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Stuff for the Teen Age

Stop, Rewind, Play: Every Day by David Levithan

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A is sixteen years old, and has never been the same person twice. Every morning, A wakes up in the body of a different sixteen-year-old: a boy, a girl, an athlete, an addict, a star student, a burnout. Then A falls in love, and things get REALLY complicated.

Every Day by David Levithan takes a weird but simple premise — imagine what it would be like to wake up each day in a different person's body — and expands on this idea with some thought-provoking questions. What kind of an impact would this have on people's lives? Would you or the person whose body you were inhabiting think you were crazy? Do you have the right to derail someone else's life? How much could you hurt or help someone by living in that person's body for just one day?

A can't control which body he will find himself (or herself) in each day, and wakes up each morning with no idea what the day will bring. A has learned from past mistakes to be careful — to make sure the body doesn't eat anything that will cause an allergic reaction, for example. But A must also be careful about fitting in, because A's behavior could change that person's life for the better or for the worse.

When A wakes up as a boy named Justin, it seems like it's going to be an ordinary school day. But when A looks through Justin's eyes and sees Justin's girlfriend Rhiannon, he sees a sweet and beautiful girl that Justin doesn't appreciate. After A and Rhiannon spend a few hours together, A starts falling in love with her, which creates a whole new set of questions.

How can A convince Rhiannon that her boyfriend Justin is a jerk and she should break up with him?

Will Rhiannon accept any part of this unbelievable story and understand who A really is?

Can two people have a future together if one person's future is constantly changing?

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