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LIVE from the NYPL: EDMUND DE WAAL in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

October 3, 2011

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In The Hare with Amber Eyes: An Inheritance, acclaimed potter Edmund de Waal traces the history of his paternal grandmother’s family - the Jewish Ephrussi banking dynasty. With the grace of a novelist, de Waal navigates the sets of prejudices faced by each generation of the illustrious Ephrussi clan. The central thread for de Waal’s narrative is an heirloom of Japanese netsuke. Considering this collection of miniatures partly as a prism, de Waal’s offers an inspiring response to the turmoil of early twentieth century Europe.

EDMUND DE WAAL’s porcelain has been displayed in many museum collections around the world, and he has recently made an installation for the dome of the Victoria and Albert Museum. He was apprenticed as a potter, studied in Japan, and studied English at Cambridge. He is Professor of Ceramics at the University of Westminster and lives in London with his family.

PAUL HOLDENGRÄBER is the director of LIVE from the NYPL.

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deWaal video

Had to miss this one due to a conflict. So glad you videoed the presentation. I had read the book a while ago, and knew de Waal's work as a potter and speaker, but never experienced the emotions he had about his family and his belief in the touching of objects. truly a touching experience to watch, even if second hand, but in this format, I can revisit as often as I like. Please continue to video as many presentations as possible, since they serve as an archive to those who missed the original or want to revisit what they already experienced. P. Holdengraber did a great job as interviewer.