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Posts by Bogdan Horbal

Fashion Advertising A Hundred Years Ago

1914 was a very eventful year in the world, and in magazine advertising.Read More ›

Digital Railroad Materials, Part 2

Is there anybody out there who does not like trains? OK, perhaps more than a few people are fed up with their daily commute. Also, trains do sometimes fail us. It was very unfortunate that during the March Snowstorm of 1888 about seventy-five miles of the Long Island Railroad system was blockaded by the snow and that the street railroad system of Brooklyn became useless.Read More ›

William Curtis and "The Botanical Magazine, or, Flower-Garden Displayed"

The world's longest running botanical magazine was (eventually) named after its founder William Curtis (1746–1799), who was an English botanist and entomologist. From 1771 to 1777 Curtis worked as demonstrator of plants and Praefectus Horti at the Chelsea Physic Garden, which was established a century earlier by the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries for its apprentices to study the medicinal qualities of plants. Read More ›

Digital Railroad Materials, Part 1

The New York Public Library offers a tremendous amount of material in e-format. We have been purchasing e-books for years including e-text, e-audio, e-music, and e-video. E-books include both fiction and non-fiction. Among the latter is Christian Wolmar's The Great Railroad Revolution.Read More ›

Will Bicycles Save the Human Race?

Bicycles were first introduced in 19th century Europe and by now number approximately one billion worldwide, providing the principal means of transportation in many regions. In Bicycle: The History, David Herlihy noted the passions the introduction of bicycle aroused. Mark Twain (1835-1910) supposedly wrote: “Get a bicycle. You will not regret it—if you live.” Read More ›

Gustave Eiffel Beyond the "Useless and Monstrous" Tower

Gustave Eiffel who was born 15 December 1832 in Dijon, Côte-d'Or, France was much more than “just” the creator of the Eiffel Tower. A man of many passions and accomplishments, Eiffel attended high school at Lycee Royal where he studied engineering, history and literature. He graduated with a degree in both science and humanities. He first studied at the École Polytechnique but later transferred to the École Centrale des Arts et Manufactures in Paris, graduating in 1855 with a diploma in …chemistry. He was interested in construction from an early age and a couple of years after Read More ›

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