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Booktalking "The Crocodile Hunter" by Steve and Terri Irwin

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Steve Irwin was incredibly lucky to be born into a wildlife park. His parents, Lyn and Bob Irwin owned and operated a reptile park in Australia. On a visit "Down Under", American Terri was captivated by the crocodile-loving zoo keeper. She found a way to talk to him, and they commenced a courtship, which consisted of several visits across the world. Terri felt homesick each time that she left Australia.

The Irwins were astounded by the popularity of their wildlife documentaries. They got to know the land and animals of the Australian Outback intimately, as they spent half of their lives in the bush. They must have been incredibly hardy to endure living off the land for weeks at a time. Education and research are the most important parts of their work.

The Irwins are most knowledgeable about crocodiles, but Australia Zoo also rehabilitates all types of injured wildlife, which consists of marsupials such as kangaroos and platypuses, as well as lizards, snakes and dingoes. They serve as consultants to zoos across the world, who may have questions about crocodile relocation and/or medical issues.

Different species of crocodiles live in freshwater and saltwater. Saltwater crocs are considered to be more aggressive. They can grow to be up to 20 feet in length and 2000 pounds in weight. The danger of fatality is ever-present while capturing, relocating and hand-feeding crocs. 

The Irwins have two children, daughter Bindi and son Robert. Bindi has written several fictional wildlife adventure books for kids, and she is committed to following her father's legacy.

The Crocodile Hunter by Steve and Terri Irwin, 2001

This book had an undeniably morose appeal for me; Steve Irwin was such a champion of wildlife. He lost his life in 2006 after an encounter with a stingray.

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