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New York Times Bestsellers at NYPL — May 6, 2012

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For the week of May 6, 2012 we have hardcover fiction, hardcover non-fiction, and children's picture books.

If you have an iPhone, iPad or Android phone, there is a free app! Use it with your library card/username and pin.

Click on any of the titles below and place a hold to request the item. Remember to update your contact information (phone number or e-mail address), so you are notified when the book arrives for you at your local library. Don't have a library card yet? It's simple! Find out how to get one. Titles are available in regular print, large print, audio, and in electronic format — for FREE!

Week of May 6, 2012

 

Hardcover Fiction

  1. The Innocent, by David Baldacci  
  2. The Witness, by Nora Roberts
  3. Calico Joe, by John Grisham  
  4. Unnatural Acts, by  Stuart Woods
  5. Guilty Wives, by James Patterson and David Ellis

 

 

Hardcover Nonfiction

  1. Drift, by Rachel Maddow  
  2. Let's Pretend This Never Happened, by Jenny Lawson
  3. Imagine, by Jonah Lehrer
  4. The President's Club, by Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy
  5. The Big Miss, by Hank Haney

 

 

Children's Picture Books

  1. The Duckling Gets a Cookie?!, by Mo Willems  
  2. The Lorax, by Dr. Seuss
  3. The Very Fairy Princess: Here comes the flower girl, by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton. Illustrated by Christine Davenier
  4. Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site, by Sherri Duskey Rinker and Tom Lichtenheld
  5. Press Here, by Hervé Tullet
     

For more information on this week's best sellers, visit the New York Times website and check out the full list. There is also a special section for Best Sellers in the Library's catalog, BiblioCommons.

 



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