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Posts from the Billy Rose Theatre Division

Evelyn Waugh and His "Most Offensive Work"

While in Hollywood consulting on a potential film adaptation of Brideshead that never materialized, Waugh observed American West Coast culture up close. His reaction was... not flattering.Read More ›

Musical of the Month: Golden Dawn

Considered today, Golden Dawn is obviously problematic on multiple levels, and the lack of any revivals of the show is not necessarily a bad thing. However, the study of non-canonical works like Golden Dawn remains crucial to understanding the history of musicals.Read More ›

Kate Claxton Head Shots: This Week Only

The cartes de visite, cabinet photographs and stereograms of Kate Claxton, an intensely photogenic actress.Read More ›

Contact Strips and Head Shots

The advent of contact sheets was great for photography studios and of course, actors and their agents.Read More ›

Musical of the Month: Little Nemo

Little Nemo opened on Broadway at the opulent New Amsterdam Theatre on October 20, 1908, after a three-week tryout in Philadelphia. According to the New York Times, the city had “seen nothing bigger or better in extravaganza than ‘Little Nemo.’” It had also never seen a theatrical production more expensive.Read More ›

Triptych Head Shots

Two unusual examples of triptychs, which combine headshots with character portraits.Read More ›

The Jitney Players, The Traveling Theater Troupe

During the Elizabethan era, traveling troupes of actors would perform in different towns throughout the United Kingdom. Inspired by these theatrical artists, Horace Bushnell Cheney and his wife Alice Keating Cheney established the Jitney Players in the United States in 1923.Read More ›

The Stereograph Headshot

When we started to think about an exhibition on Head Shots based on the Library for the Performing Arts’ collections, we discovered that almost every format in the history of photographic portraits was used as a headshot. Read More ›

Frank Sinatra's "The House I Live In"

The Sinatra: An American Icon exhibition has many wonderful media stations for visitors—songs, excerpts from television specials, films trailers and featurettes, and a juke box. But the one that is garnering the most attention is “The House I Live In,” the RKO short subject that won Sinatra his first Oscar. Read More ›

Sinatra at the Stage Door Canteen

We have received many questions recently about this photo, the secondary key image for the exhibition.Read More ›

"...a half-acre of strings..." Sinatra on the Radio

LPA is hosting public programs about listening to Sinatra on the radio, as thousands of Americans would do every week. Read More ›

Musical of the Month: Rex

A guest post by Sherman Yellen. Read More ›

Ol' Blue Eyes: Ready for His Close-up

Frank Sinatra is known first and foremost as a singer and recording artist; after all, before he acquired the nicknames “Chairman of the Board” or “Ol’ Blue Eyes,” he was known as “The Voice.” But his career as a movie actor earned him nearly as much fame and acclaim as did his musical career. Read More ›

How the Vote Was Won, and Exported

The history behind these comedic British Suffrage plays and their warm reception in the United States.Read More ›

Musical of the Month: The Rothschilds

A guest post by Sherman Yellen, bookwriter of The Rothschilds.Read More ›

Sesame Street and the People In Your Neighborhood

Beyond the animation cels, drawings, media and the amazing experience of seeing the Muppets up close, the exhibition, "Somebody Come and Play,” lets us see and hear the way that research and entertainment/production values inform each other to create memorable moments. And, since the 1970-1971 season, those moments have include Jeffrey Moss’ song “Who are the People in Your Neighborhood?”Read More ›

Rated B (for Behavior and Blogging)

Sesame Street's Crumby Pictures series teaches “executive function,” which means both self-control and learning ways to cue behavior and decision making. They focus on Cookie Monster, whose control issues focus on cookies. Read More ›

Musical of the Month: Tenderloin

The show opened at the 46th Street (now the Richard Rodgers) Theater in October 1960 to mixed reviews and closed the following spring after only 271 performances. It has received respectful attention in performances off-Broadway and in City Center’s Encores! series, but has never been revived on Broadway. What exactly went wrong?Read More ›

Happy 101st, Vivien!

Vivien Leigh, who was born November 5, 1913, may not have lived to see her 54th birthday, but she is one of the rare performers whose fame has long outlasted her death. Leigh's distinctive blend of delicacy and power as an actress, coupled with her great beauty, have helped to enshrine her.Read More ›

Happy Halloween to The Count

But the Muppet most closely associated with numbers is, of course, the Count. The Count who loves to count.Read More ›
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