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Posts from Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

The Ultimate E-Alike Gift Guide

During the holiday shopping season, the weather outside may be frightful — not to mention the crowds and the credit card statements — but your NYPL library card is so delightful! In addition to borrowing books, CDs, and DVDs, your library card gives you access to hundreds of online databases. These databases contain so many different resources, you may not need to leave your house to stuff your stocking. All of the “e-alikes” suggested below are available for free to our patrons, and you don’t even have to be at a library to use 

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Celebrating Transgender Jews

In honor of Transgender Awareness Week, the Dorot Jewish Division celebrates transgender Jews with these inspiring stories and recommended reading.Read More ›

Remembering Manhattan's Little Syria

Centered on Washington Street and Rector Street on the west side of Lower Manhattan, was once a neighborhood known as Little Syria. Located near the now-gone Washington Market and just south of the current location of the World Trade Center, it was a vibrant neighborhood characterized by store signs in Arabic, men and women in cultural clothing including veils and fezzes, and food such as Baklava in the cafes.Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: November 2015

The following titles on our Recent Acquisitions Display are just a few of our new books, which are available at the reference desk in the Dorot Jewish Division. Catalog entries for the books can be found by clicking on their covers.Read More ›

Happy Birthday to Everyone's Favorite White Whale

Saturday, November 14 marks the anniversary of the publication of Melville's masterpiece, Moby-Dick. In honor of this occasion, I made a "cool, collected dive" into the Library's collections, to share early editions, illustrated works, whale charts, and even scrimshaw—works that speak to the universe within this leviathan of a novel. Read More ›

The United States of Fredonia?

“It was a great oversight” of the Constitution’s framers that they did not give the United States a “proper name.” Read More ›

Emigrant City: Two Stories

The recently digitized ledgers contain details of 6,400 mortgages held by customers at the bank, between 1851 and 1921, information that, until now, was available only on microfilm.Read More ›

How to Research Dutch Ancestors

Primarily focusing on library collections, this guide presents a select list of materials useful for researching Dutch ancestors in New Netherland and colonial New York. Find information on research strategies, family histories, early directories, church records, Dutch genealogy periodicals, and more.Read More ›

Evelyn Waugh and His "Most Offensive Work"

While in Hollywood consulting on a potential film adaptation of Brideshead that never materialized, Waugh observed American West Coast culture up close. His reaction was... not flattering.Read More ›

Founding Firefighters: Volunteer Firefighters and Early American Constitutional History

The Chelsea Fire Club formed in late 1788 to protect the people and buildings of Norwich, Connecticut from being destroyed by fire. The records of the Fire Club reveal far more about how early Americans grappled with the challenge of self-government than about firefighting. Read More ›

Books We Know by Heart

Reading a book aloud to a child is one of life’s sweetest pleasures, and children sometimes ask to repeat the experience with the same book over and over. And over. And over.Read More ›

Printing Women: Sara Sanders

Please click the image to view Sara Sanders' blog post on her Chairs and their relation to our personal histories. The exhibition, 'Printing Women' focuses on Henrietta Louisa Koenen’s (1830–1881) collection and signals women’s continuing participation in printmaking as well as the Library’s longstanding commitment to acquiring and exhibiting prints made by women from around the world. Working with the Library’s Digital Experience team, the exhibition's curator, Madeleine Viljoen will feature a new artist's work on the exhibition's web page every two weeks throughout the Read More ›

Joseph Hawley Papers Digitized

As part of the Early American Manuscripts Project, the Library has just digitized and made available online the Joseph Hawley papers. Hawley was a lawyer, legislator, and militia officer from Northampton, Massachusetts. Read More ›

Reintroducing the Boston Committee of Correspondence Records

Looking back on the Revolution in 1815, John Adams remarked that “The History of the United States never can be written” without the records of the Boston Committee of Correspondence. Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: October 2015

The following titles on our Recent Acquisitions Display are just a few of our new books, which are available at the reference desk in the Dorot Jewish Division. Catalog entries for the books can be found by clicking on their covers.Read More ›

Understanding the Syrian Refugee Crisis

Over the past several weeks, we've heard a lot about the plight of refugees fleeing Syria and its neighboring countries for safer and more stable living conditions in Europe. Such a systemic, rapidly-changing issue can be hard comprehend, but we are confronted with images and stories that beg for our understanding.Read More ›

Louisa May Alcott, In Her Own Words

On September 30, 1868, the first volume of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women was published. The New York Public Library has many, many copies of Little Women and its sequels.Read More ›

The Natural History of Early Modern Needlework

From the sixteenth century on, men -- rather than women -- developed pattern books on which women based their needlepoint work. This blog explores the works of two late sixteenth and seventeenth-century women, Isabella Parasole and Maria Sibylla Merian, who overthrew these conventions, first by creating textile patterns for women and then by branching out into the study of natural history, a field that was dominated by male explorers and discoverers. Read More ›

Bruce Jay Friedman, A Story Teller: Humanizing Humility

The term Black Humor was coined in the 1960s by critics who regarded him as a founder, and although Friedman admits that he was never fond of the term, it is true that he helped pioneer this darker comic tone that was grimmer than conventional satire.Read More ›
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