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Reader’s Den

June Reader's Den: 11/22/63 Week Four

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For new and existing fans of Stephen King, here are some things to check out next:

Bag of Bones, recently made into a 2-part TV series starring Pierce Brosnan. The accompanying website, darkscorestories.com is full of easter eggs for the intrepid reader.

The new Dark Tower novel, The Wind Through the Keyhole.

The works of King's son, Joe Hill, especially his graphic novel series, Locke & Key. King thanks Joe Hill in his afterword for coming up with a better ending. If you'd like to read King's original ending, you can view it at his website. Also, director Jonathan Demme is in the process of adapting 11/22/63 into a film.

Richard Greener's second novel in the Locator series, The Lacey Confession. This series is the inspiration for FOX's The Finder, but aside from the character's names the resemblance is pretty superficial. In this novel, Walter Sherman comes across the diary of international smuggler and British lord Lacey which includes a written confession to the JFK assassination.

11/22/63 the novel doesn't dwell on conspiracy theories, but the 1997 film Conspiracy Theory has a neat premise: a conspiracy theorist who gets some things right.

"Stephen King's Wang: The Literary History of Word Processing." This talk by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum with NYPL Labs looked at how word processing and other technologies affects the craft of writing. This is of particular interest for Stephen King fans since many of his main characters are authors, often with pending deadlines (Bag of Bones, The Shining, Secret Window). Available on archive.org.

For other books and movies that deal with the science and the science fiction of time travel, visit BiblioCommons.

Join us for the July edition of the Reader's Den, when we'll be discussing The Man Who Was Thursday by G.K. Chesterton.

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