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April Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

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Classic New York City architecture, the cleverness of crows, the real Toscanini, being good, color and commerce, anarchists, a call to secularism, the Asian underground railroad, gourmet food carts, escaping the Nazis, environmental crisis, structural tile vaulting and sexual discrimination in the workplace. What do these disparate topics have in common?

They are all subjects of recent non-fiction books whose authors are speaking at the Mid-Manhattan Library this month. Please join us at 6:30 p.m. on the sixth floor to hear these authors discuss their work. If you can't make it to the programs, you can reserve copies of their books using the links below.

 

 

 

 

Monday, April 1: Anne Walker discusses The Architecture of Warren & Wetmore, who built Grand Central Terminal, the New York Yacht Club and many other iconic New York buildings.

Tuesday, April 2: Professor John M. Marzluff discusses Gifts of the Crow: How Perception, Emotion, and Thought Allow Smart Birds to Behave like Humans.

Thursday, April 4: Cesare Civetta reveals The Real Toscanini in a multi-media presentation.

Monday, April 8: The original New York Times ethicist Randy Cohen tells us how to Be Good: How to Navigate the Ethics of Everything.

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, April 9: Professor Regina Lee Blaszczyk describes the often unrecognized role of the color profession in consumer culture in The Color Revolution.

Wednesday, April 10: Karen Arvich describes Sasha and Emma: The Anarchist Odyssey of Alexander Berkman and Emma Goldman.

Thursday, April 11: Professor Jacques Berlinerblau argues for a return to secularism in How to Be Secular: A Call to Arms for Religious Freedom.

Monday, April 15: Melanie Kirkpatrick discusses Escape from North Korea: The Untold Story of Asia's Underground Railroad.

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, April 17: Siobhan Wallace a.k.a. Blondie, and Alexandra Penfold a.k.a. Brownie, co-authors of New York à la Cart: Recipes and Stories from the Big Apple's Best Food Trucks, host a panel discussion, "Tweeting and Eating: How Social Media has Changed the Way We Eat" with guest panelists Thomas DeGeest of Wafels & Dinges Belgian Waffle truck, Ed Levine, founder of SeriousEats.com and author of Serious Eats: A Comprehensive Guide to Making and Eating Delicious Food Wherever You Are, Chef Adam Sobel of the Cinnamon Snail Vegan Truck, and Melissa Zhang of Ruskin International Communications.

Monday, April 22: Dr. Miriam Finder Tasini graphically recounts how she and her family narrowly escaped from Krakow, Poland, in 1939, just ahead of the advancing Nazi invaders, when she was only three years old in Where Are We Going?

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, April 23: Global food and democracy activist Frances Moore Lappé confronts accepted wisdom of environmentalism in EcoMind: Changing the Way We Think, to Create the World We Want.

Wednesday, April 24: Professor John A Ochsendorf draws attention to an innovative builder and visionary architect in Guastavino Vaulting: The Art of Structural Tile.

Monday, April 29: Lynn Povich, the first female senior editor at Newsweek magazine, describes The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace.

Find lists of non-fiction books by authors speaking at the Mid-Manhattan Library in the BiblioCommons catalog:

Please check our online calendar for additional programs. The above list includes authors who are discussing their recent non-fiction books at the Mid-Manhattan Library this month, but we have many other interesting readings and talks on offer, including art lectures and discussions, such as our MoMA @ the Library series, monthly panel discussions featuring authors from the Mystery Writers of America, New York Chapter and short story readings at Mixed Bag: Story Time for Grown-ups

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