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The New York Public Library will be closed September 5 through September 7 in observance of Labor Day.

Posts from the Music Division

Frank Sinatra's "The House I Live In"

The Sinatra: An American Icon exhibition has many wonderful media stations for visitors—songs, excerpts from television specials, films trailers and featurettes, and a juke box. But the one that is garnering the most attention is “The House I Live In,” the RKO short subject that won Sinatra his first Oscar. Read More ›

Despotic Characters: Researching Shorthand at the New York Public Library

Through multiple gifts over the years, The New York Public Library has gathered an outstanding and extensive collection of shorthand material. These items can help answer such wide-ranging questions as: What was the eruption of Mount Vesuvius like? Why are some of the lines in Shakespeare’s King Lear so weird? and How can I take faster notes in my classes and work meetings?Read More ›

"...a half-acre of strings..." Sinatra on the Radio

LPA is hosting public programs about listening to Sinatra on the radio, as thousands of Americans would do every week. Read More ›

An Incommensurable Grief... Louis Moreau Gottschalk on Lincoln's Assassination

This week marks the 150th anniversary of the final battles of the Civil War, followed all too closely by the anniversary of President Lincoln’s assassination. The Library for the Performing Arts has materials that document this time period.Read More ›

Orquesta en su casa: LPA at Casita Maria

The Boro-Linc project is bringing performances and projects from the Lincoln Center campus to the other boroughs. Read More ›

Great Albums You May Have Missed: Miles Davis Dark Magus (1997)

Every jazz fan has their favorite Miles period, I'm probably in the minority but I'll take his electric phase from '68-75 which expanded his amazing skills by importing the energy of rock and funk.Read More ›

Rated B (for Behavior and Blogging)

Sesame Street's Crumby Pictures series teaches “executive function,” which means both self-control and learning ways to cue behavior and decision making. They focus on Cookie Monster, whose control issues focus on cookies. Read More ›

MY Business is to Sing: Emily Dickinson, Musician and Poet

The daily musical activities of poet Emily Dickinson reveal a great deal about the cultural offerings available to a woman of her time, place, and class. For Dickinson, these experiences provided a vital and necessary backdrop for her identity and and more importantly, for her emerging poetic voice.Read More ›

Sesame Street at LPA: About That Tomato...

I love collaborative exhibitions because I learn so much about our partners. Working with Susie Tofte, the archivist of the Sesame Workshop and curator of the exhibition, I learned about the Workshop’s outreach programs for families dealing with the challenges of military service and incarceration. Now that the exhibition is available for viewing, I see that section’s impact on visitors who expected only fun, children’s content.Read More ›

In Praise of Hoots

At "Somebody Come and Play" you can see Big Bird, Cookie Monster, Bert and Ernie, the Count, Snuffy, and Oscar up close. And, by my special request, Hoots.Read More ›

Subway Series at New York City Libraries This September

It’s not often that you can see a Grammy Award-winning group perform live for free, right in your own neighborhood—so be sure to catch St. Luke’s Chamber Ensemble next month at your local library. Read More ›

Punk and the [Anti-]Prom

Every year, my interns and I have the pleasure of working with the students at the High School for Fashion Industries in conjunction with the Library’s wonderful Anti-Prom projects, managed by our colleagues in Teen services. Past themes have included Goth, Monsters, Super Heroes, and Glam. This year was Punk.Read More ›

Archiving Amram: The Beauty of Now

In the following blog post David Amram shares his hopes for the upcoming programs. Read More ›

Beatles Overload? 5 Beatlesque Bands You Should Hear

You can't help it, you are just so jazzed that it is The Beatles' 50th Anniversary of their appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show that you've grown your moptop, dusted off your Hofner Bass and even broke out your 

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David Amram's New York

Join Amram, plus author Bill Morgen and sociologist Audrey Sprenger, for a walking tour of the Lincoln Center campus and other nearby cultural landmarks that have influenced his life and music. David has many inspirational and charming stories to share.Read More ›

Turn Left at Greenland: The Beatles Meet the Press

The Beatles were not only wonderful songwriters and singers, but they were experts at peppering their press conferences with wit—and avoiding real answers to meaningful questions.Read More ›

I Read the Journal-American Today, Oh Dear: Beatles Files Part 2

I have been working in the Music Division since 1997 and have been a Beatles fan since I was ten years old. So, over the years, I have made an effort to keep track of any new Beatles’ related material that we acquire. The Music Division, like the theatre division, also has extensive clipping and photo files. Read More ›

Great Albums You Might Have Missed: Black 47's Fire of Freedom (1993)

I was sitting shotgun on DJ duty during a long volleyball road trip back in high school when I put on a new tape (yes, cassette days) that I was loving of a band I had recently seen playing live at SUNY Albany (yes, pre Internet days). The group was Black 47, the album

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The Holy Grail of the Percussion World, Part 1

William F. Ludwig himself put it best when he said, “On February 9th, 1964, a new musical event burst from the TV screens across America. The Beatles had arrived, featuring Ringo Starr and his Ludwig Black Oyster drums. Literally overnight everyone wanted a drum set like Ringo’s. The drum boom was born!”Read More ›

Finding a Life at The New York Public Library: Emily Dickinson, the Avid Music Collector

December 10th is the birthday of Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), a beloved poet who in her youth was a talented pianist and active music collector. The collections of The New York Public Library serve to illuminate those interests and activities in a variety of ways.

Archives & Special Collections,Amherst College, used with permission.In 1846, Emily Dickinson's second cousin, Olivia Coleman, wrote to Emily from Philadelphia: "We discovered a new Music Store, and I purchased the song 'I'm alone—all alone,' for I am truly alone without 

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