Click to search the Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library Skip Navigation

The New York Public Library will be closed on Sunday, April 20.

NYPL Blogs

Illuminating collections and services at The New York Public Library
Learn more »

A Black Tulip Comes to the Pforzheimer Collection

Here at the Pforzheimer Collection, our big acquisition of the year is a black tulip, one of the rarest items, in the Shelleyan world: Original Poetry by Victor and Cazire, 1810, Shelley's first book of verse. Lost to the public eye shortly after its publication and believed, till 1898, to have vanished altogether, only three other copies are known; one of them is imperfect. Even the Bodleian Library, holder of the best Shelley collection in the world, does not own it.Read More ›

Booktalking "A Caldecott Celebration" by Leonard Marcus

On the 70th anniversary of the inception of the Caldecott Medal, Leonard Marcus wrote this wonderful edition. Included are seven Caldecott Medal winners, one from each decade that the prize has been given.Read More ›

Remembering Gabriel García Márquez (1928-2014)

The staff of the Library was saddened to hear of the death of the renowned Latin American writer and journalist, Gabriel García Márquez, who died at his home in Mexico City on Thursday, April 17, 2014. Read More ›

Booktalking "Double Act" by Jacqueline Wilson

10-year-old identical twins Ruby and Garnet Barker do everything together, and they have lots of fun in the process. Ruby is outgoing and energetic, while Garnet is more reserved and careful in her actions.Read More ›

A Trip Down Memory Lane: The Lasting Influence of Illmatic

Tomorrow marks the 20th anniversary of Nas’s debut album, Illmatic. On Wednesday, I had the privilege to attend the opening of the Tribeca Film Festival to watch my friend and former colleague Erik Parker’s documentary, Time Is Illmatic. Parker’s film examines Nas’s groundbreaking album because it symbolizes the shift of hip-hop’s nerve center and lyrics in 1994. Read More ›

NYC Teen Author Festival: March 2014

We were lucky to have the 6th annual Teen Author Festival at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building in March again this year. Author David Levithan has been hosting this informative gathering of teen authors, teens, librarians and teachers alike in different locations in the NYC area.Read More ›

我是落花生的女儿 || Wo shi Luohuasheng de nü er

Chi B Xu, Yanji Wo shi Luohuasheng de nü er == 我是落花生的女儿Read More ›

Best of New Music (April 2014 Edition)

A periodic list of some of the most exciting, newly purchased CDs for our circulating collections.Read More ›

Tributo a Gabriel García Márquez (1927-2014)

Gabriel García Márquez, el noble autor galardonado con el Premio Nobel de la Literatura, acaba de fallecer a la edad de 87 años. García Márquez ha sido considerado uno de los más grandes escritores de habla hispana.Read More ›

The Nican Mopohua and Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe

Among the many treasures of the New York Public Library are documents created as the New World was explored and settled by Europeans and a hybrid culture emerged. James Lenox (1880-1880) whose books, manuscripts, and maps formed the great base for the Library's collection was interested in the history of the Americas. This blog post focuses on a set of documents long referred to as the Monumentos Guadalupanos, or Guadeloupean Monuments, and one document in particular, the Nican Mopohua. A facsimile edition of this historic manuscript is currently underway from SYL Creaciones Graficas and Read More ›

When Experience Pays: Paid vs. Unpaid Internships

"Can I get paid for my internship?" is a common question often asked by new college graduates. Laura Fortman, the principal deputy administrator for the Wage and Hour Division of the U.S. Department of Labor, will help you understand when internship programs must pay interns not just in terms of experience, but in cold, hard cash. The Fair Labor Standards Act, as interpreted by the Supreme Court, provides criteria for what is and is not legal regarding payment for internships.Read More ›

Booktalking "Rein It In: An A Circuit Novel" by Georgina Bloomberg and Catherine Hapka

A Circuit—one of the most competitive horse show circuits available. Teenagers who are both horse crazy and relationship crazy, sneaking quick kisses and dating in between all of the preparation for horse shows and competition. Read More ›

Homemade Natural Beauty Products Made Easy

The Epiphany Library is offering two workshops in April on making beauty products at home. While in the class we are specifically only making two items, lip balm and body scrub (both of which are surprisingly easy), there is also a section in which we discuss why someone would want to do this. Below is the presentation, some handy recipes and also books and websites for the budding beauty alchemist.Read More ›

Avant-Garde Periodicals Meet Digital Archives

As curator for small press materials I was excited to attend "Remediating the Avant Garde: Magazines and Digital Archives," a symposium at Princeton University, home of the Blue Mountain Project.Read More ›

Booktalking "Higher Education?" by Andrew Hacker and Claudia Dreifus

All of the talk these days is about the rising cost of tertiary education. Is it really necessary for so many people to go to college? Ever wonder why exactly college costs are so astronomically high?Read More ›

Epistolary Novels and Letter Writing

"Epistolary" is one of those words that just fun to say or think about, like the word "condensation". An epistolary novel is simply a novel consisting of correspondence between characters. This is one of those rarely used writing devices, I assume because it's difficult to sustain throughout a novel.Read More ›

Celebrating Women with Disabilities: An Interview with Kathleen Martinez

Women have always faced discrimination compared to their male counterparts and that extends to employment which is especially challenging to women with disabilities. However, there have been some positive changes. In this blog post U.S. Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy, Kathleen Martinez, gives you career guidance and encouragement. Please join Kathleen Martinez to celebrate women with disabilities. Read More ›

Turn Left at Greenland: The Beatles Meet the Press

The Beatles were not only wonderful songwriters and singers, but they were experts at peppering their press conferences with wit—and avoiding real answers to meaningful questions.Read More ›

Three Reads: Bad Guys of Gilded Age New York

Here are three books about some of our fine city's bad guys, lying, cheating, and stealing their way through the 1890s.Read More ›

Send Me a Letter: Books on Card and Letter Writing

While engaging in some much-needed but rarely performed spring cleaning in my apartment, I recently encountered several letters written to me by a maternal great-great aunt years ago. This dovetailed nicely with my supervisor's request that I write my April blog post on the topic of card and letter writing. Read More ›
Page 1 of 216 Next

Chat with a librarian now

Subscribe to NYPL Blogs RSS Feeds