sibylla Merian, who overthrew these conventions, first by creating textile patterns for women and then by branching out into the study of natural history, a field that was dominated by male explorers and discoverers. Read More ›

Bruce Jay Friedman, A Story Teller: Humanizing Humility

The term Black Humor was coined in the 1960s by critics who regarded him as a founder, and although Friedman admits that he was never fond of the term, it is true that he helped pioneer this darker comic tone that was grimmer than conventional satire.Read More ›

Running and Reading Into the NYC Marathon

Books about runners and different running cultures. For children, dreams and goals start when they pick up a book at the library. Even now, I experience the same feelings picking up these running books and still get inspired to set new goals.Read More ›

Yiddish Theater Research: A Quick Online Guide

General works, plays, biography, images, and archives pertaining to Yiddish Theater.Read More ›

The Palimpsest of Justice: Law, Narrative, and the Romantic Self

From 1750 to 1830, the legal landscape of Great Britain was significantly transformed. An accusatory form of trial gave way to an adversarial format—which was echoed in the periodical wars of the romantic press. Read More ›

Hubble and the Sublime: The Fear of the Infinite

From exploding stars to colliding galaxies, the photos from Hubble make us aware of the staggering immensity of the universe. The glimpse of eternity that these sublime images offer can arouse anxiety, even terror.Read More ›

Unexpected Sources: Slave Cloth in the Richard Henry Lee Letters

One of the most surprising letters I have recently come across is held in a small group of Richard Henry Lee correspondence: a passing reference that serves as an indication of slavery’s enormous economic influence.Read More ›

Blue Pencil in the Blue Room: City Tabloids, Old Laws, and the Painted Ladies

This past month in New York City, political issues have surrounded the Painted Ladies of Times Square like googly-eyed tourists with cameras on selfie sticks. The uproar fittingly abides the municipal brouhaha over the last 100 years that has possessed the behavioral pressure cooker of Times Square. 'Twas ever thus.Read More ›

Book Recommendations on Node.js and React

Looking for a new book to read this month? Check out this monthly list of 100 books chosen by NYPL staff members on Staff Picks. Choose an age category, choose one or more themes that interest you to further filter the list, and then choose a book or ebook to borrow from NYPL.

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Jewish Genealogy: A Quick Online Guide

Find out how to get information about your Jewish roots. Links to vital records, Holocaust resources, name origins, and Jewish genealogy collections.Read More ›

Online Research: Where to Start

The New York Public Library has a huge selection of online content to help with your research, whether it's finding a single article, tracing a family tree, writing a dissertation, or anything in between. Read More ›

Untapped E-Resources: American Broadsides and Ephemera

What is this curious artifact of daily life in 19th century America?Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: August 2015

The following titles on our Recent Acquisitions Display are just a few of our new books, which are available at the reference desk in the Dorot Jewish Division. Catalog entries for the books can be found by clicking on their covers.Read More ›

New York on the Front Line: The Black Tom Island Explosion, July 1916

On Sunday morning, July 30, 1916, at 2:08 a.m., one of the worst terrorist attacks in American history took place at Black Tom Island, New Jersey, a shipping facility located in New York Harbor. Read More ›

Now Screening: New Electronic Resources, July 2015

Overview of National Geographic Virtual Library, Nineteenth Century U.S. Newspapers, and Indigenous Peoples: North America.Read More ›

Traces from Jefferson's Account Book: The Hemings Family

The New York Public Library has just digitized Jefferson’s manuscript account book from 1791 to 1803. The volume is basically a day-by-day running record of Jefferson’s transactions. The account book offers a glimpse of how Jefferson interacted with his world on a daily basis.Read More ›
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