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Posts by Jessica Cline

The Reader's Den: About the Author of "Passing"

"Nella Larsen attempts quite a different thing. She explains just what "passing" is: the psychology of the thing; the reaction of it on friend and enemy. It is a difficult task, but she attacks the problem fearlessly and with consummate art. The great problem is under what circumstances would a person take a step like this and how would they feel about it? And how would their fellows feel?" W.E. Burghardt Du Bois, "Review of Passing." Crisis 36:7, July 1929.

Passing is the second novel by Nella Larsen 

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The Reader's Den: "Passing" by Nella Larsen

Welcome to July’s edition of the Reader’s Den!  This month we will be reading and discussing Passing by Nella Larsen. Published in 1929, it is a novel of modern black life whose relationships are wrought with psychological tension. Read More ›

Art in the Stacks: French Neoclassical Painting, March 23

The passions of mythological gods have been the subject of painting since the Greeks and Romans first told their stories to create an allegorical world for the lust and greed of humanity.  Lucky for us, the beauty and scandal portrayed by artists have been our feast ever since. 

Without exception, on Tuesday, March 23, Katie Hanson will address the amorous Greco-Roman mythological subjects in paintings by Anne-Louis Girodet,

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The Heart of Your Life, The Life of Your Art

In celebration of the National Day of Listening, the Art and Picture Collections have been collaborating with StoryCorps to produce an all-day drop-in event to consider your art and your life.

We invited six artists to the StoryCorps booth to record the story of art in their lives. And, on the National Day of Listening (the day after 

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Are you an early riser or a late worker?

Then you are in luck! The Mid-Manhattan Library has expanded its hours and we are celebrating by sharing donuts and coffee from Tim Horton's with everyone who comes by today! Also, stop in at 8 p.m. for a live music performance by the Bushwick Book Club, a group of songwriters who take their inspiration from literary works.

Mid-Manhattan's New Hours: Monday - Thursday, 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Saturday & Sunday, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Many of New York Public 

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Bibliographies (not biographies)

 As a librarian, I am a list maker, and lately I have been lucky enough to review the bibliography titles in the Mid-Manhattan Library Art Collection. Bibliographies are elaborate lists that contain citations, and sometimes abstracts, of other books, journal articles, etc., that relate to a focused subject. If you have ever written a research paper, you probably created a bibliography at the end, listing the publication information of the materials you used in your research process.

An 

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Ode on a Grecian Urn: A Celebration of Art and Poetry

Color Prints of the Thirty-six Immortal Woman Poets (1801) A work of art has often inspired a poem, like The Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh, which sparked Anne Sexton’s poem of the same name; and likewise, a poem can inspire an artwork, as with

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Reader's Den: "Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon" Discussion Wrap-Up

If you enjoyed spending time with the lively and passionate characters of Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon by Jorge Amado this month, you may also find these titles interesting:

The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende

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Reader's Den: Discussion Questions for "Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon"

Have you been enjoying Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon by Jorge Amado? Please join me in discussing this novel by considering some of the following questions, or posting your own questions, thoughts, or favorite excerpts.

The story begins with the shooting of Dona Sinházinha (the wife) and Dr. Osmundo (the lover) by Colonel Jesuino Mendonca (the husband), and with old Filomena leaving Nacib. These two elements set forth the motion of the entire story and set the main thematic element 

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Reader's Den: "Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon" is “Innocent yet knowing, unquenchable and enticing…”

Read what Juan de Onis writes about Gabriela in 1962 for the American publication of Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon:

“…an exciting and enjoyable romp of a book, rich in literary delights […] For Americans, ‘Gabriela’ has additional significance, as a striking portrait of Brazilian reality and change, it may serve to bridge the ‘gap of understanding’ between two culturally and psychologically distinct areas of the New World.” — New York Times Book 

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Reader's Den: "Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon"

Welcome to the Reader’s Den!

Please join me in reading the book selection for March, Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon (Gabriela, cravo e canela) by Jorge Amado.

It’s 1925, and Ilhéus, a small Brazilian export town, is experiencing a disruption in its traditions, and the locals are finding that modern life is subject to comic interpretation. Join them in drinking sugarcane rum at the Vesuvius Bar courtesy of Nacib Saad, the Syrian bar owner; sharing in the gossip 

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